Resources search

Are national voluntary reviews promoting awareness and inclusion? : Perceptions survey on civil society and stakeholder engagement in voluntary national reviews and the implementation of the 2030 Agenda

COSTA, Naiara
LONG, Graham
LUXTON, Louise
May 2017

Expand view

"For the second year, Together 2030 has carried out a survey to collect evidence on stakeholder awareness of, and participation in, national planning and review around the 2030 Agenda. In 2017, the survey was conducted in partnership with the Newcastle University. The survey received 461 responses from a range of stakeholders, including national, regional and global organisations. This perceptions survey asked 20 questions in total (though not all questions were directed to all respondents). It was issued in three languages: English, Spanish and French, and was shared broadly with civil society and stakeholder mailing lists and via social media from March 3 to March 24 2017."

This report addresses two key questions about people’s participation in the 2030 agenda for sustainable development:

  • How extensive is stakeholder awareness of, and participation in, the process of country Voluntary National Reviews which are a central component of the High Level Political Forum
  • How aware and engaged is civil society and stakeholders across the world in national level planning and review of the SDGs?

This report presents statistical, survey-based evidence that helps to address these two questions. 

European Semester : Developing more inclusive labour markets for all?

EUROPEAN ASSOCIATION OF SERVICE PROVIDERS FOR PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES (EASPD)
November 2016

Expand view

This report examines why the European Semester should look further into the employment rates of persons with disabilities and which measures should be taken at national level to improve the current situation. An overview is given on employment and the UN CRPD and its meaning for the European Union (EU). What the EU is currently doing when it comes to developing more inclusive labour markets through its Employment policy and the European Semester process is examined. The assessment of the legal, political and economic arguments why the European Commission should do more in regard to the employment of persons with disabilities are presented. The economic arguments are also presented through a Study developed specifically for this report by Professor Stephen Beyer. Several ideas as to how the European Commission could focus more on this issue, with feasible and pragmatic recommendations are presented. Specific national messages from EASPD members are included on what changes are needed to tackle the significant unemployment rate of persons with disabilities throughout Europe; including in Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Greece, Ireland, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia and Spain.  

United Nations Global Sustainable Development Report 2016

Uinted Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA)
July 2016

Expand view

This report was prepared to inform the discussions at the high-level political forum (HLPF) on sustainable development in 2016. The theme chosen for the HLPF is "ensuring that no one is left behind". The report builds on GSDR2014 and GSDR2015. The approach is of an assessment of assessments, documenting and describing the landscape of information on specific issues or nexuses of issues. Specifically, the report keeps the ‘science-policy interface’ and ‘SDGs as integrated system’ as main threads. Main topics include: ensuring that no one is left behind and the 2030 Agenda; the infrastructure – inequality – resilience nexus; perspectives of scientists on technology and the SDGs; inclusive institutions for sustainable development; and identification of emerging Issues for sustainable development. An annex addresses persons with disabilities specifically, highlighting their over-representation in the "furthest behind".

The Americans with disabilities act at 25 years : lessons to learn from the convention on the rights of people with disabilities

KANTER, Arlene S
2015

Expand view

“In this Article, the Author argues that the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the subsequent ADA Amendments Act (ADAAA), have not realized the goal of ensuring equality for people with disabilities. The Author suggests that the Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities

(CRPD), adopted in 2006 by the United Nations, offers a new approach to realizing the right to equality for people with disabilities”

Drake Law Review, Vol. 63

State of the world’s emergencies : a briefing for new UK parliamentarians

BOND HUMANITARIAN GROUP
BOND CONFLICT POLICY GROUP
July 2015

Expand view

“The briefing is designed to give incoming members of parliament a rapid overview of some of the world’s most fragile situations and highlight actions which key influencers can take to ensure the UK government most effectively delivers on its moral and political responsibilities. Beginning with summaries of key issues we face as agencies working in humanitarian crisis and conflict settings, the briefing then focuses on short summaries of 10 fragile situations and emergencies”

Note: the information is accurate to the middle of April 2015

The situation of disabled people in the republic of South Africa

LANG, Dr Raymond
June 2007

Expand view

This paper provides a situational analysis of the social, economic and political status of disabled people in South Africa, and analyses the policy framework in which disability services are provided. The paper is based upon secondary sources of published material and interviews conducted with key stakeholders and individuals. It is useful for people interested in the situation of disabled people in South Africa
Working Paper Series No 5

