Resources search

Leaving no-one behind: Building inclusive social protection systems for persons with disabilities

KIDD, Stephen
et al
February 2019

Expand view

How to make social protection systems and schemes more inclusive of persons with disabilities is examined. Social protection can play a key role in empowering persons with disabilities by addressing the additional costs they face, yet the majority of persons with disabilities are currently excluded from schemes.

The report identifies a wide range of barriers persons with disabilities experience in accessing social protection to be overcome. It calls for better data on disability, disability-specific and old age pension schemes and expanded coverage; adapting communications about social protection schemes; and improving disability assessment mechanisms. The research underpinning the report comprised involved a review of the literature, an analysis of household survey datasets, and consultations with key stakeholders and persons with disabilities in seven low- and middle-income countries: Brazil, India, Kenya, Mauritius, Rwanda, South Africa and Zambia.

Topics covered include:

  • Types of social protection schemes for persons with disabilities
  • Levels of investment in social protection for persons with disabilities
  • Coverage of persons with disabilities by social protection
  • Impacts of social protection on persons with disabilities
  • Barriers to accessing social protection and measures to address them
  • Links between social protection schemes and other public services

Leaving no-one behind: Building inclusive social protection systems for persons with disabilities

KIDD, Stephen
et al
February 2019

Expand view

This report identifies a wide range of barriers persons with disabilities experience in accessing social protection to be overcome. It calls for better data on disability, disability-specific and old age pension schemes and expanded coverage; adapting communications about social protection schemes; and improving disability assessment mechanisms. The project involved a review of the literature, an analysis of household survey datasets, and consultations with key stakeholders and persons with disabilities in seven low- and middle-income countries: Brazil, India, Kenya, Mauritius, Rwanda, South Africa and Zambia.

Participation, agency and disability in Brazil: transforming psychological practices into public policy from a human rights perspective

GESSER, Marivate
BLOCK, Pamela
NEUERNBERG, Adriano Henrique
January 2019

Expand view

Theoretical and methodological contributions to the promotion of social participation and agency of disabled people in the work of psychologists who influence Brazilian public policy are pesented. This discussion is in line with the Brazilian legislation on disability, which highlights the social participation of disabled people as a guiding principle of the public policies addressing them. Brazilian legislation on disability is presented, with an emphasis on the practice of psychology in Brazilian public policy. Theoretical perspectives on participation and agency are discussed as well as the connection between them. Elements that have historically hindered the participation and agency of disabled people are presented. The article concludes with some theoretical and methodological contributions, which are in line with the Brazilian legislation on disability, to promote participatory processes for disabled people

“They Stay until They Die” A lifetime of isolation and neglect in institutions for people with disabilities in Brazil

RIOS-ESPINOSA, Carlos
et al
May 2018

Expand view

This report documents a range of abuses against children and adults with disabilities in residential institutions in Brazil. The research is based on direct observations during visits to 19 institutions (known in Brazil as shelters and care homes), including 8 for children, as well as 5 inclusive residences for people with disabilities. In addition, Human Rights Watch researchers interviewed 171 people, including children with disabilities and their families, adults with disabilities in institutions, disability rights advocates, representatives of non–governmental organizations, including disabled persons organizations, staff in institutions, and government officials.

 

Research was carried out between November 2016 and March 2018 in the states of São Paulo (including São Paulo and Campinas), Rio de Janeiro (including Rio de Janeiro, Duque de Caxias, Niteroi and Nova Friburgo), Bahia (Salvador) and Distrito Federal (including Brasilia and Ceilândia).

Disability & the Global South (DGS), 2018, Vol. 5 No. 1

2018

Expand view

Articles include:

  • Inclusive Education in the global South? A Colombian perspective: ‘When you look towards the past, you see children with disabilities, and if you look towards the future, what you see is diverse learners
  • Services for people with Communication Disabilities in Uganda: supporting a new Speech and Language Therapy profession
  • Health Information-Seeking Behaviour of Visually Impaired Persons in Ibadan Metropolis, Nigeria
  • Online Collective Identities for Autism: The Perspective of Brazilian Parents
  • Transnationalizing Disability Policy in Embedded Cultural-Cognitive Worldviews: the Case of Sub-Saharan Africa
  • Portrayal of Disabled People in the Kuwaiti Media

