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Diagnostic study on Disabled Peoples’ Organisations and National Union of Organisations of the Disabled in Liberia

DEEPAK, Sunil
HARRIS, Naomi
November 2018

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A diagnostic study was carried out by a consultant to the DASU project in collaboration with the national umbrella organisation “National Union of Organizations of the
Disabled” (NUOD) to assess the institutional capacities of Disabled Peoples’ Organizations (DPOs) in Liberia. The study involved DPOs from the national capital Monrovia and in three counties – Bong, Grand Gedeh and Nimba.
The study included an initial Desk Review, collection of case studies from the field and visits to the counties to meet the county DPOs. Following these, a workshop was organised
in Monrovia in which representatives of NUOD and the concerned DPOs took part. The workshop looked at the strengths and challenges faced by NUOD and DPOs, focusing on the skills needed for stronger and active DPO leadership.

Learning from experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies to modify existing household toilets and water access

WORLD VISION
CBM Australia
2018

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This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HOME MODIFICATIONS FOR WASH ACCESS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes the strategies which were used to assist people with disabilities to access toilet and water facilities at their own home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka. Houses and toilet structures in the region were made of brick and concrete. No new toilets were built and modifications involved only minor work to existing household structures, water points and toilets.

NOTE:
The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

Quality rehabilitation for all. Lessons learnt from integrating rehabilitation services in two general hospitals in Bangladesh

BAART, Judith
RAHMAN, Nafeesur
November 2017

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Working from the theory that integrating basic rehabilitation care within the health care system in Bangladesh, rather than as a stand-alone service, could greatly improve awareness of and access to rehabilitation services, CDD piloted setting up therapeutic care centres within hospitals. This report presents the lessons learned.

Cochrane Rehabilitation Methodology Committee: an international survey of priorities for future work

LEVACK, William
et al
October 2017

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Cochrane Rehabilitation aims to improve the application of evidence-based practice in rehabilitation. It also aims to support Cochrane in the production of reliable, clinically meaningful syntheses of evidence related to the practice of rehabilitation, while accommodating the many methodological challenges facing the field. To this end, Cochrane Rehabilitation established a Methodology Committee to examine, explore and find solutions for the methodological challenges related to evidence synthesis and knowledge translation in rehabilitation. An international online survey was conducted via Cochrane Rehabilitation networks to canvass opinions regarding the future work priorities for this committee and to seek information on people’s current capabilities to assist with this work. One of the areas of debate concerned whether and how work on the application of Cochrane methods in low and middle income countries should be prioritised.

 

Eur J Phys Rehabil Med 2017;53:814-7

DOI: 10.23736/S1973-9087.17.04958-9

Disability and HIV

UNAIDS
August 2017

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This report highlights existing key evidence on the relationship between disability and HIV. It discusses the concrete steps needed for a person-centred, disability-inclusive HIV response that allows for increased participation of people with disabilities and integrates rehabilitation within the continuum of HIV care. Globally, it is estimated that 1 billion people (15% of the world’s population) have a disability. Of those aged over 15 years, approximately 110–190 million (2.2–3.8%) experience significant disabilities. Disability is increasing in prevalence due to ageing populations, trauma, accidents and the increase in chronic health conditions, including HIV. Persistent discrimination against and exclusion of people with disabilities, in particular women and girls with disabilities, increases their vulnerability, including their risk of HIV infection.
 

The Rehabilitation Management System: Evaluating and planning physical rehabilitation services

PRYOR, Wesley
SMITH, Fleur
April 2017

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Ensuring quality and affordable rehabilitation services to anyone in need is at the heart of Handicap International mandate and strategy. The organisation is implementing physical rehabilitation projects in 40 countries,  The Rehabilitation Management System was initially developed to allow for more effective and reliable analysis of the quality of rehabilitation services in low resource countries. It draws on international standards, consensus and evidence and it is made of a set of scorecards that are used to monitor key components of management and support service planning. The initial instrument went through several participatory revisions and has been now implemented by Handicap International partners for about 6 years. While it covers domains that are specific to rehabilitation services, it is aligned to the broader health system strengthening framework. It is currently used in around 14 physical rehabilitation centers in 8 countries where settings and governance systems considerably vary, reflecting the different stages of development of physical rehabilitation services worldwide.

The “Rehabilitation Management System: Evaluating and planning Physical Rehabilitation services” guide follows the revision of the RMS scorecards, as a response to the demand from partner organisations, programmes and the Handicap International’s Rehabilitation Technical Unit for a greater adaptability of the system. It is hoped that this guide will further assist partners and programmes in implementing the RMS in effective and strategic management of their services in order to provide the highest quality care in the most sustainable manner.

Disability and HIV

UNAIDS
January 2017

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This report highlights existing key evidence on the relationship between disability and HIV. It discusses the concrete steps needed for a person-centred, disability-inclusive HIV response that allows for increased participation of people with disabilities and integrates rehabilitation within the continuum of HIV care.

