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HIV, disability and rehabilitation : considerations for policy and practise

HEALTH ECONOMICS AND HIV/AIDS RESEARCH DIVISION (HEARD)
January 2010

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This issue brief considers the links between HIV and disability - that people with disabilities are among the key populations at high risk to exposure to HIV, and that people living with HIV may develop impairments and disabilities as a result of the disease. It anticipates an increased demand for rehabilitation services in Eastern and Southern Africa, given the improved access to HIV treatments and high prevalence of people living with HIV in the region, and warns that many in areas services are already stretched and resource-poor, so may struggle to cope with greater demand. The brief focuses on: issues regarding the definition of disability; implications for rehabilitation services; and considerations for disability grants

Disability and HIV policy brief

JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
OFFICE OF THE HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS (OHCHR)
April 2009

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This policy brief discusses the actions needed to increase the participation of persons with disabilities in the response to HIV and to ensure that they have access to HIV services which are both tailored to their diverse needs and equal to the services available to others in the community. Recommendations of actions for governments, civil society and aid agencies are provided, having been defined in consultation with a broad range of stakeholders including people living with HIV and persons with disabilities. An example from South Africa is highlighted. This document is beneficial for anyone working in disability and development with HIV and AIDS

Inspiring futures : learning from memory work in Africa

DUNN, Alison
HAMMOND WARD, Sarah
2009

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This learning paper looks at the experiences of applying memory work as part of broader strategies to mitigate the impact of HIV and AIDS in five African countries. It explores how six NGOs in sub-Saharan Africa established memory work as a key component of their community-based HIV programmes and draws on the experience of people living with HIV and AIDS, children and young people who participated in the initiative, partner organisations' own learning and analysis and the end of project evaluation report

Teachers living with HIV

UNAIDS Inter-Agency Task Team (IATT) for Education
2008

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This briefing note considers teachers living with HIV and their role in HIV education and in countering stigma and discrimination, as well as the need for governments to introduce measures to support them and thus mitigate the impact of HIV on the education system

Memory work : which way now?

HEALTHLINK WORLDWIDE
2008

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This learning paper considers how memory work makes a difference in people’s lives, how issues around sustaining and scaling up the approach are important to its continuation, and why, even with increased access to antiretroviral treatment, memory work still remains vital

Early infant diagnosis of HIV through dried blood spot testing

PATHFINDER INTERNATIONAL / KENYA
October 2007

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Until recently the test used to diagnose HIV in babies under one-year has required sophisticated and expensive equipment. A new test has now been developed - dried blood spot testing which can be used to diagnose HIV as early as six weeks after a baby is born and has the advantage of being easy to prepare in a resource-limited setting and shipped to testing facilities without refrigeration. If a baby is given prophylactic antibiotics, such as cotrimoxazole, soon after birth and Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) as soon as is medically indicated, it has a good chance of surviving childhood and living a long, healthy life

Towards a stronger response to HIV and AIDS: challenging stigma

International Center for Research on Women (ICRW)
2007

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This is an internal paper for the Department for International Development (DFID) that looks at information and evidence for the global prevalence of HIV stigma and how it is damaging people living with HIV and AIDS and their families, especially women. It also looks at evidence that this compromises effective responses to AIDS by lowering the uptake of preventative services and testing, delays disclosure, decreases care seeking and undermines treatment. The paper examines successful strategies that have been used to tackle stigma and suggests that DFID is well placed to help scale-up efforts and play a leading role in the international arena

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