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Learning From Experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies for hygiene at home for people with high support needs.

World Vision/CBM Australia
May 2018

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This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HYGIENE AT HOME FOR PEOPLE WITH HIGH SUPPORT NEEDS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes strategies that used to assist households and individuals in hygiene tasks at home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka.

NOTE: The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

Learning from experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies to modify existing household toilets and water access

WORLD VISION
CBM Australia
2018

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This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HOME MODIFICATIONS FOR WASH ACCESS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes the strategies which were used to assist people with disabilities to access toilet and water facilities at their own home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka. Houses and toilet structures in the region were made of brick and concrete. No new toilets were built and modifications involved only minor work to existing household structures, water points and toilets.

NOTE:
The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

Pain relieving drugs in 12 African PEPFAR countries : mapping current providers, identifying current challenges, and enabling expansion of pain control provision in the management of HIV/AIDS

HARDING, Richard
et al
January 2007

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This study aims to identify current opioid prescribing services and regulatory bodies within 12 African PEPFAR (Presidents Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief ) countries, and to examine the barriers to, and appraise the potential for, expansion in the number of opioid providers, for people with HIV and AIDS according to the World Health Organization pain ladder. It concludes that while there are common issues raised by services and International Narcotics Control Board competent authorities, it is clear that these key stakeholders have concerns regarding the potential roll-out of opioids

Access to pain relief - an essential human right

2007

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This report highlights the lack of pain control currently available around the world. It recommends urgent government action to ensure that all sections of society have equal and adequate access to pain control. It is estimated that 100 million people could benefit from basic palliative care every year. Data in this report show that even in established palliative care units, patients lack access to pain control that they need

Guidance for United States Government in-country staff and implementing partners for a preventive care package for adults - #1

President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator (PEPFAR)
April 2006

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This report suggests that focus-countries under PEPFAR's Emergency Plan should adopt a standard "preventative care package" as part of their palliative care programmes. It acknowledges that components of the care package are likely to vary within regions and even within countries. The report provides the scientific basis for the interventions that could be included in a preventive care package. Although most of the interventions included are pertinent to both adults and children, HIV-infected/exposed children require additional consideration and a separate document focusing on a preventive care package for such children has been developed

Guidance for United States Government in-country staff and implementing partners for a preventative care package for children aged 0-14 years old born to HIV-infected mothers - #1

President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief Office of the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator (PEPFAR)
April 2006

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This document describes preventive care interventions that the PEPFAR Emergency Plan can support for children born to HIV-infected mothers, including children in whom an HIV diagnosis has been confirmed. It suggests that the Emergency Plan links delivery of interventions with existing community and health facilities that provide basic health care and social services fro children; with other Emergency Plan programmes such as those to prevent mother-to-child HIV transmission, those to serve orphans and vulnerable children, and those to provide home-based care; and with global programmes to combat malaria and tuberculosis. This document does not address antiretroviral treatment for children

Comprehensive cervical cancer control : a guide to essential practice

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION
2006

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"This publication - produced by WHO and its partners - is designed to provide comprehensive practical advice to health care providers at all levels of the health care system on how to prevent, detect early, treat and palliate cervical cancer. In particular, the Guide seeks to ensure that health care providers at the primary and secondary levels will be empowered to use the best available knowledge in dealing with cervical cancer for the benefit of the whole community."

Palliative care in Sub-Saharan Africa : an appraisal

HARDING, Richard
HIGGINSON, Irene
2004

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This report was written from the belief that palliative care is, and will be for the forseeable future, an essential component in the continuum of managing HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. There is now a wealth of experience in sub-Saharan Africa about the ways in which palliative care can be delivered both affordably and effectively. However, there remains a lack of properly documented evidence and research to demonstrate the importance of this work and promote its development. This report provides a review of existing evaluations of palliative care projects in sub-Saharan Africa with an emphasis on isolating the factors that lead to sustainability, local ownership and scaling up; the role of palliative care in the management of HIV/AIDS and how to integrate palliative care and Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART); primary health based care projects in two countries, Kenya and Malawi, that could provide lessons for the implementation of palliative care; lessons from other parallel programmes which mirror palliative care delivery, for example, tuberculosis programmes, and primary care programmes with good links to local clinics and hospitals, and community mobilization and empowerment projects linked to health facilities. In this way it contributes to the effort of providing an evidence base to demonstrate the importance of palliative care and provides a source of reference for policy makers, practitioners, donors and researchers

Handbook on paediatric AIDS in Africa

TINDYEBWA, Denis
et al
2004

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This handbook intends to provide users in resource-poor countries with a tool that can be adapted to their needs. It follows the four principles of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and aims to provide a simple, accessible and practical handbook for health workers involved in preventing infection and caring for children infected and affected by HIV. It includes substantial chapters on caring for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children, infants and orphans; diagnosis and the clinical stages of HIV infection; clinical conditions associated with HIV (diarrhoea, malnutrition, neurological manifestations, skin manifestations and more); pulmonary conditions; anti-retroviral therapy for children; youth issues, long-term and terminal care planning; psychosocial support. The primary targets are medical students and their lecturers, nurses, clinicians, community health workers and other service providers in resource poor settings where there is a significant HIV and AIDS burden

Palliative care in Sub-Saharan Africa : an appraisal

HARDING, Richard
HIGGINSON, Irene J.
2004

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This review identifies and appraises activities, opportunities and evidence of the status of palliative care in Africa. It reviews the context of palliative care in Sub-Saharan Africa, the role of palliative care in HIV management, including antiretroviral therapy, current models of care and issues of quality assurance and offers recommendations for practitioners, funders, policy makers and researchers

AIDS : palliative care

JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
October 2000

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This update explains what palliative is and describes the types of palliative care that are available. It sets out what governments will need to do to ensure effective palliative care is provided for people living with HIV/AIDS

A better life and death

KRAMER, I
1998

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People with AIDS should be able to make decisions about their treatment in the final stages of illness and about how and where they wish to die. The quality of life of a dying person is not determined solely by their medical care; issues such as social and emotional support, spirituality, and resolving unfinished business are equally as important. It is helpful to make practical arrangements as early as possible for debts, children's school fees, and family support. Both palliative and terminal care are needed as the end of life approaches. Palliative care focuses on a range of psychosocial needs. Terminal care seeks to relieve symptoms such as choking and shortness of breath and to enable people to die in comfort and with dignity, in keeping with their personal wishes and religious requirements. This article includes a special section of guidelines developed in Tanzania for writing and making valid a will to ensure that partners and children are provided for

Transferring palliative care from institutions to communities

SOUTHERN AFRICAN AIDS TRAINING PROGRAMME (SAT)

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This brief publication describes the issues in home- or community-based care for chronically or terminally ill people, including those living with HIV/AIDS. It describes a project at the Island Hospice and Bereavement Service in Zimbabwe, which integrated 'traditional' home-based care (HBC) and the specialised palliative care and bereavement support offered at the hospice. It concludes that HBC projects that are linked to and supported by institutions such as hospices are able to integrate specialised skills in palliative care and bereavement support into their on-going work

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