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Inclusive disaster risk management : governments, communities and groups acting together

UNITED NATIONS (UN)
March 2015

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This Issue Brief, presented in advance of the United Nations (UN) Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction, outlines the UN position on the importance of developing more inclusive Disaster Risk Management (DRM) strategies. After initially outlining the importance of inclusivity, the paper goes on the present a number of key ways forward, including greater capacity development, greater understanding of risk, and the creation of innovative partnerships and institutional relationships

UN World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction

14-18 March 2015

Sendai, Japan

Abuse and denial of sexual and reproductive rights of women with psychosocial disabilities in Mexico

RODRIGUEZ, Priscila
et al
February 2015

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This report presents the situation faced by women with psycho-social conditions in Mexico based on the results of a year-long study. This research included the application of a questionnaire to fifty-one women with psychosocial disabilities who were either members of the Colectivo Chuhcan or received outpatient services at four different health clinics and psychiatric institutions in Mexico City. The main finding of this report is that the Mexican government has failed to implement policies that ensure that women with psychosocial disabilities have safe access to sexual and reproductive health services, on an equal basis with others. It is recommended this research be extended to the rest of the country to gain a clearer picture on the situation of the sexual and reproductive rights of women with disabilities at a national level

Disability-inclusive development toolkit

AL JU’BEH, Kathy
January 2015

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This toolkit is designed as a resource for CBM that can be used in a variety of ways: to support staff induction, team meetings, refresher days and training workshops. It can also be used as a tool for personal reflection and self-study. Tips for those intending to use it as a training resource are shaded differently.

 

The toolkit is presented in four main chapters targeting different audiences. Chapter 1: DID an introduction; Chapter 2: DID for managers; Chapter 3: DID for programme staff; Chapter 4: Inclusive training and facilitation. The content of the four chapters can be combined and adapted as needed. The materials can be used flexibly and are not intended to be prescriptive. They are primarily intended for use by CBM staff and highlight CBM guidelines and reference documents. They are intended to give CBM staff and partners more confidence in applying disability inclusion in their work

and speaking with one voice.

 

Each chapter includes links to signpost other reliable resources/ websites and portals where people can find further relevant information, both external links for all users and internal links for CBM employees only. A glossary of key terms is also presented at the end in alphabetical order to aid understanding and clarity on key terms used throughout the DID toolkit

Fair’n square : a fair and equal world for all children

UNICEF
HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
2015

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This website presents information about a joint UNICEF-Handicap International programme on child disability in two cities of Mozambique, Maputo and Matola. The focus of the project was to first identify children with disabilities and then ensure that these children could access services. The website features a useful video and practical case studies

The ScoPeO tool : measuring the impact of our interventions : quality of life, safety and social and family protection

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
2015

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This advocacy briefing paper presents information about Handicap International’s ScoPeO tool which is a data collection tool to help measure outcomes of development initiatives on the quality of life (QOL) of beneficiaries who have accessed our projects and those of our partners. This brief highlights the need to measure quality of life and provides an overview of how ScoPeO works along with a case study from Rwanda. It outlines how humanitarian and development actors can measure impact and suggests ways to measure progress

Advocacy briefing paper

Capturing the difference we make : community-based rehabilitation indicators manual

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2015

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This manual presents indicators that "capture the difference (Community-Based Rehabilitation) CBR makes in the lives of people with disabilities in the communities where it is implemented. This manual presents these (base and supplementary) indicators and provides simple guidance on collecting the data needed to inform them. The indicators have been developed to show the difference between people living with a disability and their families and those without disabilities in relation to the information reported in the indicators. This comparability provides valuable information to CBR managers, donors and government agencies alike, which can be used to guide decision-making, support advocacy and improve accountability. Further, the ability of the indicators to provide a comparison of the populations of persons with disability to persons without disability aligns with the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD), which states that persons with disability have equal rights to those without disabilities...this manual serves to standardize the monitoring of differences made by in the lives of people with disabilities and their families, making it possible to compare the difference CBR makes across areas and countries. This manual aligns with the WHO Global Disability Action Plan 2014–2021, and may also be used to monitor other development plans in an easy and efficient way”

‘Ask us what we need’: Operationalizing Guidance on Disability Inclusion in Refugee and Displaced Persons Programs

PEARCE, Emma
2015

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Persons with disabilities remain one of the most vulnerable and socially excluded groups in any displaced community. Barriers to accessing humanitarian assistance programs increase their protection risks, including risk of violence, abuse and exploitation. Women’s Refugee Commission has been supporting the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and implementing partners to translate guidance on disability inclusion into practice at field levels through the provision of technical support to eight country operations. In the course of the project, WRC has consulted with over 600 persons with disabilities and care-givers and over 130 humanitarian actors in displacement contexts. Key protection concerns identified include a lack of participation in community decision making; stigma and discrimination of children and young persons with disabilities by their non-disabled peers; violence against persons with disabilities, including gender-based violence; lack of access to disabilityspecific health care; and unmet basic needs among families of persons with multiple impairments. Suggested strategies to further advance disability inclusion in humanitarian programming include: strengthening identification of protection risks and case management services for persons with disabilities; facilitating contextspecific action planning around key guidelines; and engaging the disability movement in advocacy on refugee issues.

