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Inclusive and integrated mother, newborn and child health programming: Beyond mortality

OLCHINI, Davide
November 2017

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This policy paper describes the operational terms of Handicap International’s mandate and values as applied to Mother, Neonatal and Child Health (MNCH). Presenting the approaches and references underpinning Handicap International’s actions, choices and commitments, its purpose is to ensure consistency across its practices while taking account of different contexts. Intended as a document to guide programme staff, the paper defines the topic, describes the target populations and sets out the methods of intervention (activities and expected results) and the indicators used to monitor and evaluate. It also aims to ensure that Handicap International programmes implement all projects in accordance with the presented methods of intervention

 

The SDGs focus on a broader scope of activities and are thus slowly but surely shifting from mortality to address in a more comprehensive manner the well-being and achievement of maximum potential for children and adolescents. With a robust component in sexual and reproductive health, this represents a significant frame of reference for Handicap International’s work in MNCH as it has paved the way for integrating MNCH-related impairments into existing health services. The framework of the SDGs provides a clear vision of the importance of multi-sectorial interventions, which encompass the limit of vertically-organised health systems centred on curative aspects, to offer a more integrated and preventive package of interventions that include chronic conditions, impairments and health for all. After many years of implementing MNCH projects, Handicap International is well-positioned and firmly established as a major player in this process.

State of the world's mothers 2008 : closing the survival gap for children under 5

SAVE THE CHILDREN USA
May 2008

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This report shows which countries are succeeding - and which are failing - to deliver basic health care to the mothers and children who need it most. It examines where the health care gaps between the poorest and best-off children are widest, and where they are smallest. It also looks at the survival gaps between the rich and poor children in developing countries, and shows how millions of children’s lives could be saved by ensuring all children get essential, low-cost health care

Taking critical services to the home : scaling-up home-based maternal and postnatal care, including family planning, through community midwifery in Kenya

MWANGI, Annie
WARREN, Charlotte
2008

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This publication is the report of a project to scale-up a community-based model, in Kenya, that enabled women to give birth safely at home or be referred to a hospital when attended by a self-employed skilled midwife living in the community. The findings of the project were that community midwifery contributed to increasing the proportion of women assisted by skilled attendants during birth in the four districts in which the scheme was trialed, amounting to just under half of all skilled attended births in the districts. Although the skilled birth attendant rate in these districts was well below the national average of 42 percent, there was a steady increase in the proportion of attended deliveries since CMs were introduced in 2005. The districts also reported an increase in postnatal assessments in the first 48 hours and increase in immunization coverage

Achieving the Millennium Development Goal of improving maternal health : determinants, interventions and challenges

LULE, Elizabeth
et al
2005

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"This paper summarizes the importance of improving maternal and reproductive health, the progress made to date and lessons learned, and the major challenges confronting programs today. The paper highlights the progress that some countries, including very poor ones, have made in reducing maternal mortality, but cautions that progress in many countries remains slow. Relying on evidence from the most recent research and survey information, the paper also analyzes the key determinants and evidence on effective interventions for attaining the maternal health MDG. The paper finds that key interventions to improve maternal and reproductive health and reduce maternal mortality include the following mutually reinforcing strategies: (a) mobilizing political commitment and fostering an enabling policy environment; (b) investing in social and economic development such as female education, poverty reduction, and improvements in women’s status; (c) providing family planning services; (d) ensuring quality antenatal care, skilled attendance during childbirth, and availability of emergency obstetric services for pregnancy complications; and (e) strengthening the health system and community involvement. The paper emphasizes that carrying out interventions remains a challenge in environments where political commitment, policies, as well as institutions and health systems, are weak. The paper concludes with guiding lessons from some of the countries that have successfully improved maternal health and with a discussion of some of the difficulties of measuring maternal mortality and morbidity outcomes"

Make every mother and child count : World Health Day 7 April 2005. A toolkit for organizers of activities

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION
2005

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This toolkit has been designed for organisations promoting activities and events for the World Health Day 2005, and particularly concerned with the survival and well-being of mothers and children. It spells out four key messages: too many mothers and children are suffering and dying each year; healthy mothers and children are the real wealth of societies; millions of lives could be saved using the knowledge available today; in order to make a difference stakeholders must join forces and act together

UN Millennium Project 2005 : who's got the power? Transforming health systems for women and children. Task Force on Child Health and Maternal Health

FREEDMAN, Lynn P
et al
2005

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This report has been produced by the Task Force on Child Health and Maternal Health. It identifies technical interventions needed to address the problems of high rates of maternal mortality, continued child deaths due to preventable illnesses, unmet need for sexual and reproductive health services, and weak and fragile health systems. The report also asserts that policymakers must act now to change the fundamental societal dynamics that currently prevent those most in need from accessing quality health care

Reducing maternal mortality : learning from Bolivia, China, Egypt, Honduras, Indonesia, Jamaica, and Zimbabwe

KOBLINSKY, Marjorie
2003

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"To assist countries in their efforts to improve maternal health and reduce maternal mortality, the World Bank is publishing two volumes: Investing in Maternal Health: Learning from Malaysia and Sri Lanka, and Reducing Maternal Mortality: Learning from Bolivia, China, Egypt, Honduras, Indonesia, Jamaica, and Zimbabwe. These two books offer success stories in improving health and reducing maternal mortality in a range of developing countries. The first book is based on the experiences of Malaysia and Sri Lanka during the past five to six decades. The second book discusses the more recent experiences of Bolivia, China (Yunnan), Egypt, Honduras, Indonesia, Jamaica, and Zimbabwe. These nine countries have made important strides in improving maternal health, and these two books outline what worked and what did not"

CBIA : improving the quality of self-medication through mothers' active learning

SURYAWATI, Sri
2003

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Self-medication is beneficial for the treatment of minor ailments but only if there is sufficient knowledge about the correct use of medicines. This article looks at the pieces of information required by mothers for appropriate self-medication. CBIA (Cara Belajar Ibu Aktif) is an abbreviation for Mothers' Active Learning Method. CBIA uses a problem-based approach and self learning process. Information printed on the pharmaceutical package is used as training material. The training is intended to empower mothers to seek and critically assess information on the drugs they commonly use and to increase drug procurement efficiency in households. The article looks at conducting CBIA sessions and how far it is an effective method. The CBIA approach was found to be effective in increasing knowledge and reducing the number of medical products used and mothers found this type of problem-based learning to be enjoyable

A new door opened : a tracer study of the Teenage Mothers Project, Jamaica

DEGAZON -JOHNSON, Roli
June 2001

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This tracer study assesses the impact of the teenage mothers project on a sample of the mothers and children who participated between 1986 and 1989. The project took an all-embracing approach that encompassed the development of the young women, stimulation and care for the babies, support in the home and contact with the babies' fathers. This report shows how 'a new door opened' for former participants in developing their resilience following the birth of their first child and arresting a negative life trend. The study also supports the position that interventions that promote parenting education, strong mother-child bonding and early stimulation can have a long-term positive development impact on children aged between one and three

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