Enabling education review, issue 4

ENABLING EDUCATION NETWORK
December 2015

Expand view

This newsletter contains a variety of articles about inclusive education in several countries around the world. The topics focus mostly on funding, managing and sustaining inclusive education; engaging and empowering beneficiaries in finding solutions; facilitating parental and child involvement and early childhood education

Enabling Education Review, issue 4

An examination of violence practiced against disabled Brazilians in relation to sustainable development

KIRAKOSYAN, Lyusyena
October 2014

Expand view

Although there are no national data and statistics regarding violence against disabled citizens in Brazil, findings from a number of small-scale research studies suggest that it is a problem of considerable magnitude. This article draws on the existing literature on violence and oppression, empirical studies on violence against disabled people in Brazil and interviews with a sample of disabled Brazilians to argue that the most prevalent forms of violence in the nation are subtle and concealed forms of oppression that reproduce discriminatory power structures in Brazilian society. Such power structures prevent the developing world in general and Brazil in particular from securing democratic and sustainable development in the post-2015 era, when disadvantaged people must be at the center. The analysis is organized in three parts. First, I outline briefly the main issues in defining impairment, disability and violence, since these represent political choices that shape policy decisions. Second, I analyze the forms of violence that affect disabled Brazilians and the relationships and institutions that create and sustain them. Third, I describe and evaluate the government's key current strategies aimed at addressing violence against disabled Brazilians. The purpose here is to suggest ways in which violence against disabled Brazilians can be addressed in public policies as a sustainable development issue and thus help close the "gap" between disabled and nondisabled populations to create truly sustainable democratic societies that honor human dignity.​

 

Universal health coverage for inclusive and sustainable development. A synthesis of 11 country case studies.

MAEDA, Akiko
ARAUJO, Edson
CASHIN, Cheryl
HARRIS, Joseph
IKEGAMI, Naoki
REICH, Michael R.
et al
2014

Expand view

Universal health coverage (UHC) for inclusive and sustainable development synthesises the experiences from 11 countries—Bangladesh, Brazil, Ethiopia, France, Ghana, Indonesia, Japan, Peru, Thailand, Turkey, and Vietnam—in implementing policies and strategies to achieve and sustain UHC. These countries represent diverse geographic and economic conditions, but all have committed to UHC as a key national aspiration and are approaching it in different ways. The UHC policies for each country are examined around three common themes: (1) the political economy and policy process for adopting, achieving, and sustaining UHC; (2) health financing policies to enhance health coverage; and (3) human resources for health policies for achieving UHC. The path to UHC is specific to each country, but countries can benefit from experiences of others and avoid potential risks

Integrating mental health into primary care : a global perspective

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
WORLD ORGANIZATION OF FAMILY DOCTORS (WONCA)
2008

Expand view

This report provides the rationale and know-how on integrating mental health into primary health care. It outlines primary care for mental health in context and then presents primary care for mental health in practice, highlighting 12 case studies and key lessons learnt from specific countries. A detailed annex on the core functions of primary care workers is provided, as well as 10 core principles of mental health integration. This resource is useful to anyone interested in integrating mental health into primary care

Universal design and visitability : from accessibility to zoning

NASAR, Jack L., EVANS-COWLEY, Jennifer
Eds
2007

Expand view

This book is a collection of best practices gathered from an international conference on universal design. It features guiding principles, statistics and examples of universal design. This comprehensive book offers detailed chapters on the following key issues: principles of universal design; inclusive housing and neighbourhoods; architecture and spatial cognition without sight; and research and teaching of accessibility. It features case studies in Brazil, Thailand, Norway and Maryland, USA. This book would be useful for those interested in universal design, accessibility, and disability and development

Programming experiences in early childhood development

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
November 2006

Expand view

This document presents examples and case studies from 21 countries. They demonstrate the benefit of cross-sectoral programming to support early childhood development, some building on early child care or education programme

Addressing violence against women in HIV testing and counselling

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2006

Expand view

This is a summary and recommendations from an international consultation co-convened by the WHO departments of Gender, Women and Health (GWH) and of HIV & AIDS to identify and review promising strategies or good practices to support women who may fear or experience violence as a consequence of HIV testing and/or HIV status disclosure; and develop recommendations to guide programmes and policies related to HIV testing and counselling, in light of current strategies to expand access to these and related services