 

Disability and the Global South (DGS), 2015, Vol. 2 No. 1

Human Rights

www.macao-tz.org
December 2014

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Malezi AIDS Care Awareness Organization (MACAO) is a non-profit organization reaching out to neglected Indigenous people in Ngorongoro District, Arusha Region of Northern Tanzania.  Macao founded in 2003, Macao is a humanitarian organization that provides assistance to approximately 200,000 Indigenous Maasai community in Ngorongoro district for addressing needs of water and sanitation, food security, health Care Research, Education, Research environment, Maasai Traditional Research, Human Rights and sustainable economic development by strengthening their livelihoods.  In addition to responding to major relief situations, MACAO focuses on long-term community development through over 4 Area Development Project. We welcome the donors and volunteers to join us in this programs, we are wolking in ruro villages.

Disability disaggregation of data : baseline report

JOLLEY, Emma
THIVILLIER, Pauline
SMITH, Fred
December 2014

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“This baseline report contains information on the initial steps (prior to the start of data collection) undertaken to include disaggregation of data by disability in two projects in Tanzania and India. The report includes information on project selection, development of an Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) plan, adaptation of data collection tools and training of Country Office staff, partners and data collectors. This baseline also captures the knowledge, attitudes and practices of programme managers, decision makers and data collectors around disability, the availability of data, and the experiences of Sightsavers’ implementing staff”

Note: The user has given permission for the uploaded document to be reproduced and made publicly available on the Source website

Including disability in HIV policy and programming : good practices drawn from country-based evidence

MAC-SEING, Muriel
December 2014

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The purpose of this document is to share good practices and processes concerning the inclusion of disability issues in HIV policy and programming, drawing on specific experiences in Senegal, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda and Cambodia and on lessons learned at international AIDS conferences. More specifically, it is intended to 1) provide a clear indication to HIV and AIDS practitioners that disability mainstreaming in HIV and AIDS is indeed possible and workable in various contexts and by implementing specific steps/initiatives; 2) transfer concrete knowledge and practices to disability stakeholders, including disabled people's organisations, on how to work in HIV and AIDS; and 3) persuade HIV-related development partners that more investment is needed to develop this knowledge base in order to bring about practical changes at micro, meso and macro levels, as well as among the population. The good practices are also intended to inspire and motivate other organisations and agencies to use and replicate them in other contexts and countries, if/when they are adapted to the needs and situations of people with disabilities and communities

LL 07

Including disability in HIV policy and programming : good practices drawn from country-based evidence : brief

MAC-SEING, Muriel
December 2014

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This brief is an introduction to the lessons learned document on good practices about the inclusion of disability in HIV policy and programming. Good practices and processes concerning the inclusion of disability issues in HIV policy and programming are highlighted, drawing on specific experiences in Senegal, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda and Cambodia and on lessons learned at international AIDS conferences

LL No 7 Brief 

Through our eyes

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
November 2014

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This video was made with children from Rwanda, Burundi and Kenya in 2014, in the context of a child participation activity within the “Ubuntu Care project: confronting sexual violence against children with disabilities in Rwanda, Burundi and Kenya”, implemented by the NGO Handicap International and its partners. The initiative brought disabled children together to start discussing their experiences and the cameras became an outlet for the children and members of the community to share their stories and raise awareness about important issues about confronting sexual violence against children with disabilities

Note: dialogue is in French with an option for English subtitles

Strengthening participation of children and young people with disability in advocacy

SIMMONS, Dr. Catharine
ROBINSON, Dr. Sally
October 2014

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Participation by children and young people in advocacy and change-making can not only improve and foster positive change in their own lives, but also influence the lives of others. When young people’s participation is supported, meaningful and engaged, multiple benefits accrue; their perspectives and experiences bring a unique contribution and can result in rights-based empowerment, enacted citizenship and improved relationships. This has the potential to shape policy, to increase the relevance and responsiveness of organisations they use, and to influence change in their communities in positive ways

 

However, there are significant issues and a range of barriers that discourage, prevent or actively exclude children and young people with disability from participating. A culture of low expectations, social and cultural barriers, relationship and identity difficulties and practical hurdles exist for many young people. As a result, many are precluded from participation, particularly around change-making activities

 

This paper examines how meaningful participation of children and young people with disability in advocacy and change-making can be strengthened. In the paper CDA calls for the promotion of children and young people’s participation as active and valued community members

Learning from doing the EquitAble project: Content, context, process, and impact of a multi-country research project on vulnerable populations in Africa

MACLACHLAN, Mac
AMIN, Mutamad
MJI, Gubela
MANNAN, Hasheem
MCVEIGH, Joanne
MCAULIFFE, Eilish
AMADHILA, Elina
MUNTHALI, Alister
EIDE, Arne H
DUBE, A Kudakwashe
2014

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Background: The ‘EquitAble’ project carried out content analyses of policies and collected and analysed qualitative and quantitative data concerning access to health services in Sudan, Malawi, Namibia and South Africa. Our particular concern was to address the situation of people with disabilities, although not in isolation from other marginalised or vulnerable groups.

