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OPERA framework

July 2016

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"A guiding lens for CESR's national enforcement work, the OPERA framework allows an assessment that triangulates outcomes, policies and resources to provide a much fuller picture of what a state is doing to promote the realization of specific rights. Importantly, it traces economic and social deprivations and disparities back to the actions or omissions of the state, to make the case that they constitute an injustice and a violation of human rights."

Understanding the interaction of competence standards and reasonable adjustments

HEWLETT, Katherine
NIGHTINGALE, Christine
STEVENS, Tony
July 2015

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“Higher education institutions (HEIs) have responsibility for developing non-discriminatory competence standards, and designing a study programme to address these competence standards. HEIs also have the responsibility to ensure that assessment methods address the competence standards. Adjustments to ways that competence standards are assessed may be required so that disabled students are not put at a disadvantage in demonstrating their achievement. This guidance aims to support HEIs meet these institutional and legal responsibilities, and promote disability equality” by providing information and examples on key areas. The guidance will be of use to all staff involved in developing and assessing competence standards

The Malawi key informant child disability project

TATARYN, Myroslava
et al
August 2014

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“The aim of this study was to use the KIM to estimate the prevalence of moderate/severe physical, sensory and intellectual impairments and epilepsy among children in two districts (Ntcheu and Thyolo) in Malawi. The Key Informant Method (KIM) is a novel method for generating these data. KIM focuses on training community volunteers to identify local children who may have disabilities, who are then screened by medical professionals and referred on for appropriate health and rehabilitation interventions. Consequently, the method offers an alternative to population-based surveys of disability in children, which can be costly and time consuming”

The Malawi key informant child disability project : summary report

TATARYN, Myroslava
et al
August 2014

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This report provides a summary of research project conducted by the International Centre for Evidence in Disability at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and the University of Malawi. The study used the Key Informant Method (KIM) to estimate the prevalence of moderate/severe physical, sensory and intellectual impairments and epilepsy among children in two districts (Ntcheu and Thyolo) in Malawi. This report presents summary of the study’s background information, aims and objectives, key findings, conclusions and recommendations

Two stage child disability study among children 2 to 9 years : Bhutan 2010 - 2011

THE NATIONAL STATISTICS BUREAU (NSB), Government of Bhutan
Ministry of Education (MoE)
Ministry of Health (MoH)
2012

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“This report highlights the salient findings of the two-stage child disability study among children aged 2-9 years conducted in 2011. The first stage was a screen to identify children with conditions making them more likely to be living with a disability. The second stage was a detailed assessment to accurately determine their disability status. This two-stage procedure is designed to reduce the costs of administering a detailed assessment to many children who are highly unlikely to have a disability”

Child poverty in Vietnam : using adult equivalence scales to estimate income-poverty for different age groups

WHITE, Howard
MASSET, Edoardo
2002

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This paper ..."begins by reviewing different approaches to estimating child expenditure, arguing that one based on equivalence scales is the only defensible approach. Part 3 explains the theory behind the two most commonly used approaches, the method of empirical estimation and how these estimates are used to calculate child poverty. Part 4 applies the method to the case of Vietnam, and Part 5 concludes"

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