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Responding to intimate partner violence and sexual violence against women : WHO clinical and policy guidelines

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2013

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"The guidelines aim to raise awareness of violence against women among health-care providers and policy-makers, so that they better understand the need for an appropriate health-sector response. They provide standards that can form the basis for national guidelines, and for integrating these issues into health-care provider education...The guidelines are based on systematic reviews of the evidence, and cover: identification and clinical care for intimate partner violence; clinical care for sexual assault; training relating to intimate partner violence and sexual assault against women; policy and programmatic approaches to delivering services; mandatory reporting of intimate partner violence"

Responding to intimate partner violence and sexual violence against women : summary

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2013

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"This document summarizes ‘Responding to intimate partner violence and sexual violence against women: WHO clinical and policy guidelines’, the World Health Organization (WHO), 2013 publication, developed by an international group of experts following a thorough review of evidence. It contains evidence-based recommendations for the introduction of policies into health services and programmes to improve responses within the health sector to violence against women. Each recommendation is classified as either "strong" or "conditional", on the basis of the generalizability of benefit across different communities and cultures, the needs and preferences of women to access services, as well as taking into consideration the level of human and other resources that would be required"
WHO/RHR/13.10

Expanding antiretroviral treatment in developing countries creates critical new challenges

MORRISON, J Stephen
June 2002

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Summarizes and describes the challenges and policy implications for scaling up ARV provision in developing countries. It identifies six core challenges: expanding health system capacity; affordability of treatment regimens; integrating and strengthening prevention activities; adverse side effects; drug resistance; and the needs of a growing population of people living with HIV

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