Standards for prosthetics and orthotics

WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (WHO)
2017

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This document provides a set of standards and a manual for implementation to support countries in developing or improving high-quality, affordable prosthetics and orthotics services. Its aim is to ensure that prosthetics and orthotics services are people-centred and responsive to every individual’s personal and environmental needs. Implementation of these standards will support Member States in fulfilling their obligations under the CRPD and in meeting the SDGs, in particular Goal 3. With these standards, any government can develop national policies, plans and programmes for prosthetics and orthotics services of the highest standard. This document has two parts: the standards and an implementation manual. Both parts cover four areas of the health system:

• policy (governance, financing and information);

• products (prostheses and orthoses);

• personnel (workforce);

• provision of services

Rehabilitation in health systems

WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (WHO)
2017

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This document provides evidence-based, expert-informed recommendations and good practice statements to support health systems and stakeholders in strengthening and extending high-quality rehabilitation services so that they can better respond to the needs of populations. The recommendations are intended for government leaders and health policy-makers and are also relevant for sectors such as workforce and training. The recommendations and good practice statements may also be useful for people involved in rehabilitation research, service delivery, financing and assistive products, including professional organisations, academic institutions, civil society and nongovernmental and international organisations. The recommendations focus solely on rehabilitation in the context of health systems. They address the elements of service delivery and financing specifically. The recommendations were developed according to standard WHO procedures, detailed in the WHO handbook for guideline development

Users’ satisfaction with prosthetic and orthotic assistive devices in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic: A cross-sectional study

DURHAM, Jo
SYCHAREUN, Vanphanom
SANTISOUK, Phonevilay
et al
December 2016

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"Abstract

 

Purpose: User satisfaction with assistive devices is a predictor of use and an important outcome measure. This study evaluated client satisfaction with prosthetic and orthotic assistive devices and services in three provinces in the Lao People’s Democratic Republic.

 

Method: A cross-sectional study was done, using the Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology questionnaire. The sample was drawn from the client register of three of the five Rehabilitation Centres in the country which are under the Ministry of Health’s Centre for Medical Rehabilitation. Clients were eligible if they had received their device in the 12 months prior to the study. Based on the number of registered clients, the sample size was calculated as 274 with a 95% confidence interval, with the final sample N = 266. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were also conducted (N = 34).

 

Results: Most of the assistive devices were in use at the time of the survey and were reported to be in good condition (n = 177, 66.5%). The total mean score for satisfaction (services and device combined) was 3.80 (SD 0.55). Statistically significant differences were observed in satisfaction between gender and location of residence. Effectiveness and comfort were rated as the two most important factors when using a device; at the same time, these were the most common reasons for dissatisfaction and sub-optimal use.

 

Conclusion and Implications: Clients were quite satisfied with the assistive device and services provided, yet many reported barriers to optimal device use and difficulties in accessing follow-up services. There is a need to examine how prosthetic and orthotic devices can be improved further for better comfort and ambulation on uneven ground in low-resource contexts and to address access barriers."

Special appeal 2016 : Disability and mine action 2016

ICRC
November 2016

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This Special Appeal covers the funding requirements for physical rehabilitation activities for all persons with disabilities – among them, victims of armed conflict, other situations of violence and mines/ERW – as well as for initiatives related to mine action. It also summarizes the ICRC’s wider approach to addressing the needs of persons with disabilities, including its other efforts to facilitate the social and economic aspects of inclusion. The work of the Physical Rehabilitation Programme (PRP) and the Special Fund for the Disabled (SFD) is outlined. Topics associated with reducing the impact of weapon contamination and with promoting legal frameworks and government are discussed. 

Promoting good policy for leadership and governance of health related rehabilitation: a realist synthesis

MCVEIGH, Joanne
MACLACHLAN, Malcolm
GILMORE Brynne
MACLEAN Chiedza
EIDE, Arne H.
MANNAN Hasheem
GEISER Priscille
DUTTINE Anthony
MJI Gubela
MACAULIFFE Eilish
SPRUNT Beth
AMIN Mutamad
NORMAND Charles
et al
August 2016

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General principles requiring contextual adaptation regarding optimal policy related governance of health related rehabilitation in less resourced settings were developed from a literature review and realistic synthesis. A systematic review of literature published since 2003 was carried out. Multiple reviewers selected articles for inclusion in the realistic synthesis.  A Delphi survey of expert stakeholders refined and triangulated findings from the realist synthesis. Context mechanism outcome pattern configurations (CMOCs) were identified from the literature and then developed into statements for the Delphi survey, whereby 18 expert stakeholders refined these statements to achieve consensus on recommendations for policy related governance of health related rehabilitation. Several broad principles emerged throughout formulation of recommendations: participation of persons with disabilities in policy processes; collection of disaggregated disability statistics; explicit promotion in policies of access to services for all subgroups of persons with disabilities and service-users; robust inter-sectoral coordination; and ‘institutionalising’ programmes.

