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Motivation Peer Training – Bridging the gap for people with mobility disabilities

NORRIS, Lucy K.
2017

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Background: Only 2% of people with disabilities in developing countries have access to basic services and rehabilitation.


Objectives: To bridge this gap, Motivation has been running Peer Training activities since 1993 and has identified that there is a growing need for Peer Training. The overall aim of Peer Training is for wheelchair users (Peer Trainers) to provide others (with similar disabilities) with the relevant knowledge on health issues, rights and skills to achieve a basic level of independence and greater quality of life.


Method: To test the impact of Peer Training, Motivation created a knowledge, skills and well-being questionnaire, which has been trialled in two locations: Kenya and Malawi.


Results: Overall, Motivation found that most participants reported an increase in knowledge, skills and well-being, supporting their experience that this training provides vital information and support mechanisms for wheelchair users in low- and middle-income countries. Further work is needed to ensure this tool measures the impact of Peer Training and lessons learnt have been identified to strengthen the methodology.


Conclusion: Although Peer Training is not a replacement for rehabilitation services, Motivation believes it is an effective way to not only increase knowledge and skills of persons with disabilities but also reduce the sense of social isolation that can often be a result of disability.

Successful projects : what makes them work? a cross-national analysis of the studies of projects that have improved the quality of life of people with intellectual disabilities in India, Romania, Kenya and South Africa

GUSTAVSSON, Anders
et al
January 2007

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“This cross national analysis is based on national studies made by research teams in India, Kenya, Romania and South Africa. It aims to draw out the lessons learnt from successful social development processes in these countries. In each country, studies have been made of projects identified as interesting, successful and/or outstanding in the way they have improved the quality of life of people with intellectual disabilities. This comparative report briefly describes the national studies, from which the respective teams made their own national conclusions and continues with across national analysis attempting to identify circumstances or factors that are common to these successful projects. Finally, the report summarises the conclusions and their implications”

Evaluating the impact of a community-based rehabilitation intervention

HARTLEY, Sally
2003

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This project evaluation summarizes the impact of community-based action by local women’s groups to improve the communication ability and quality of life of disabled children with communication problems. The project was designed to increase the present knowledge concerning appropriate interventions for children with communication problems who live in low-income countries. This report is useful to anyone interested in community-based nterventions for children with communication problems

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