Resources search

Unmet needs and use of assistive products in two districts of Bangladesh: Findings from a household survey

PRYOR, Wesley
NGUYEN, Liem
ISLAM, Qumrun Naher
JALAL, Faruk, Ahmed
MANJULA, Marella
December 2018

Expand view

Access to assistive products (AP) is an under-researched public health issue. Using an adaptation of a draft World Health Organization tool—the ‘Assistive Technology Assessment—Needs (ATA-N)’ for measuring unmet needs and use of AP, we aimed to understand characteristics of AP users, self-reported needs and unmet needs for AP, and current access patterns in Bangladesh. The ATA-N was incorporated in a Rapid Assessment of Disability (RAD), a population-based survey to estimate prevalence and correlates of disability. In each of two unions of Kurigram and Narsingdi districts, 60 clusters of 50 people each aged two years and older were selected using a two-staged cluster random sampling process, of whom, 4250 (59% Female; 41% Male) were adults, including 333 using AP. We estimate 7.1% of the studied population used any AP. AP use is positively associated with age and self-reported functional difficulty. The proportion of people using AP is higher for mobility than for sensory and cognitive difficulties. Of all people with any functional difficulty, 71% self-reported an unmet need for AP. Most products were home or self-made, at low cost, but provided benefits. Needs and unmet needs for AP are high, especially for people with greater functional difficulties. Assessing unmet needs for AP revealed important barriers to scale that can inform policy and practice.

Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(12), 2901;
doi:10.3390/ijerph15122901

Access to assistive products in Kurigram and Narsingdi, Bangladesh. Policy brief 2.

HUMANITY & INCLUSION BANGLADESH
et al
August 2018

Expand view

This ‘policy brief’ outlines findings on Assistive technology and Products (AP) needs, unmet needs and access patterns arising the Rapid Assessment of Disability (RAD) study conducted in 2016 and 2017, in partnership between the Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics (BBS) and Humanity & Inclusion (HI) Bangladesh, with technical oversight from the Nossal Institute for Global Health, University of Melbourne, Australia. The study was part of the HI project: Towards Global Health: Strengthening the Rehabilitation Sector through Civil Society funded by the European Union. Findings from the 4254 adults surveyed in the two districts are reported here.

 

The purpose of this component of the RAD study was to learn about the usage of AP, characteristics of AP users, barriers to use of AP, unmet and met needs of AP, and to highlight major policy implications for AP service provision, in two target areas of Kurigram and Narsingdi. The survey includes an adapted version of Washington Group (WG) ‘short set’ of Disability Questions. A modified version of the WHO’s draft Assistive Technology Assessment Tool (needs module) – or the ‘ATA-needs’, was also implemented. Findings from this study also helped modify and improve the draft ATA-needs tool

Humanitarian inclusion standards for older people and people with disabilities

ADCAP
TILL, Celia
et al
February 2018

Expand view

The Humanitarian inclusion standards for older people and people with disabilities provide guidance across all areas and at all stages of emergency response to ensure older people and people with disabilities are not left out.

The standards consist of nine key inclusion standards, including identification, safe and equitable access, knowledge and participation, and learning. Alongside these, there are seven sector-specific inclusion standards, which include protection, shelter, health, and water, sanitation and hygiene.

Each standard comes with key actions, guidance, tools and resources, and case studies illustrating how older people and people with disabilities have been included in humanitarian responses.

The sector-specific standards provide guidance in three key areas: data and information management, addressing barriers to inclusion, and participation of older people and people with disabilities.

By implementing the key action points provided, organisations will build up a greater evidence base, deliver more inclusive programmes, and be able to better demonstrate impact on the lives of those most at risk during humanitarian crises.

The standards can be used as guidance during programme development, implementation and monitoring, and as a resource for training and advocacy.

Assistive technology for children with disabilities: Creating opportunities for education, inclusion and participation. A discussion paper

BORG, Johann
et al
2015

Expand view

Based on evidence, examples (case studies), and a range of information the UNICEF-WHO discussion paper proposes a set of recommendations and actions to ensure every child with a disability has access to quality assistive technologies so that they can flourish and become productive members of society. Some recommended key actions are:

  • Estimate needs and map resources
  • Adopt legislation, policies and strategies
  • Provide funding and increase affordability
  • Set up assistive technology service provision systems
  • Ensure supply of quality assistive products
  • Train personnel
  • Establish partnerships

Disability inclusion in the Syrian refugee response in Lebanon

PEARCE, Emma
July 2013

Expand view

This report presents the key findings and recommendations from a four-week field assessment conducted by the Women's refugee Commission in Spring 2013 in northern and eastern Lebanon. Key findings are shared about the situation of Syrian refugees with disabilities, and recommendations are provided to the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and partners.

