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Learning From Experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies for hygiene at home for people with high support needs.

World Vision/CBM Australia
May 2018

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This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HYGIENE AT HOME FOR PEOPLE WITH HIGH SUPPORT NEEDS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes strategies that used to assist households and individuals in hygiene tasks at home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka.

NOTE: The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

Learning from experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies to modify existing household toilets and water access

WORLD VISION
CBM Australia
2018

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This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HOME MODIFICATIONS FOR WASH ACCESS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes the strategies which were used to assist people with disabilities to access toilet and water facilities at their own home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka. Houses and toilet structures in the region were made of brick and concrete. No new toilets were built and modifications involved only minor work to existing household structures, water points and toilets.

NOTE:
The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

Estimation of Zika virus prevalence by appearance of microcephaly

SAAD-ROY, C M
van den DRIESSCHE, P
MA, J L
December 2016

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There currently is a severe Zika Virus (ZIKV) epidemic in Brazil and other South American countries. Due to international travel, this poses severe public health risk of ZIKV importation to other countries. We estimate the prevalence of ZIKV in an import region by the time a microcephaly case is detected, since microcephaly is presently the most significant indication of ZIKV presence. A mathematical model to describe ZIKV spread from a source region to an import region was established. This model incorporates both vector transmission (between humans and mosquitoes) and sexual transmission (from males to females). Account was taken of population structure through a contact network for sexually active individuals. Parameter values of the model are either taken from the literature or estimated from travel data

BMC Infectious Diseases (2016) 16:754 DOI 10.1186/s12879-016-2076-z

‘First, do no harm’ : are disability assessments associated with adverse trends in mental health? A longitudinal ecological study

BARR, B
et al
November 2015

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“In England between 2010 and 2013, just over one million recipients of the main out-of-work disability benefit had their eligibility reassessed using a new functional checklist—the Work Capability Assessment. Doctors and disability rights organisations have raised concerns that this has had an adverse effect on the mental health of claimants, but there are no population level studies exploring the health effects of this or similar policies… Here the researchers used multivariable regression to investigate whether variation in the trend in reassessments in each of 149 local authorities in England was associated with differences in local trends in suicides, self-reported mental health problems and antidepressant prescribing rates, while adjusting for baseline conditions and trends in other factors known to influence mental ill-health”

 

Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, doi:10.1136/jech-2015-206209

World health statistics 2015

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2015

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This report contains WHO’s annual compilation of health-related data for its 194 Member States, and includes a summary of the progress made towards achieving the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and associated targets

WHO global strategy and action plan on ageing and health

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION
2015

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The purpose of the Global Strategy and Action Plan on Ageing and Health 2016-2020 is “to define the goals, strategies, and activities that WHO (its Member States and secretariat) will pursue on ageing and health, and to clearly lay these out as a global framework for public health action relevant to low-, middle-, and high-income settings ”

Surviving polio in a post-polio world

GROCE, Nora
BANKS, Lena Morgan
STEIN, Michael Ashley
April 2014

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This paper reviews what is currently known about disabled survivors of polio and highlights areas of need in public health research, policy and programming. Based on a literature review, discussion and field observations, the authors identify continuing challenges posed by polio and argue that the attention, funding and commitment now being directed towards eradication be shifted to provide for the rehabilitative, medical, educational and social needs of those for whom the disabling sequelae of polio will remain a daily challenge for decades to come

Social Science & Medicine, Vol 107

Research & humanities in medical education (RHiME)

DHALIWAL, Upreet
et al
March 2014

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Research and Humanities in Medical Education (RHiME) is an open access, peer-reviewed online journal with the vision to blend humanities with the sciences in medical education. It aims to encourage contributions from and discussion between teachers and students, doctors and patients, the sick and their care-providers, and between health policy makers and policy users

An evidence review of research on health interventions in humanitarian crises

BLANCHET, Karl
et al
November 2013

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This report presents a review of the evidence base of public health interventions in humanitarian crises by assessing the quantity and quality of intervention studies, rather than measuring the actual effectiveness of the intervention itself.  It notes an increase in quality and volume of evidence on health interventions in humanitarian crises and recognises that evidence remains too limited, particularly for gender-based violence (GBV) and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). This report identifies a number of common needs across all areas, namely more evidence for the effectiveness of systems and delivery, better developed research methods, and more evidence on dispersed, urban and rural populations, on ensuring continuity of care and measuring and addressing health care needs in middle-income settings (particularly NCDs)

Note: Use links on the left hand side of the webpage to access either the full report, the executive summary, or the individual chapters arranged by health topic

The barefoot guide 3 : mobilizing religious health assets for transformation

COCHRANE, James R
GUNDERSON, Gary R
November 2012

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This Barefoot Guide 3 presents the connection between religion and public health. It focuses on understanding and working with that reality highlighting that “religious assets for health are everywhere, they matter to a lot of people, and they can be mobilized for the health of all.” The guide contains the following chapters on: thinking differently about the health of the public; revisiting the history of the link between religion and public health; working with and mobilizing religious health assets; supporting the ‘leading causes of life’; understanding ‘healthworlds’ and the strengths of ‘people who come together’; boundary leadership; thinking about systems; and ‘deep accountability

