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The Application of ICF-based Functioning Data on Home Environment Adaptation for Persons with Disabilities

TONGSIRI, S
HAWSUTISIMA, K
2013

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Purpose: This study illustrates how the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) domains and qualifiers could be used to create functioning profiles of persons with disabilities in order to plan environmental changes. The outcome of the interventions can be measured by before-and-after comparisons of these profiles.

 

Method: 33 persons with disabilities (11 each from three provinces), with an average age of 43 years, were interviewed between November 2011 and May 2012. 67% of them were male. The functioning profiles of all the subjects were used as guidelines for home environment adaptations.

 

Results: The data helped to understand the limitations of persons with disabilities and identified the areas that needed enhancement to improve their functioning. Modification lay-outs were provided for all 33 persons with disabilities.

 

Conclusion and Implications: It was demonstrated that the ICF framework could help create functioning profiles to guide modifications in the home environment. Future studies should examine whether ICF can measure actual changes that occur after the modifications.

Challenges Faced by Malaysians with Disabilities in the World of Employment

TA, T L
LENG, K S
2013

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Purpose: This paper aims to explore and understand the challenges that are encountered by Malaysians with disabilities in the world of employment.

 

Method: A survey was undertaken in four Northern Malaysian states (Perlis, Kedah, Penang and Perak) to obtain the primary data. Two sets of questionnaires were formulated. The first questionnaire was addressed towards Malaysianpeople with disabilities, while the second one was for the employers. Descriptive statistics were used to explore, summarise and describe the data collected.

 

Results: This paper argues that integrating people with disabilities into the mainstream workforce should be the way forward, given that they are a pool of untapped human resources. Crucially, this study also highlights some of the key challenges faced by Malaysian people with disabilities, such as discrimination and exploitation at work.

 

Conclusions: This paper concludes that equal employment and training opportunities should be extended to Malaysian people with disabilities, in an effort to integrate them into the mainstream workforce. The existing Disability Act 2008 should be revised to address the challenges and issues highlighted in this paper.

Barriers everywhere : accessibility for people with disabilities in Russia

HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH (HRW)
2013

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"This report is based on 123 interviews with people with disabilities and their families in 6 cities across Russia. It documents the everyday hurdles people with disabilities meet when going to government offices, shops, healthcare centers, and places of employment, and accessing public transportation"
Note: an easy-read version and two short films are available from the link provided

Sustaining human development : addressing NCDs and disability across the lifecourse

THE NCD ALLIANCE
et al
2013

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This report explores three interconnected global trends — a growing burden of non-communicable diseases (NCDs), the rising prevalence of disability, and changing global population demographics (including rapidly ageing populations). The report highlights that there issues were collectively neglected as policy priorities during the era of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). It stresses that the unique opportunity to ensure a future framework that fully integrates NCDs, that goals and targets drive progress for all people including persons with disabilities, and that a lifecourse and rights-based approach underpins all goals and targets to ensure no one is left behind

Towards resilience : a guide to disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation

TURNBALL, Marilise
STERRETT Charlotte L
HILLEBOE, Amy
2013

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The guide provides information for the application of an integrated, rights-based approach to disaster risk reduction and climate change adaptation. It features introductory information, principles of effective practice, guidelines for action in a range of sectors and settings, case studies and links to useful tools and resources. It is a resource for staff of development and humanitarian organisations working with people whose lives and rights are threatened by disasters and climate change

Building resilience : integrating climate and disaster risk into development

THE WORLD BANK
2013

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This report presents the World Bank’s experience in climate and disaster resilient development, and contends that such development is essential to eliminating extreme poverty and achieving shared prosperity by 2030.  Case studies are used throughout this report to illustrate promising approaches, lessons learned and remaining challenges.  Vulnerable populations are discussed within the report

Sexual Health of Women with Spinal Cord Injury in Bangladesh

LUBBERS, N P M
NURI, R P
VAN BRAKEL, W H
CORNIELJE, H
2012

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Purpose: To identify factors influencing the sexual health of women with spinal cord injury (SCI) in Bangladesh.

 

Methods: This study used both qualitative and quantitative methods. The quantitative part used a case-control design. Cases were women with SCI and controls were age-matched women without SCI. Questionnaires were used to collect data concerning the sexual health status of women. Multivariate logistic regression was done to determine which factors had an independent effect on sexual health. In-depth interviews were held with a sub-group of women from both groups, and interview guides were used. The in-depth interview data was subjected to content analysis.