The humanitarian emergency settings perceived needs scale (HESPER) : manual with scale

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
KINGS COLLEGE LONDON
2011

Expand view

The HESPER Scale "aims to provide a method for assessing perceived needs in representative samples of populations affected by large-scale humanitarian emergencies in a valid and reliable manner. This manual includes the HESPER Scale (see Appendix 1), as well as a detailed explanation of how to use the HESPER Scale, how to train interviewers, and how to organise, analyze and report on a HESPER survey"

Needs assessment to develop diabetes control and prevention projects in limited-resource countries

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
June 2009

Expand view

This toolkit provides a guide for international NGOs to implement a needs assessment to develop diabetes control and prevention projects in limited-resource countries. This practical toolkit highlights the necessary details for related log books, guides, frameworks, checklists, job descriptions, reports and templates. This guide is useful for organisations interested in needs assessment to develop diabetes control and prevention projects in limited-resource countries

From the perspective of vulnerable persons, persons with injuries/disabilities, and older persons in the current IDP crisis in pakistan : participatory rapid need assessment report

KHIZAI, Dawood Ali
2009

Expand view

"Handicap International conducted a Participatory Rapid needs Assessment from 17-20 May 2009 focusing specifically on vulnerability at both the camp and host community levels. The assessment sought to map: opportunities for vulnerability and disability to be mainstreamed within the IDP response, recognition of vulnerability as an issue at the cluster level, accessibility of existing services and goods to vulnerable people, service delivery gaps related to disability and vulnerability and to explore the specific needs of persons with disabilities who are now IDPs"

Disabled women and domestic violence : making the links|An interim report for the women’ s aid federation of England

HAGUE, Gill
THIARA, Ravi K.
MAGOWAN, Pauline
October 2007

Expand view

This interim report presents a research project which explores disabled women’s experiences of domestic violence and investigates existing service provision available to them. It is "based on two national surveys, one of domestic violence organisations and one of disabled people’s organisations. Specialist facilities and accessible services were in short supply in both sectors. One recurrent issue was lack of secure on-going funding, which held many organisations back from developing their services as fully and inclusively they might wish. The provision of appropriate training, and improved liaison between the two sectors, would help to provide a better service for disabled women experiencing abuse"

Excreta disposal in emergencies : a field manual

HARVEY, Peter
2007

Expand view

This manual gives practical guidance on how to select, design, construct and maintain appropriate excreta disposal systems to reduce faecal transmission risks and protect public health in emergency situations. It outlines the key issues to be considered when assessing excreta disposal needs and priorities, and provides guidance on how to plan, design and construct appropriate systems, and on how to maintain and promote appropriate use of those systems. It is designed for use by field-based technicians, engineers and non-technical staff responsible for sanitation planning, management and intervention in emergencies

Promoting young people's sexual and reproductive health : dynamic contextual analysis

CHALMERS, Helen
et al
January 2006

Expand view

This resource offers a new approach to understanding and developing work to meet the sexual and reproductive health needs of young people. After setting out the key principles which inform a Dynamic Contextual Analysis, the guide outlines the three main steps in carrying out such an assessment of needs and opportunities. Policy-makers, practitioners and researchers working to promote young people's sexual health in resource-constrained settings will find this resource particularly useful

eHealth tools and services : needs of the member states. Report of the WHO Global Observatory for eHealth

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO) GLOBAL OBSERVATORY FOR EHEALTH
2006

Expand view

This is a report on some of the findings of a global survey on eHealth carried out by the Global Observatory for eHealth (GOe), concerning the needs for eHealth tools and services. The survey found that WHO Member States would welcome an active involvement of WHO in the development of generic eHealth tools, while particularly non-OECD members would benefit form guidance on eHealth issues. It also found that needs vary even among OECD countries, and that existing eHealth tools and services should be better known. The report recommends that WHO should actively intervene in the provision of generic tools (eg, drug registries, patient record systems, health professional directories), facilitate access to existing tools, promote knowledge exchange, provide eHealth information and promote eLearning programmes