Disability in people affected by leprosy : the role of impairment, activity, social participation, stigma and discrimination

VAN BRAKEL, W. H.
et al
2012

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"Leprosy-related disability is a challenge to public health, and social and rehabilitation services in endemic countries. Disability is more than a mere physical dysfunction, and includes activity limitations, stigma, discrimination, and social participation restrictions." This paper assesses the extent of disability and its determinants among persons with leprosy-related disabilities after release from multi drug treatment
Global Health Action, Vol 5

United Nations High Level Meeting on non-communicable diseases

DUTTINE, Antony
PASQUIER, Estelle
December 2011

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"During the 66th UN General Assembly in New York a High Level Meeting on Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) was convened. This was only the second time that a health issue had been discussed at such an international forum. The resulting political declaration recognised this global health challenge, which has reached pandemic proportions, and took steps to recommend action on prevention, treatment and coordination for the management of NCDs. Many NCDs can be potentially disabling for individuals who live with them and persons with disabilities can be also susceptible to developing NCDs. Handicap International, with the approval of several other disability focussed organisations, attended the meeting and advocated for the inclusion of disability within the NCD agenda. This document describes the outcomes of the High Level Meeting and collaborations engaged in before, during and afterwards. It recommends future action to continue to push for the inclusion of disability into the NCD agenda though a collaborative approach"

Non-Communicable diseases in an ageing world : a report from the International Longevity Centre UK, HelpAge International and Alzheimer’s Disease International lunch debate

BAMFORD, Sally-Marie
SERRA, Valentina
July 2011

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This report, based on the discussion and recommendations from the expert meeting, presents information about the need for a life-course focus on prevention, treatment, management and related care issues on NCDs and for dementia to be addressed as a global priority for action. "The first part of the report highlights salient policy and political issues on the NCD question and summarises some of the key international developments in this regard. The latter section of the report provides a summary of the presentation by Professor Martin Prince, and identifies some of the key themes which emerged from the meeting"
Expert stakeholder lunch meeting
London, UK
4 May 2011

Disability, displacement and public health : a vision for Haiti

WOLBRING, Gregor
2011

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This article "highlights the situation of people with disabilities displaced by natural disasters, with a particular focus on Haiti which on January 12, 2010 was hit by a catastrophic earthquake of magnitude seven on the Richter scale. The article explores the opportunity for developing a series of best practices with regards to displaced people with disabilities in Haiti - practices that might be applicable to other natural disasters in the future"
Canadian Journal of Public Health, Vol 102, No 2

Call for the recognition of ageing, Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias in the 2011 UN Summit on NCDs

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE INTERNATIONAL
et al
2011

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This joint position paper highlights that ageing and the associated risk of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias is a key factor for the 21st century’s social and economic sustainability and should therefore be an essential component of the UN’s NCD considerations. This paper outlines seven related considerations for the UN Summit on NCDs and highlights eight recommendations. This paper is useful to anyone interested in NCDs and ageing

The IMF, the global crisis and human resources for health : still constraining policy space

LEFRANÇOIS, Fabien
February 2010

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This report "...examines evidence from nine IMF country programmes, chosen based on their HIV prevalence rates, and finds that although the IMF has changed its tune and is talking about greater flexibility, these changes are not enough and are only temporary. "In 2006, the World Health Organisation (WHO) estimated that 57 countries were facing a severe health workforce crisis.... Addressing this shortage, and action alongside it to strengthen health systems around the world, requires substantial, concerted effort from both aid donors and recipient governments. The current global downturn threatens to undermine steps taken in this direction so far and jeopardise progress towards the health-related Millennium Development Goals. "...the IMF has adapted its rhetoric so that it now claims its programmes are more flexible on fiscal and monetary policies, which determine to what extent governments can maintain or increase spending - including of foreign aid - and stimulate economic activity"

Climate change and global health : linking science with policy

KJELLSTROM, Tord (for Heat, work and health: implications of climate change)
SAUERBORN, Rainer (for Climate change and infectious diseases)
Eds
November 2009

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This series of papers focuses on the health impacts of climate change and the need to prevent them. This volume was prepared ahead of the Conference of the Parties-15 in Copenhagen in December 2009, which met to discuss and decide global action to prevent climate change

The epidemic divide

HEALTH AND CARE DEPARTMENT, INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT SOCIETIES (ICRC)
July 2009

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The burden of epidemics of infectious diseases on the social and economic development of poorer countries is growing, but is not being sufficiently addressed. This paper argues that to reduce the impact of epidemics involves addressing complex issues that include prevention of disease, empowering communities, better access to health services at the community level, availability of health personnel and better infrastructure (especially for water and sanitation)

Managing the health effects of climate change

COSTELLO, Anthony
et al
May 2009

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This report, produced by the Lancet and University College London Institute for Global Health Commission, focuses on managing the health effects of climate change. It says that climate change is the biggest global-health threat of the 21st century. The commission reviewed the likely health impacts of climate change on human societies - and documented ways to reverse those impacts. It concluded that there is a need for policymakers, practitioners and the public to act urgently on the human health effects of climate change

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