Resources search

The Rights of Persons with Disabilities Amid COVID-19

UNITED NATIONS HUMAN RIGHTS
Ministry of Social Development
Independent Commission for Human Rights
June 2020

Expand view

This document make specific recommendations on support and protection to be provided to persons with disabilities during the COVID-19 response, and to ensure that appropriate measures are in place to maintain their active participation as well as to avoid discrimination at all levels against them

Disability Inclusive Development - Bangladesh Situational Analysis

THOMPSON, Stephen
June 2020

Expand view

This situational analysis (SITAN) addresses the question: “what is the current situation for persons with disabilities in Bangladesh?”. It has been prepared for the Disability Inclusive Development programme (which works on access to education, jobs, healthcare, and reduced stigma and discrimination for persons with disabilities in Bangladesh, Jordan, Kenya, Nepal, Nigeria, and Tanzania), to better understand the current context, including COVID-19, and available evidence in Bangladesh. It will be helpful for anyone interested in disability inclusion in Bangladesh, especially in relation to stigma, employment, education, health, and humanitarian issues.

Policy brief: A disability-inclusive response to COVID-19

UNITED NATIONS SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT GROUP
May 2020

Expand view

This policy brief highlights the impact of COVID19 on persons with disabilities and in doing so, outlines key actions and recommendations to make the response and recovery inclusive of persons with disabilities. While the brief contains specific recommendations focusing on key sectors, it identifies four overarching areas of action that are applicable for all

Good practices on the implementation of the UNCRPD in Timor Leste (2015-2017)

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
DOS SANTOS, Domingos T.M.
et al
August 2019

Expand view

The 2015-2017 Advocating for Change Project (AfC), a project funded by the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ), aimed at promoting and advocating for rights of people with disabilities through the push for the ratification of the UNCRPD at the national level, improving quality decentralization process at the local level and promoting quality livelihood action for people with disabilities through improved and inclusive vocational training center (CNEFP) in Tibar.

One particular activity in this project is the collection and dissemination of best practices with the "Making it Work" methodology. This methodology aims to document and promote already existing best practices that adhere to the principles of UNCRPD. Making it Work utilizes a multi stakeholder approach and encourages members of DPOs and other organizations to identify best practices and effective action in and surrounding their localities. These best practices are then collected with the ultimate goal to serve as examples of embodiment of the UNCRPD for replication by organizations or institutions elsewhere.

Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development (DCID), 2019, Vol. 30 No, 2

2019

Expand view

Research articles are:

  • Stereotypes about Adults with Learning Disabilities: Are Professionals a Cut Above the Rest?
     
  • Perceptions of Primary Caregivers about Causes and Risk Factors of Cerebral Palsy in Ashanti Region, Ghana
     
  • Changes in Social Participation of Persons Affected by Leprosy, Before and After Multidrug Therapy, in an Endemic State in Eastern India
     
  • Users’ Satisfaction with Assistive Devices in Afghanistan
     
  • Perceived Benefits and Barriers to Exercise among Physically Active and Non-Active Elderly People

 

Brief reports are:

  • The GRID Network: A Community of Practice for Disability Inclusive Development
     
  • A Preliminary Report of the Audiological Profile of Hearing Impaired Pupils in Inclusive Schools in Lagos State, Nigeria

 

An experiential report is given:

  • MAANASI - A Sustained, Innovative, Integrated Mental Healthcare Model in South India

 

Making it count: The power of youth advocates in the disability movement

WILM, Suzanne
LEONARD CHESHIRE
HANKS, Phil
May 2019

Expand view

The 2030 and Counting pilot project sought to give youth with disabilities a seat at the table on the SDGs – providing them with the tools and confidence they need to become their own agents of change. This report provides an overview of the project, together with learnings and recommendations for the future.

In its pilot year, 2030 and Counting brought together young women and men with disabilities and DPOs from Kenya, the Philippines and Zambia to report on and advocate for their rights through the framework of the SDGs

The project had three consecutive phases: Training, Story gathering (data collection) and Influencing. 