Social movements and chronic poverty across the urban-rural divide : concepts and experiences

MITLIN, Diana
BEBBINGTON, Anthony
September 2006

Expand view

"This paper develops a series of arguments regarding the contribution of social movements to the reduction of chronic poverty in both urban and rural social contexts...The summary is divided into three sections addressing: the relevance of social movements to the chronically poor; social movements and the representation of the chronically poor; and the interaction between the state and movements of the poor, with a special focus on the influence of social movements on policy and politics...[the] discussion suggests that the power of social movements lies less in their ability to influence the specifics of policies and programmes, and rather more in their capacity to change the terms in which societies debate poverty and social change, and to influence the types of development and policy alternatives that are considered legitimate in a given social and political context"

Policy engagement for poverty reduction : how civil society can be more effective

COURT, Julius
June 2006

Expand view

This briefing paper draws on a report by Julius Court and others entitled 'Policy engagement: how can civil society be more effective', also published by ODI. It examines the role of civil society organisations in poverty reduction strategies and looks at ways to enhance their influence on the policy making process. Inadequate knowledge about the policy making process, lack of resources, insufficient capacity and policy makers' mistrust of CSOs are the main obstacles to their full engagement in policy making. Effective approaches should entail: campaigning and implementation of pilot projects aimed at improving adverse political contexts; rigorous mapping and assessment of political contexts; identify critical policy stages; provide relevant and objective evidence; use effective communication methods and strategies; apply network approaches; engage in systematic capacity building

World Development Report 2006 : equity and development

WORLD BANK
September 2005

Expand view

The 2006 World Development Report focuses on equity and development strategy. It builds on and extends frameworks discussed in the 2004 report. Equity is a potentially important factor affecting both the workings of the investment environment and the empowerment of the poor - the two major lines of the World Bank's poverty reduction strategy. The report describes current levels of and recent trends in inequalities along some key dimensions, both within and across countries; discusses whether such inequalities matter and, if so, how it may be possible to reduce them in ways which, rather than harming economic efficiency and growth, may indeed help promote them; and explores the role of domestic policies and international forces, and the potential for international action to reduce inequalities

What do we do with culture? Engaging culture in development

VINCENT, Robin
March 2005

Expand view

This short briefing paper gives a critical overview of recent attempts to engage culture in development work, and in HIV and AIDS work in particular. It also outlines a range of insights from anthropological work that relate to understanding and addressing culture in development. Areas covered include moving beyond a focus on the individual in analysis of change, looking beyond the local setting only, considering the role of the organisational culture of development institutions, valuing indigenous knowledge, and looking at the way mobilising culture and cultural resources is intimately linked to power relations

A global look to the local : replacing economic globalisation with democratic localisation

HINES, Colin
2004

Expand view

This discussion paper seeks to identify the forms of economic organisation that might best support the institutionalisation of participation and people-centred processes in development. Written in a non-academic and accessible style, the paper renews with traditions of political and economic philosophy that propose ethical norms to guide social relations and the organisation of economic life. Using food systems as a unifying example, the author shows how localisation reverses the trend of corporate globalisation by discriminating in favour of the local. This approach to organising economic life has local self-reliance and the potential to increase self-determination at its core. A set of mutually reinforcing policies that can potentially increase control of the economy by communities and nation states are described. Localisation has the potential to foster and help institutionalise democratic participation in its broadest sense. For example it is anticipated that 'economic democracy' will occur via involvement in increasingly diverse national production. More 'electoral democracy' is likely since people have a greater incentive to vote when local and national governments have greater control over their own economies. Forms of direct and participatory democracy can also spread and become institutionalised under a localisation approach that introduces a guaranteed citizen income and re-affirms a commitment to self-determination

Report on the CODEP conference 2001. The economics of war and peace : addressing the dilemmas

BEARDON, Hannah
2001

Expand view

This conference focussed on the impact of the global economy on violent conflict and efforts at achieving peace, and the response of civil society at local, regional and international levels. The conference discussed whether globalisation is a new phenomenon, what the implications of globalisation for the dynamics of war and peace are; who the main actors in initiating, prolonging and resolving interstate conflicts are; the extent to which the 'greed versus grievance' framework helps us to understand the motivations of the actors; what other tools are available to help us understand conflict; and what the implications for constructing appropriate policy and programme responses to conflict are. Pages 35-36 (Richard Graham on donor-NGO relations, and pages 42-43 (final evaluation) are particularly useful

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

Subscribe to updates