Resources search

Learning From Experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies for hygiene at home for people with high support needs.

World Vision/CBM Australia
May 2018

Expand view

This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HYGIENE AT HOME FOR PEOPLE WITH HIGH SUPPORT NEEDS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes strategies that used to assist households and individuals in hygiene tasks at home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka.

NOTE: The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

Assistive products for children with disabilities guide

UNICEF
March 2018

Expand view

UNICEF has issued an Assistive Products guide which addresses needs in four impairment groups: mobility, vision, hearing, and communication.  It provides details of some assistive products currently available on the market and information on when and how they are to be used. It covers a range of devices, from low-tech (e.g., walking sticks, pencil grips) to more complex (e.g., specialized computer software/hardware or motorised wheelchairs). This publication provides practical information to guide UNICEF, partner agencies and Governments in procurement planning and provisioning of assistive products. The information is designed to help with decision-making on the most appropriate assistive products to meet programme objectives and realise the rights of children with disabilities. The selection of assistive products in this overview is based on the World Health Organization’s (WHO’s) 2016 Assistive Products Priority List (APL). References to particular brands and models are only illustrative examples available at the time of publication and do not constitute an endorsement of the manufacturer by UNICEF. Indicative prices listed are in US dollars.

Wheelchair Service Provision Course

LOWE, Rachel
RAU, Barbara
2018

Expand view

This MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) aims to provide a basic theoretical understanding of wheelchair mobility and to develop an understanding of the theoretical principles, skills and knowledge underlying the management skills and knowledge in the management of wheelchair service delivery.  Starting on 3 September 2018 and lasting for 4 weeks, it will involve around 4-6 hours of work each week (depending on your learning style)

This course is aimed at Physiotherapy and Physical Therapy professionals, clinicians, students and assistants. It will introduce the role of the wheelchair in mobility, explore assessment and the roles of the multidisciplinary team in wheelchair service delivery, as well as provide a theoretical understanding of management techniques and related clinical considerations. It will not teach practical skills or lead to any clinical qualification. 

 

Learning from experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies to modify existing household toilets and water access

WORLD VISION
CBM Australia
2018

Expand view

This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HOME MODIFICATIONS FOR WASH ACCESS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes the strategies which were used to assist people with disabilities to access toilet and water facilities at their own home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka. Houses and toilet structures in the region were made of brick and concrete. No new toilets were built and modifications involved only minor work to existing household structures, water points and toilets.

NOTE:
The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

Right to health: Reality of persons with spina bifida and hydrocephalus

MCPHERSON. Amy
January 2017

Expand view

"This report maps the situation of persons with SBH in relation to healthcare access and is a follow up of the CRPD Concluding Observations Art.25. Through a comprehensive survey, IF collected valuable data on the experiences, satisfaction, and perceptions of healthcare coverage of individuals with SBH across Europe. Based on its findings, the financial coverage of treatment and assistive products for patients with SBH is grossly insufficient across the EU. Europe as a whole lacks multidisciplinary care and specialised SBH teams, which translates into long waiting times and insufficient knowledge of the SBH specificities. 

Considering these findings, IF urges the EU Member States to adequately support the healthcare needs of persons with SBH, and to invest more substantially into creating multidisciplinary clinics that can help avoid preventable complications 11 and may reduce the overall burden 12 on the patient and the system. In addition, the Member States should actively support creation of the European Reference Networks as a way of improving care for persons with SBH. IF also calls on the European institutions for support in training medical professionals on rights of persons with disabilities."

School and classroom disabilities inclusion guide for low- and middle-income countries

BULAT, Jennae
HAYES, Anne
et al
January 2017

Expand view

This guide provides strategies and recommendations for developing inclusive classrooms and schools. We specifically address the needs of Sub-Saharan African countries, which lack the resources for implementing inclusive education. However, our strategies and recommendations can be equally useful in other contexts where inclusive education practices have not yet been adopted. Strategies for enhancing existing school and classroom environment and instruction include: modify the physical environment; modify classroom managment strategies; ensure social inclusion; adopt best instructional practices; apply strategies for students with sensory disabilities; and use assistive technologies. Strategies for adopting response to intervention include: tier by tier implementation; individualised education plans; and planning for school wide adoption of inclusive practices and a multilevel system of support.