In total, 332 reports were collected between June and September 2018. The highest number of reports were submitted under the theme of Education (44%), followed by Work (33%), and Health (14%). The category of Other, which almost entirely focused on discrimination in daily life, accounted for 8%. 80% of reporters had smartphones, offering the potential to increase the use of this feature in future.
 

Disability in Gaza: policy, barriers to inclusion and a mapping of interventions (Disability Inclusion Helpdesk Report No.12)

LEE, Harri
ABU ALGHAIB, Ola
LAURICIANO, Rabeca
May 2019

Expand view

This report presents key findings from a practical ‘know-how’ query, which included a rapid review of key literature as well as a small set of key informant interviews (KIIs) to help fill gaps and supplement online evidence. This query is based on a rapid review of the available literature to provide a brief overview of the barriers people with disabilities face in Gaza in terms of access to basic services, jobs and social inclusion/participation (Section 2), and the policy framework in Gaza in relation to the rights of people with disabilities(Section 3). The main body of this query comprises a mapping of existing interventions for people with disabilities in Gaza and an analysis of the trends and gaps in programming (Section 4)

Towards independent living: Collecting examples from Europe

ANGELOVA-MLADENOVA, Lilia
March 2019

Expand view

This Collection is a joint initiative of the European Network on Independent Living (ENIL) and the European Disability Forum (EDF). It features examples from different EU Member States, which to a different extent facilitate the right to live independently in the community.

The examples are divided into four areas, presented in different chapters:

  • Legislation and funding: State Funded Peer-Counselling – Estonia; Direct Payments – Ireland.
  • Community-based support: Peer-Counselling for women with disabilities – Austria; Supported living for adults with intellectual disabilities – Croatia; Supported Decision-Making – The Czech Republic; Mobile Mental Health Units – Greece; Personal Assistance for People with Complex Disabilities – Sweden .
  • Involvement of disabled people: Co-Production in Social Care – United Kingdom; Participation of Organisations of People with Disabilities – Italy
  • Self-advocacy: Self-Advocacy of Disabled People – Romania

 

WHO consolidated guideline on self-care interventions for health: sexual and reproductive health and rights

WORLD HEALTH ORGANISATION (WHO)
2019

Expand view

SELF-CARE is the ability of individuals, families and communities to promote health, prevent disease, maintain health, and to cope with illness and disability with or without the support of a health-care provider. 

The purpose of this guidance is to develop a peoplecentred, evidence-based normative guideline that will support individuals, communities and countries with quality health services and self-care interventions, based on PHC (Primary Health Care) strategies, comprehensive essential service packages and people-centredness. The specific objectives of this guideline are to provide:

• evidence-based recommendations on key public health self-care interventions, including for advancing sexual and reproductive health and rights (SRHR), with a focus on vulnerable populations and settings with limited capacity and resources in the health system

• good practice statements on key programmatic, operational and service-delivery issues that need to be addressed to promote and increase safe and equitable access, uptake and use of self-care interventions, including for advancing SRHR.

Disability and unpaid care work

CBM AUSTRALIA
2019

Expand view

This report looks at the impact of unpaid care work on disability inclusive programming and shares some practical ideas for how to address this based on experiences of CBM partners and other agencies. 

 

Programme experience discussed include:

  • Building agency and relationships: a community mobilisation approach in Jharkhand, India
  • Engaging men as care advocates in the Phillipines
  • Recognising and supporting care givers in Ghana
  • Good practice

 

Alternative report on the implementation of the 2030 Agenda in line with the CRPD in Pakistan

PAKISTAN ASSOCIATION OF THE BLIND
IQBAL, Mohammad
SAJID, Imran
2019

Expand view

Pakistan is committed to fulfilling the vision of 2030 Agenda, and is the first country in the world to localize the SDGs of 2030 Agenda after a unanimous parliamentary resolution was passed on 19 February, 2016. The federal and provincial governments have established SDG units in their respective planning and development departments. This report analyses 6 SDGs and their respective provisions in UNCRPD in Pakistan. 