 

 

Priority assistive products list

WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (WHO)
May 2016

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The Priority Assistive Products List (APL) aspires to follow in the footsteps of the WHO Model List of Essential Medicines, which creates awareness among the public, mobilises resources and stimulates competition. The Priority Assistive Products List is similarly intended to be a catalyst in promoting access to assistive technology. It is not a restrictive list but aims to provide each Member State with a model from which to develop a National priority assistive products list. 

The List includes hearing aids, wheelchairs, communication aids, spectacles, artificial limbs, pill organizers, memory aids and other essential items for many older people and people with disabilities to be able to live a healthy, productive and dignified life.

The APL is part of the Global Cooperation on Assistive Technology (GATE)

Brief - Financial access to rehabilitation services

Handicap International
October 2015

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Presentations from the seminar are reported on the themes of: a diagnostic tool, universal health coverage, financial access experiences, Madagascar’s experience and advocacy. Presentations included: The economic diagnostic tool for physical and functional rehabilitation and its deployment in Burkhina Faso, Colombia and Laos;  Equity funds and cash transfers, link with UHC; Universal Health Coverage, contributory and case management schemes usable in order to finance physical and functional rehabilitation; Vietnam: Orthopaedic devices and fair cost recovery system;  Burundi: Financial access to healthcare and performance-based financing; Burkhina Faso: Equity fund for rehabilitation projects; Mali, Rwanda, Togo: Evaluation of three rehabilitation equity funds; Nepal: Cost calculation of assistive devices; Madagascar Experience (Operating and financial access of orthopaedic devices and physical rehabilitation services of Pzaga Mahajanga University Hospital,  Social Welfare Policy and Universal health coverage in Madagascar, Mutual Health Insurances)

Injuries, death, and disability associated with 11 years of conflict in Baghdad, Iraq : a randomized household cluster survey

LAFTA, Riyadh
et al
August 2015

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“The objective of this study was to characterize injuries, deaths, and disabilities arising during 11 years of conflict in Baghdad.” The quantitative study shows the methodology used in the collection of data, the findings discovered through evaluation of the data gathered, and interpretation of how to best use those findings to serve specific populations”

 

 PLOS ONE, 10(8)

Prosthetics & orthotics impact assessment : India and Bangladesh

COCHRANE, Helen
ROSARIO, Demetria
SINGH, Anil
GHOSH, Ritu
June 2015

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Mobility India is the only International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics​ (ISPO) recognised program in India offering training for ISPO Category II single discipline. From 2002 to the time of the study Mobility India enrolled two hundred and twenty-one students. This study was conducted in association with ISPO’s USAID funded programme: ‘Rehabilitation of physically disabled people in developing countries’. Activities included: field visits to India and Bangladesh, interviewing Ministry officials, Heads of Clinical Services and Heads of Prosthetic and Orthotic Departments;  a partial audit of graduate clinical skills and competencies and determining the professional development needs of graduates in selected South-East Asian countries; and listening to service users, hearing stories of how services had directly impacted upon their lives. Services in India and Pakistan are outlined and 22 recommendations to help to further develop prosthetic and orthotic services are provided.

The need for a rehabilitation model to address the disparities of public healthcare for people living with HIV in South Africa

CHETTY, Verusia
HANASS-HANCOCK, Jill
June 2015

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This article advocates for the development and implementation of a model of care to guide rehabilitation of people living with HIV in South Africa. The paper begins by presenting the emerging evidence of rehabilitation in the context of HIV, and goes on to identify appropriate steps to develop a model of care based on this that would be applicable to South Africa

African Journal of Disability 4(1), Art. #137

Why should rehabilitation be integrated into health systems?

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
2015

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This advocacy briefing paper presents information about the importance of rehabilitation being integrated into health systems. It highlights a brief overview and definition of rehabilitation, and related key health facts and issues such as lack of access to rehabilitation, the value of rehabilitation and legal frameworks. It provides recommendations for stakeholders and suggests ways to measure progress

Advocacy briefing paper

A 10-year literature review of the impact of community based rehabilitation

BOWERS, Bob
KUIPERS, Pim
DORSETT, Pat
2015

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This paper is a thematic 10-year literature review of the impact of community based rehabilitation. “The review covered the period from 2002 to 2012, and the CBR Matrix was utilised to provide structure for the evidence. Seven studies that investigated the impact of CBR interventions in developing countries were included. A modified harvest plot was used to summarise the strength and nature of evidence provided in relation to the CBR Matrix. Quantitative studies tended to focus on the Health domain, while qualitative studies generally focused on the Social and Empowerment domains. No evidence of CBR impact was found in the Education domain, and very little evidence was found pertaining to Livelihood. Overall, the evidence base related to the impact of CBR remains limited, both in terms of quantity and robustness of design”

 

Disability, CBR and Inclusive Development (DCID), Vol 26, No 2

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