 

Results: In total, 92 questionnaires were given out and 30 in-depth interviews were conducted. A relationship was found between physical factors and sexual health, as pain, vaginal dryness and physical discomfort were mentioned more frequently among women with SCI. Environmental and emotional factors such as stigma, satisfaction of the husband and support from the husband and friends had an influence on the sexual health of the women with SCI, as well as the other group of women.

 

Conclusions: From interviews it became clear that most of the women with SCI were dissatisfied with their sexual health as compared to the women without SCI. However, environmental and emotional factors such as attitudes, support and stigma, rather than physical factors, were the most important influences on sexual health in both groups of women.

Assessment of election access barriers in Guatemala

SERPE, Lauren
November 2012

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This research report presents the lessons learned from various activities to improve the inclusion of persons with disabilities in the electoral process and future programming needs in Guatemala. Three research activities captured the different perspectives of those working on or affected by inclusion issues: a survey of 250 electoral authorities; six focus groups consisting of persons with disabilities and those who work with persons with disabilities; and six in-depth interviews with leaders of disabled persons organizations (DPOs) with whom IFES had worked during the previous electoral cycle

Political participation for everyone : disabled people’s rights and the political process

HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION
October 2012

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This report deals with the issue of the right to political participation which includes voting procedures, voting by secret ballot, access to political information and participation in political parties in New Zealand. The issues of information accessibility and built environment accessibility are addressed in separate reports. This report covers the following: the Commission’s experience and research; the relevant international standards and domestic legislation; international good practice; and ideas to improve political participation in New Zealand
Book 3 of 3

Towards inclusive WASH : sharing evidence and experience from the field

WATERAID AUSTRALIA
July 2012

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"This publication is a record of efforts to achieve equity and inclusion in WASH programming around the world. It includes one keynote paper and 16 case studies from 13 countries. Within its pages there is a clear message that ‘business as usual’ is not sufficient to meet the water and sanitation rights of traditionally excluded or marginalised groups. The case studies are therefore a story of adaptation, of technology, of process and of policy, and innovation to try something new. Many of the case studies are accompanied by supporting materials, including research reports, survey tools and videos. The authors hope these materials will be of use to other practitioners who hope to build on the stories presented in this publication"
Note: full details of each case study are provided on the website

Americans with disabilities : 2010

BRAULT, Matthew W
July 2012

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This report presents estimates of disability status and type in the United States (US) representative of the civilian non-institutionalized population. The data used in this report were collected from May through August 2010 and categorizes types of disabilities into communicative, physical, and mental domains according to a set of criteria as described in the report
P70-131

Findings on accessibility of the zero project

HEINDORF, Ingrid
Eds
June 2012

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This report presents the findings from The Zero Project 2012 which highlights the implementation of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The report’s thematic focus on barriers provides examples of social indicators, good practice and good policy relating to accessibility to the physical environment, to transportation, to information and communications, as well as to other facilities and services provided to the public “"A prelude to the European Accessibility Act: Findings of the international Zero Project Report 2012"
Brussels, Belgium
21 June 2012

Defining the barriers to political participation for individuals with disabilities

HALL, Thad E
ALVAREZ, R. Michael
May 2012

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This report examines the barriers to political participation that can exist for individuals with disabilities. Such studies can be difficult because there are few studies that examine both disability status and political variables such as party identification and ideology. No studies directly ask about whether a person’s disability status directly interferes with the various aspects of political participation, such as getting news about candidates or navigating the polling place in order to vote. The analyses that follow utilize data from several surveys, including the Current Population Survey, the 2008 Study of the Performance of American Elections, and the 2008 Cooperative Congressional Election Study
Working Paper #001

Designed to deter: Barriers to facilities at secondary schools in Ghana

DANSO, Anthony K
OWUSU-ANSAH, Frances E
ALORWU, Divine
2012

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Background: There are varied and complex problems associated with the admission of students with disabilities into secondary (senior high) schools all over the world. This situation is further complicated by difficulties encountered in the built environment of these institutions and, in this, Ghana is no exception.