This report selected SDG 01, 03, 04, 08, 11, and 16 and their progress in Pakistan. A participatory methodology was adopted whereby the data was collected through interviews, questionnaires and it focused on group discussions from the Disabled People’s Organizations (DPOs) based in Islamabad, Peshawar, Lahore, Karachi, Quetta, Gilgit-Baltistan, and Azad Jammu and Kashmir. The data was collected in two phases: phase-I involved interviews while phase-II involved focused group discussions.

Quality of life of persons with disabilities in SNNPR, Ethiopia

2019

Expand view

The Ethiopian Centre for Disability and Development (ECDD), supported by the Light for the World Inclusion Lab in the Netherlands, did a survey in the Southern Nations, Nationalities and Peoples’ Region (SNNPR) of Ethiopia to measure access to healthcare, rehabilitation, education, livelihood and community participation.  Almost 1.000 people with different types of disabilities were interviewed (using the Washington Group short set of questions for disability). 

Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development (DCID), 2019, Vol. 3 No. 1

2019

Expand view

Research articles are:

 

  • Community-Based Rehabilitation Programming for Sex(uality), Sexual Abuse Prevention, and Sexual and Reproductive Health: A Scoping Review
  • Access to Social Organisations, Utilisation of Civil Facilities and Participation in Empowerment Groups by People with Disabilities in Amravati district, Maharashtra
  • The Arabic Version of Trinity Amputation and Prosthetic Experience Scale - Revised (TAPES-R) for Lower Limb Amputees: Reliability and Validity
  • Impact of Parenting a Child with Cerebral Palsy on the Quality of Life of Parents: A Systematic Review of Literature

 

Reviews:

  • Uzbekistan: Case for Inclusion
  • Physical Therapy for Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy: A Narrative Review

 

Brief report:

  • Exploring the Experiences of Students with Visual Impairments at the University of Botswana

Changes in social participation of persons affected by leprosy, before and after multidrug therapy, in an endemic state in Eastern India

RAMASAMAY, Senthilkumar
2019

Expand view

Purpose: In general, multidrug therapy (MDT) completion rate and the change in disability levels before and after medical treatment are reported as outcomes in leprosy programmes. Changes in activity and social participation levels are rarely reported, possibly because the parameters are more difficult to measure. The study aimed to assess and evaluate the changes in social participation among leprosy-affected persons after completion of MDT.

 

Method: An observational study was conducted among 108 newly-diagnosed leprosy- affected clients, who were registered at the Leprosy Referral Hospital in Champa, Chhattisgarh. Their disability levels pre- and post- MDT were assessed using the WHO Disability Grading, and their social participation level was assessed using the Participation Scale.

 

Results: Of the 108 clients registered during the study period, 90 completed the full course of MDT and were included in the analysis. The majority of these 90 clients or 83% were multibacillary and 23% had Grade 2 disability at the time of diagnosis. At the end of MDT with steroids therapy for reaction and neuritis, the proportion of clients with no participation restriction increased from 76% to 93%. Clients with visible impairments had more restriction as compared to those with no deformity or no visible deformity, before and after MDT. Among those with visible impairments, 78% had mild to severe restriction before MDT and it declined to 26% on completion of treatment.

 

Conclusion: Presence of Grade 2 disability at the time of diagnosis was significantly associated with participation restriction. MDT and steroid therapy for management of reaction and/or neuritis improves the participation level of leprosy-affected clients, suggesting that early detection and appropriate management would reduce their risk of participation restriction.

Minimum standards for protection, gender and inclusion in emergencies

INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT SOCIETIES (IFRC)
November 2018

Expand view

The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) Minimum standards for protection, gender and inclusion in emergencies (2018) is in its second edition. The first pilot version of the IFRC Minimum standard commitments to gender and diversity in emergency programming was published in 2015. The pilot version has been tested globally by Red Cross and Red Crescent staff, volunteers and management in low-, medium- and high-scale disasters and humanitarian crises. This edition is the result of three years of testing, revision and feedback from protection, gender and inclusion (PGI) and sectoral specialists. New chapters, such as cash-based interventions, have been added as well as a stronger focus on sexual and gender-based violence and disability inclusion to align with the commitments of the IFRC and its member National Societies. This edition is accompanied by the IFRC Protection, gender and inclusion in emergencies toolkit (2018–2019).