Cash benefits to disabled persons in Brazil : an analysis of the BPC continuous cash benefit programme

MEDEIROS, Marcelo
DINIZ, Debora
SQUINCA, Flávia
2006

Expand view

This resource is an analysis of the Continuous Cash Benefit Programme, an unconditional cash transfer to disabled Brazilians and other vulnerable groups. The data used for this paper are based on court decisions and laws relating to this policy since implementation. The aim is to provide recommendations on the design, operation and future evaluations of the programme. This resource would be useful for anyone with an interest in social protection, disability and development

Estrategias nacionales para la Sociedad de la Información en América Latina y el Caribe

HILBERT, Martin
BUSTOS, Sebastián
FERRAZ, João Carlos
March 2005

Expand view

In order to take advantage of the benefits and opportunities offered by ICTs, the countries of Latin America and the Caribbean have established and implemented projects, policies and strategies to make an efficient transition towards the Information Society. The objective of this work is to review these efforts developed within the public agenda of 13 selected countries: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Jamaica, Mexico, Panama, Peru, Dominican Republic, Trinidad and Tobago, and Venezuela

WHO’s multi-country study on women’s health and domestic violence against women : summary report of initial results on prevalence, health outcomes and women's responses

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2005

Expand view

"Violence against women by an intimate partner is a major contributor to the ill-health of women. This study analyses data from 10 countries and sheds new light on the prevalence of violence against women in countries where few data were previously available. It also uncovers the forms and patterns of this violence across different countries and cultures, documenting the consequences of violence for women’s health. This information has important implications for prevention, care and mitigation... The high rates documented by the Study of sexual abuse experienced by girls and women are of great concern, especially in light of the HIV epidemic. Greater public awareness of this problem is needed and a strong public health response that focuses on preventing such violence from occurring in the first place...This study will help national authorities to design policies and programmes that begin to deal with the problem"

IDRM : regional report of the Americas

CENTRE FOR INTERNATIONAL REHABILITATION
2004

Expand view

This International disability rights monitor takes a snapshot of the situation of disabled people in the Americas for disabled people and the extent to which they are included in society. The report examines education, employment, legislation and other areas. It gives non-governmental organisations, policy makers and individuals an opportunity to research the living conditions of disabled people in this part of the world

Access to antiretroviral drugs in Brazil

GALVAO, Jane
December 2002

Expand view

Since 1996, the Brazilian Ministry of Health has guaranteed free and universal access to antiretroviral treatment for people living with HIV/AIDS. Implementation of this policy has had political, financial, and logistical challenges. This article investigates the history and context of antiretroviral policy in Brazil, the logistics of the drugs distribution, and the government's strategies for acquisition of the drugs. Many antiretrovirals used in Brazil are produced domestically; the remainder, including some of the most expensive drugs, are purchased from abroad. Although the Brazilian policy of antiretroviral distribution has had notable success, it remains threatened by the high cost of acquisition of drugs, which has led to disputes with international pharmaceutical companies over prices and patents. Whether or not the Brazilian model of guaranteeing access to antiretroviral treatment for people living with HIV/AIDS can be applied in other countries or regions, much can be learned from the country's experience

HIV/AIDS and early childhood [whole issue]

BARTLETT, Kathy
ZIMANYI, Louise
Eds
December 2002

Expand view

This is one of the few publications solely dedicated to early childhood and HIV/AIDS. It contains articles examining the particular experience of the very young child and the social, psychosocial and nutritional impact on their lives in AIDS affected communities. There is also an article about infant feeding practices in Africa. It makes some policy recommendations and the several case studies provide some direct examples of programming in this area

Brazil's HIV/AIDS treatment programme

TREATMENT ACTION CAMPAIGN (TAC)
February 2001

Expand view

It is estimated that 540,000 Brazilians have HIV/AIDS, with the highest prevalence among the poor. However, Brazil treatment programmes have been comparatively successful and AIDS mortality rates have decreased significantly. This fact sheet attempts to explain the reasons for the success but also assesses weaknesses and unresolved issues of the Brazilian programme

Pages

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

Subscribe to updates