Resources search

Guidance for United States Government in-country staff and implementing partners for a preventative care package for children aged 0-14 years old born to HIV-infected mothers - #1

President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator (PEPFAR)
April 2006

Expand view

This document describes preventive care interventions that the PEPFAR Emergency Plan can support for children born to HIV-infected mothers, including children in whom an HIV diagnosis has been confirmed. It suggests that the Emergency Plan links delivery of interventions with existing community and health facilities that provide basic health care and social services fro children; with other Emergency Plan programmes such as those to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission, those to serve orphans and vulnerable children, and those to provide home-based care; and with global programmes to combat malaria and tuberculosis. This document does not address antiretroviral treatment for children

Pneumonia : the forgotton killer of children

WARDLAW, Tessa
WHITE JOHANSSON, Emily
HODGE, Matthew
2006

Expand view

This report examines the epidemiological evidence on the burden and distribution of pneumonia and assesses current levels of treatment and prevention. The report aims to raise awareness of pneumonia and to serve as a call to action to reduce child deaths from pneumonia

Handbook on paediatric AIDS in Africa

TINDYEBWA, Denis
et al
2004

Expand view

This handbook intends to provide users in resource-poor countries with a tool that can be adapted to their needs. It follows the four principles of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and aims to provide a simple, accessible and practical handbook for health workers involved in preventing infection and caring for children infected and affected by HIV. It includes substantial chapters on caring for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children, infants and orphans; diagnosis and the clinical stages of HIV infection; clinical conditions associated with HIV (diarrhoea, malnutrition, neurological manifestations, skin manifestations and more); pulmonary conditions; anti-retroviral therapy for children; youth issues, long-term and terminal care planning; psychosocial support. The primary targets are medical students and their lecturers, nurses, clinicians, community health workers and other service providers in resource poor settings where there is a significant HIV and AIDS burden

Sociocultural explanations for delays in careseeking for pneumonia

CENTRE FOR HEALTH AND POPULATION RESEARCH
December 2003

Expand view

This article is printed in the Health and Science Bulletin produced by the Centre for Health and Population Research, based in Bangladesh. It outlines research conducted among parents in Matlab, Bangladesh, revealing how their beliefs affect household treatment of childhood pneumonia and influence delays in seeking care from trained providers. Many indigenous beliefs and social factors prevent primary care providers, particularly mothers, of pneumonia cases from obtaining prompt and appropriate help. For example, in fear of being blamed for poor caring practices, mothers are reluctant to share information about the illness with other family members. Intervention strategies designed to reduce child mortality associated with pneumonia need to address the cultural beliefs and challenges. Efforts should focus on involving family members such as the child's father or grandmother in early recognition of pneumonia cases. It also suggests that health workers use local terminology and cultural knowledge to communicate the need for prompt treatment with a trained provider

Pages

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

Subscribe to updates