This guidance presents Red Cross and Red Crescent staff, members and volunteers with a set of minimum standards for protection, gender and inclusion (PGI) in emergencies. It aims to ensure that the emergency programming of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) and National Societies provides dignity, access, participation and safety for all people affected by disasters and crises.

It provides practical guidance on how to mainstream these four principles in all sectors, based on a consideration of gender, age, disability and other diversity factors. This includes limiting people’s exposure to the risks of violence and abuse and ensuring that emergency programmes “do no harm”.

The standards address protection, gender and inclusion concerns by providing practical ways to engage with all members of the community, respond to their differing needs and draw on their capacities in the most non-discriminatory and effective way. This helps to ensure that local perspectives guide assistance delivery. The standards also support incorporation of the seven Fundamental Principles of the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement.

Saving lives and leaving no one behind - The Gaibandha Model for disability-inclusive disaster risk reduction

ROTHE, Manuel
BROWN, David
NEUSCHAFER, Oliver
October 2018

Expand view

"The Gaibandha Model" good practices guide outlines a framework for successful disability-inclusive disaster risk reduction programming. It is based on the experience of CBM and its partners in implementing community-based disaster risk reduction programs in some of the most flood-affected communities in Bangladesh. The model puts people with disabilities at the center of disaster risk reduction. They are the agents for change, working with the community to improve local systems of disaster prevention, preparedness and response to become more accessible and inclusive.

Adolescents with disabilities: Enhancing resilience and delivering inclusive development

JONES, Nicola
PRESLER-MARSHALL, Elizabeth
STAVROPOLULOU, Maria
July 2018

Expand view

This report takes stock of evidence from LMICs, drawing on findings from a thematic evidence review combined with emerging findings from the Gender and Adolescence: Global Evidence (GAGE) survey and qualitative research baseline studies in Bangladesh, Ethiopia, Jordan and Palestine. These interviews involved more than 6,000 adolescents and their caregivers – including approximately 600 girls and boys with physical, visual, hearing or intellectual impairments, alongside service providers and policy actors. The report draws attention to the multiple and intersecting capabilities that need to be supported in order for adolescents with disabilities in LMICs to reach their full potential. It goes beyond a focus on their access to education and health services, and also considers their rights to psychosocial wellbeing, protection from violence, mobility and opportunities to participate within their communities, as well the skills, assets and support they need to become economically independent once they transition into adulthood. 

Disability inclusion and accountability framework

McCLAIN-NHLAPO, Charlotte
et al
June 2018

Expand view

The main objective of the Disability Inclusion and Accountability Framework is to support the mainstreaming of disability in World Bank activities. It lays out a road map for (a) including disability in the Bank's policies, operations and analytical work, and (b) building internal capacity for supporting clients in implementing disability-inclusive development programs. The primary target audience of the Framework is Bank staff but it is also relevant to the Bank's client countries, development partners and persons with disabilities. The framework provides four main principles for guiding the World Bank’s engagement with persons with disabilities: nondiscrimination and equality, accessibility, inclusion and participation, and partnership and collaboration. 

 

The appendices to this framework highlight key areas in which the Bank can have a significant impact on the inclusion, empowerment, and full participation of persons with disabilities. These areas include transport, urban development, disaster risk management, education, social protection, jobs and employment, information and communication technology, water sector operations, and health care. 


Report No. 126977
 

Disability in North Africa

ROHWERDER, Brigitte
April 2018

Expand view

This desk-based research reports explores the experiences of people with disabilities of inclusion and marginalisation in North Africa, and whether this has had an impact on regional/national economies and wider prosperity. 

Pages

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

Subscribe to updates