 

Objectives: This exploratory study investigated the level of accessibility of the built environment in secondary schools in eight out of the ten regions of Ghana, in order to determine whether they conform to guidelines provided in international building standards and also assess the extent to which they have been designed and constructed to meet the provisions of the Persons with Disability Act 2006, which allows for equal access to public buildings in Ghana.

 

Method: In total, 705 building elements in 264 facilities were surveyed using international standards, building codes, regulations and guidelines. These facilities included car parks, classrooms, dormitories, assembly halls, telephone booths and administration blocks.

 

Results: Our findings revealed that most of the building elements were barring and not disability-friendly. Just to name a few: there were obstructions on access routes to and around buildings, absence of designated car parks, unfriendly vertical and horizontal means of circulation in buildings and lack of accessible sanitary accommodations. In addition, the general lighting and signage were poor. As a result, very few students with disabilities are admitted and retained in these schools.

 

Conclusion: Mainstreaming of people with disabilities into the Ghanaian educational system remains impossible unless urgent action is taken to alter the facilities at secondary schools. Based on this research outcome, recommendations have been made to the Ghanaian government and the Ghana Education Service, as well as non-governmental organisations and relevant professional bodies for the amelioration of the present situation in our secondary schools.

 

The Role of Community Health Workers in the Mongolian CBR Programme

COMO, E
BATDULAM, T
2012

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Purpose: This article aims to present the role of community health workers in the implementation of a comprehensive CBR Programme in rural Mongolia, and to explore the main challenges that arise in this specific geographical and socio-economic context.

 

Methods: Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews with CBR workers from three selected provinces; short meetings and interviews with respective provincial level CBR coordinators complemented the information acquired. Additionally, a workshop with national level CBR stakeholders was carried out in order to review and discuss the findings.

 

Results: The study highlighted a number of practical barriers (including long distances and lack of transportation, low population density, and harsh climate conditions) which constrain the work of community health workers in the areas studied. In relation to disability, the study shed light on the difficulties found by community workers in shifting from a medical approach to disability to a new approach that emphasizes prevention and rehabilitation. Exploring interviewees’ experience in the five areas of CBR (health, education, livelihood, social, empowerment) the authors found that working in the areas other than health is perceived as difficult due to insufficient training as well as objective contextual barriers.

 

Conclusions: Despite many challenges, CBR represents a significant improvement for disability action in rural Mongolia. In this context, the local community health workers are well suited and willing to act as CBR workers; nonetheless, more training and some tailoring work to adapt the Programme to the context is needed if all potential results are to be achieved.

 

Limitations: This study did not include direct observation of CBR activities or consultation of beneficiaries and other stakeholders. Their involvement and consultation would certainly improve the understanding of all the issues raised.

Making Kenya ODF

MUSYOKI, Samuel
March 2012

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This community-led total sanitation (CLTS) blog outlines progress on CLTS in Kenya, noting the difference in approach in Ghana and Ethiopia, and highlights the new approaches taken by some disabled people, working towards the goal of making Kenya open defecation free (ODF)

Roads from Rio+20: pathways to achieve global sustainability goals by 2050

PBL NETHERLANDS ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT AGENCY
et al
2012

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"This report was written in the run-up to Rio+20, the UN conference that will revisit the outcomes of its 1992 precursor. Rio+20 aims to set the agenda for sustainable development policies in the coming decade, with its focus on a next generation of sustainable development goals, a green economy and the reform of the institutional framework for sustainable development. This report analyses possible pathways to achieve a set of internationally agreed sustainable development goals for food, land and biodiversity, as well as for energy and climate. It explores how environmental and development objectives could be reconciled, in actual practice"

On the right track : good practices in realising the rights to water and sanitation

DE ALBUQUERQUE, Catarina
ROAF, Virginia
2012

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This book presents the discussion and analysis of existing practices in how rights to water and sanitation should be implemented to inspire policy- and decision makers, practitioners, activists and civil society in general to engage with the rights to water and sanitation to assist in the process of ensuring that everyone has access to safe drinking water and sanitation services for all daily personal and domestic purposes.

 

The practices were taken from submissions, consultations and meetings with a range of actors and have been organised into four main types: State actions and the legal and institutional frameworks that promote the realisation of the rights to water and sanitation; financing for the sector; non-State stakeholder practices to promote and protect the rights to water and sanitation; and practices that demonstrate how States and other actors can be held accountable through the monitoring of  water and sanitation services

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