 

 

'Brain training' technique restores feeling and movement to paraplegic patients

RADFORD, Tim
August 2016

Expand view

It is reported that eight paraplegics – some of them paralysed for more than a decade by severe spinal cord injury – have been able to move their legs and feel sensation, after help from an artificial exoskeleton, sessions using virtual reality (VR) technology and a non-invasive system that links the brain with a computer. "After just 10 months of what the Brazilian medical team “brain training” they have been able to make a conscious decision to move and then get a response from muscles that have not been used for a decade". The work is part of the Walk Again Project.

Long-term training with a brain-machine interface-based gait protocol induces partial neurological recovery in paraplegic patients.

NICOLELIS, Miguel
et al
August 2016

Expand view

"Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) provide a new assistive strategy aimed at restoring mobility in severely paralyzed patients. Yet, no study in animals or in human subjects has indicated that long-term BMI training could induce any type of clinical recovery. Eight chronic (3–13 years) spinal cord injury (SCI) paraplegics were subjected to long-term training (12 months) with a multi-stage BMI-based gait neurorehabilitation paradigm aimed at restoring locomotion. This paradigm combined intense immersive virtual reality training, enriched visual-tactile feedback, and walking with two EEG-controlled robotic actuators, including a custom-designed lower limb exoskeleton capable of delivering tactile feedback to subjects. Following 12 months of training with this paradigm, all eight patients experienced neurological improvements in somatic sensation (pain localization, fine/crude touch, and proprioceptive sensing) in multiple dermatomes. Patients also regained voluntary motor control in key muscles below the SCI level, as measured by EMGs, resulting in marked improvement in their walking index. As a result, 50% of these patients were upgraded to an incomplete paraplegia classification. Neurological recovery was paralleled by the reemergence of lower limb motor imagery at cortical level". It is hypothesised that this unprecedented neurological recovery results from both cortical and spinal cord plasticity triggered by long-term BMI usage."

Scientific Reports 6, Article number: 30383 (2016)
doi:10.1038/srep30383

Conduct an accessibility audit in low and middle income countries

NOUVELLET, Hugues
June 2014

Expand view

This guide aims to assist professionals in conducting an accessibility audit, and is aimed at Handicap International professionals who have responsibility for developing, implementing or analysing accessibility activities. Within the framework of inclusive local development, an accessibility audit is a complex, substantial and technical process to implement involving a large number of different stakeholders, increase time preparation and technical specialised skills for making recommendations to remove barriers. An accessibility audit is a participatory democracy exercise which can be used as the basis to form relationships between stakeholders in a municipality accessibility commission or even a municipality commission for inclusive development, who will have responsibility for suggesting, studying, organising and implementing actions to improve accessibility

The provision of wheeled mobility and positioning devices

GARTON, Francesca
June 2013

Expand view

This policy paper describes Handicap International’s mandate and values in operational terms as applied to the theme of provision of wheeled mobility and positioning devices. It presents the approaches and references for Handicap International’s actions, choices and commitments. It aims to ensure coherence in terms of practices whilst taking into account different contexts. Essentially this is a guidance document for programme staff which defines the topic and outlines the target populations, methods of intervention (expected results, activities) and indicators for monitoring and evaluation. This policy aims to ensure that all projects carried out by Handicap International programmes are consistent with the methods of intervention presented
PP 09

Wheelchair service training package : intermediate level (WSTP-I)

KHASNABIS, Chapal
MINES, Kylie
Eds
2013

Expand view

This wheelchair service training package is the second part of the WHO wheelchair service training package series and addresses the needs of people who have severe difficulties in walking and moving around and also having poor postural control. Special attention was given on the provision of appropriate wheelchairs for children who have poor postural control and are unable to sit upright independently. It is designed to support the training of personnel or volunteers to provide an appropriate manual wheelchair and cushion for children and adults who need additional postural support to sit upright
Note: A Trainers manual, Reference manual for participants, Participant’s workbook and Posters are available from the link above
Note: A DVD is available upon request which contains all the necessary forms and checklists; manuals and guides including the trainer’s manual; and sets of posters and presentations

The provision of wheeled mobility and positioning devices

GARTON, Francesca
URSEAU, Isabelle
July 2012

Expand view

This policy brief provides an overview of Handicap International’s 2012 policy paper on the provision of wheeled mobility and positioning devices (WP&MD) for people with disabilities
PP Brief No 9
Note: this policy should be read in conjunction with Handicap International’s rehabilitation policy paper which provides a broad framework for understanding the organization’s work on rehabilitation, including WP & MD