 

Objectives: This article reports on the content, context, process and impact of project EquitAble, funded by the European Commission Seventh Research Framework Programme, which brought together researchers from Ireland, Norway, South Africa, Namibia, Sudan and Malawi.

 

Method: After the 4-year project ended in February 2013, all members of the consortium were asked to anonymously complete a bespoke questionnaire designed by the coordinating team. The purpose of the questionnaire was to capture the views of those who collaborated on the research project in relation to issues of content, context, process and impact of the EquitAble project.

 

Results: Our results indicated some of the successes and challenges encountered by our consortium.

 

Conclusion: We identified contextual and process learning points, factors often not discussed in papers, which typically focus on the reporting of the ‘content’ of results.

Violence Against Persons with Disabilities in Bidar District, India

DEEPAK, S
KUMAR, J
SANTOSH, B
GORNALLI, S
MANIKAPPA, P
VYJANTHA, U
GIRIYAPPA, R
2014

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Violence and sexual violence against persons with disabilities at community level are serious issues. Though CBR programmes and DPOs are expected to prevent violence and offer support to the victims, there is very little informationabout their role in this regard.

 

Purpose: This research aimed to assess the level of violence and sexual violence experienced by DPO members, and the role played by CBR programmes in preventing it.

 

Method: The study involved a non-random consecutive sample of 146 persons with disabilities from 3 sub-districts of Bidar district in Karnataka, India. Using a structured questionnaire, interviews were conducted by a group of trained DPO members and CBR workers, many of whom had personal experience of violence. The data was entered using Epi-Info and then converted into spreadsheet Tables for analysis.

 

Results: 58% of the sample reported having experienced violence and 14% reported experiences of sexual violence during the previous 12 months. Girls and women reported higher levels of violence at different age groups. Male children and young adults reported having experienced more violence, including sexual violence, than older men. The research did not provide conclusive evidence that participation in the CBR and DPO activities played a protective role.

 

Conclusions: Violence and sexual violence against persons with disabilities are serious problems. More research on the subject, in terms of roles of CBR programmes and DPOs, is needed.

Independent but not alone : global report on the right to decide

INCLUSION INTERNATIONAL
June 2014

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This report presents the perspective of people with intellectual disabilities and their families on the right to decide, in line with Article 12 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). Over the past two years, over 600 self-advocates, family members, disability advocates, and professionals participated in discussions motivated by Inclusion International’s Global Campaign on the Right to Decide. Additionally, Inclusion International heard from over 80 organisations from more than 40 countries. The report presents a series of recommendations and conclusions in order to advance the right to decide

Children with Disability in Nepal: New Hope Through CBR?

MOL, Tanja Ingeborg
BRAKEL, Wim Van
SCHREURS, Merel
2014

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Purpose: This study assesses the impact of a community-based rehabilitation (CBR) programme on the quality of life (QoL) of children with disability and their families.

 

Methods: A qualitative approach was applied, using two techniques - a ranking line and semi-structured interviews. Nineteen children (ranging from 4 –18 years of age) were interviewed in their homes located in three villages - Chapakhori, Bokraha and Madesha - in Nepal.

 

Results: Children with disability and their families ranked physical health, psychological health, empowerment and level of independence as the most important factors for their QoL. Of the 19 children, 13 had experienced positive changes in their life and 1 child reported a negative change. The positive changes related mainly to their physical health and functioning. The impact of these changes was felt in the ‘social’, ‘level of independence’ and ‘empowerment’ outcome categories. The children mentioned that they had more friends, experienced less stigma, could go to school and were more hopeful about the future.

 

Conclusions: This CBR programme has brought about changes in the QoL of all children with disability and their families. The majority of them reported a positive impact.

 

 

Inclusion works : lessons learned on the inclusion of people with disabilities in a food security project for ultra poor women in Bangladesh

BRUIJN, Paulien
May 2014

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People with disabilities are often amongst the poorest in the developing world, and yet they are usually left out of development projects. Inclusion of persons with disabilities in mainstream development programmes is a relatively new concept in development. The ICCO Gaibandha Food Security Project in Bangladesh is one of the first programmes that has mainstreamed disability on a large scale. This book represents the lessons that are learned about mainstreaming disability in this programme. It is a source of inspiration and offers practical suggestions to make a start with including people with disabilities in (food security) projects

The disability and vulnerability focal points (DVFP)

AURENCHE, Benoit
et al
May 2014

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Disability and Vulnerability Focal Points (DVFPs) are one of the ways in which Handicap International addresses the need to take effective, concrete action on behalf of those made vulnerable – including people with disabilities – in emergencies. DVFPs are organised as a network including DVFP structures and almost always mobile teams, whose role is making sure that aid reaches vulnerable people, rather than waiting for vulnerable people to reach the aid. This guide is intended as a practical tool for setting up a complete DVFP mechanism

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