Eldis OnDisc : Feasibility study for document caching and CD-ROM creation and distribution project

INSTITUTE OF DEVELOPMENT STUDIES
June 2005

Expand view

This report documents the Institute of Development Studies' investigation into the feasibility of creating Eldis OnDisc, a CD-ROM derived from their extensive website of development information. This report provides: background to the proposal, description of how the feasibility study was conducted, findings from the user survey, publisher survey, and other interviews, recommended next steps, and suggested budget. Annexes include user and publisher surveys, potential copyright agreements, and user and publisher responses to their proposal. The report concludes that there is a substantial market for offline distribution of Eldis-identified documents, and that publishers and distributors seem very interested in participating in this. Key findings from the survey are that: users still have problems accessing full text on the internet and have a need for offline access to such content, for both their own work and that of their colleagues; publishers are generally willing to release copyright, but there is a major logistical task in collecting the agreements although there is a growing interest in open-source content provision; users see value in a range of disc formats, including both single subject and multiple subject discs; and finally, small scale, high-impact distribution is possible. The business case for Eldis' involvement in such distribution is leverage of the IDS network of information service consumers

Practical guide to multilateral needs assessments in post-conflict situations

KIEVELITZ, Uwe
et al
August 2004

Expand view

This practical guide presents information about post-conflict needs assessments and includes details relating to context, recovery phase links and various settings. It reviews key conceptual issues, provides recommendations on managing the needs assessment process and presents estimated costs. Supporting figures and boxes are used to highlight sequenced steps, phrases and responsibilites. The guide would be useful for anyone who is undertaking a post-conflict needs assessment

Participatory rural communication appraisal : starting with the people

ANYAEGBUNAM, Chike
MEFALOPULOS, Paolo
MOETSABI, Titus
2004

Expand view

Designed primarily as a field guide for development workers and extension staff, this handbook provides a simple, easy-to-follow procedure for planning cost-effective and appropriate communication programmes. Steps include: situation analysis, baseline surveys and a range of participatory tools and techniques to profile exisiting communication channels and methods, and develop appropriate communication programmes. It can be used as a reference for conducting participatory rural communication appraisal (PRCA) in the field as well as a training guide for capacity building in PRCA

Tecnologías de la información y comunicaciones

MONTEAGUDO Peña, José Luis
2004

Expand view

Information and communication technologies are essential to support professional research activities in biomedicine and health. Their adoption and use is linked to efficiency and competitiveness. After needs analysis, ICTs applications whose use is recommended, are identified. Needs refer to activities linked to the execution of research projects but also to teaching, continuous training and professional development. Based on that, it is proposed a formative programme structure with different competence levels and with a combination of horizontal common general skills and vertical specialization areas. Finally, it is highlighted that new technologies facilitate new instruments but also they represent new working cultures and present new ethical and legal dilemmas to the researchers that would need to be educated in new working environments

Making information user-driven

LLOYD-LANEY, Megan
March 2003

Expand view

This brief document describes the issues and priorities involved in making information accessible. It explains that tailoring information to suit your audience increases the likelihood that your information will be accessed and taken up. To provide user-driven information it is important to understand who your target audience is, what information they want/need, how they access information and whether you are trying to inform or influence your audience. With this knowledge you can provide the information your target audience wants, in media they can use, and place your information where your audience will look for it. If you are clear about who has produced the information, who it is intended for and its purpose, the user can make informed decisions about the value of your information. Involving end users in research is also more likely to produce outputs that are quickly disseminated and taken up. Awareness of the strategic role of information within your organisation can be enhanced by encouraging all organisation members to become involved in identifying information needs, dissemination and community building

A manual for CBR planners

THOMAS, Maya
THOMAS, M J
Eds
2003

Expand view

This manual for community-based rehabilitation planners has 13 sections and contains a very useful overview of the history of CBR with valuable introductory reading for newcomers to the field. The subsequent six sections cover planning, needs assessment and include suggestions of how to understand local communities and encourage community participation in CBR programmes. The final six sections are concerned with programme management issues; for example, as organising self-help groups, training personnel for CBR, and the sustainability of projects including evaluation and management of change

Pages

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

Subscribe to updates