Wheelchair service training package : basic level (WSTP-B)

KHASNABIS, Chapal
MINES, Kylie
2012

Expand view

The main purpose of the training package is to develop the minimum skills and knowledge required by personnel involved in wheelchair service delivery. An important aim of the training package is to get it integrated into the regular paramedical/rehabilitation training programs such as physiotherapy, occupational therapy, prosthetics and orthotics, rehabilitation nursing
The package contains necessary forms and checklists, manuals and guides including trainer’s manual and set of posters and presentations. First click "Strat.pdf" which will come with four tabs - click tab "Manuals and guides" - open the Trainer’s manual to prepare yourself to deliver the training. Then click the "Timetable and sessions" tab to open the timetable. Click the hyperlinks of each session, which lead you to the exact slides and video location. The best way to deliver the training is to proceed through the lessons in sequential order respecting the timing allotted for each session as much as possible
Note: The whole training package is available on the Website for the training institutes and wheelchair service providers. It is recommended to download the complete package (requires 3 GB space)

Joint position paper on the provision of mobility devices in less resourced settings : a step towards implementation of the convention on the rights of persons with disabilities (CRPD) related to personal mobility

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (USAID)
2011

Expand view

"This joint position paper was developed in response to a meeting about personal mobility and mobility devices, held on 28-29 October 2009 at World Health Organization headquarters, Geneva, Switzerland. This paper aims to guide and support countries, especially those with limited resources, in the implementation of relevant articles of the CRPD associated with the provision of mobility devices"

Guidelines on the provision of manual wheelchairs in less resourced settings

ARMSTRONG, William
et al
2008

Expand view

These guidelines are designed to promote personal mobility and enhance the quality of life of wheelchair users. The aim is to assist Member States in developing a system of wheelchair provision that is consistent with the implementation of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Chapter topics includes: design and production, service delivery, training, and policy planning

4th all Africa wheelchair congress report|Theme : advancing appropriate wheelchair services for Africa

THE PAN AFRICA WHEELCHAIR BUILDERS ASSOCIATION (PAWBA)
The Tanzanian Training Centre for Orthopaedic Technologists (TATCOT)
2007

Expand view

This report summarises the findings of the 4th All Africa Wheelchair Congress the theme of which was to assess how to advance appropriate wheelchair services across the African continent. This report explores a range of key topics including: impact of wheelchairs on quality of life; partnership for appropriate wheelchair services (from a global and African perspective); wheelchair technology training; wheelchair services and poverty reduction strategy; conventions and guidelines; and capacity building
4th All Africa Wheelchair Congress Report
Uhuru Hotel, Moshi
17-21 September 2007

Walking aid compliance in children with spastic diplegia

RAJA, Kavitha
2005

Expand view

[Author's abstract] : A three month prospective self report study of 50 children using different types of walkers or elbow crutches was done to determine compliance with use of the prescribed device. Data were collected by means of log entries made by the child's care givers throughout the day. The data collected consisted of number of times and the distance the child walked each time. Overall mean compliance was 49.1%. Children using the reciprocal walker showed the greatest compliance while those using walkers with gutter attachments and elbow crutches showed the least. Compliance was greatest for distances of 50-100m while it was the least for distances over 150m

The relationship between prosthetics and orthotics services and community based rehabilitation (CBR)

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR PROSTHETICS AND ORTHOTICS (ISPO)
November 2003

Expand view

"This document attempts to describe the relationship between prosthetics and orthotics services and community-based rehabilitation activities. It shows how the services offered by central/specialized, provincial and district institutions and the community can work together to provide a comprehensive prosthetics and orthotics service across the country. It should be noted that no definitive model of community based rehabilitation in prosthetics and orthotics is available; each country requires to develop its own system according to its needs and the resources available"

Computer technologies for postsecondary students with disabilities : Adaptech Project|Technologies Informatiques pour les etudiants ayant des incapacites au postsecondaire : Project Adaptech

FOSSEY, Myrtis-Eirene
et al
2001

Expand view

This study and report on computer technologies for post-secondary students with disabilities explores the ways in which computers can address the barriers to learning faced by students with visual or hearing impairments, learning disabilities and mobility impairments. It would be useful for anyone with an interest in assistive computer technologies. The French version of this report follows the English version

Pages

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

Subscribe to updates