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Everywhere the bombing followed us. Forced displacement and the use of explosive weapons in populated areas. Perspectives of Syrian women refugees in Lebanon

BEAUJOLAIS, Aurelie
September 2017

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Based on a survey of 205 Syrian refugees in Lebanon and in-depth interviews with 14 Syrian women refugees originally from different towns and cities in Syria, and additional research, this study confirms that the use of explosive weapons in populated areas drives multiple forced displacements and induces a pattern of displacement that increases the vulnerability of civilians. Quantitative data collected during the survey confirms the correlation between multiple forced displacements and the use of the explosive weapons, as almost half of all respondents had been internally displaced prior to seeking external refuge in Lebanon, with an average of 3 internal displacements within their own city. The women interviewed highlighted the deprivation induced by forced displacement. The study also reflects the considerable harm caused by the use of explosive weapons in populated areas in terms of socio-economic vulnerability, linked to the loss of livelihood and the disruption of civilian infrastructure, as well as the long-term impact on mental health. Dire social impacts were emphasised by respondents, namely aid dependence and new restrictions encountered by people living with disabilities, along with a loss of personal dignity, as well as the loss of education for Syrian children

 

Immigration and disability / Review of disability studies - Vol 13, No 2

THE REVIEW OF DISABILITY STUDIES
June 2017

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The latest issue of the Review of Disability Studies is out! Dive into this issues' topics ranging for Disability Studies in Physical Recreation, Social Participation of Children, Immigrants in Australia, Anxiety as a Tool for Critical Disability Studies, Film Genre and Mental Illness and much more.

Mental health and trauma in asylum seekers landing in Sicily in 2015: a descriptive study of neglected invisible wounds

CREPET, Anna
RITA, Francesco
REID, Anthony
et al
January 2017

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Abstract

 

Background

 

In 2015, Italy was the second most common point of entry for asylum seekers into Europe after Greece. The vast majority embarked from war-torn Libya; 80,000 people claimed asylum that year. Their medical conditions were assessed on arrival but their mental health needs were not addressed in any way, despite the likelihood of serious trauma before and during migration. Médecins sans Frontières (MSF), in agreement with the Italian Ministry of Health, provided mental health (MH) assessment and care for recently-landed asylum seekers in Sicily. This study documents mental health conditions, potentially traumatic events and post-migratory living difficulties experienced by asylum seekers in the MSF programme in 2014–15.

 

Methods

 

All asylum seekers transiting the 15 MSF-supported centres were invited to a psycho-educational session. A team of psychologists and cultural mediators then provided assessment and care for those identified with MH conditions. Potentially traumatic events experienced before and during the journey, as well as post-migratory living difficulties, were recorded. All those diagnosed with MH conditions from October 2014 to December 2015 were included in the study.

 

Results

 

Among 385 individuals who presented themselves for a MH screening during the study period, 193 (50%) were identified and diagnosed with MH conditions. Most were young, West African males who had left their home-countries more than a year prior to arrival. The most common MH conditions were post traumatic stress disorder (31%) and depression (20%). Potentially traumatic events were experienced frequently in the home country (60%) and during migration (89%). Being in a combat situation or at risk of death, having witnessed violence or death and having been in detention were the main traumas. Lack of activities, worries about home, loneliness and fear of being sent home were the main difficulties at the AS centres.

 

Conclusion

 

MH conditions, potentially traumatic events and post-migratory living difficulties are commonly experienced by recently-arrived ASs, this study suggests that mental health and psychosocial support and improved living circumstances should be integrated into European medical and social services provided by authorities in order to fulfil their humanitarian responsibility and reduce the burden of assimilation on receiving countries.

 

Keywords

 

Immigration Asylum seekers Refugee Mental health Italy Europe Traumatic event Operational research

Asia Education Summit on Flexible Learning Strategies for Out-of-School Children

UNESCO
November 2016

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The Asia Education Summit on Flexible Learning Strategies for Out-of-School Children (24-26 February 2016) brought more than 550 education and learning colleagues from across the Asian Region and world to Bangkok, Thailand. The Summit welcomed 121 speakers and over 100 government officials. More than two-thirds of the Summit’s participants were NGO representatives and educators in the region who were, and currently are working “on the ground” in efforts with and for out-of-school children (OOSC).  This report aims to highlight and give voice to the unique innovative initiatives and flexible learning strategies shared during the course of this three-day summit. Each presentation summary in this report is intended to stand alone, while contributing to the collaborative nature and understanding of the innovations and FLS for OOSC presented. Presentations inlcuded "Sustainable and Innovative Financing for Disabled and Disadvantaged OOSC in Thailand: Mae Hong Son Model"

Making migration accessible: Inclusive relocation for people with disabilities

GHENIS, Alex
February 2016

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Factors associated with complex and specific needs of people with disabilities who become migrants owing to climate change are discussed and rights of disabled migrants as covered by  UNCRPD Article 11: Situations of Risk and Humanitarian Emergencies and UNCRPD Article 18: Liberty of Movement and Nationality are highlighted. The challenge of disability-inclusive planning to incorporate migrants with disabilities in a way that maintains health, physical access and necessary support throughout the migration or relocation process and once at their destination is reported. This involves maximizing accessibility of transit and infrastructure (namely temporary camps, long-term housing and public spaces); maintaining personal care and communal support networks; and guaranteeing vital health-care and social services.

Migration, Environment and Climate Change: Policy Brief Series: Issue 6 | Vol. 2 | June 2016

The gap report

THE JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV AND AIDS (UNAIDS)
July 2014

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The goal of this report is to provide the best possible data on the global AIDS epidemic, with a particular focus on information and analysis on the people left behind. The report highlights these gaps firstly in regional terms, providing “Regional Snapshots” and then explores issues faced by the following 12 populations that have been left behind by the AIDS response: people living with HIV, adolescent girls and young women, prisoners, migrants, people who inject drugs, sex workers, gay men and other men who have sex with men, transgender people, children and pregnant women living with HIV, displaced persons, people with disabilities and people aged 50 years and older

Guidance on infant feeding and HIV in the context of refugees and displaced populations

LHOTSKA, Lida
MCGRATH, Marie
2008

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This Guidance on Infant feeding and HIV aims to assist in policy formation and decision-making strategies on infant feeding and HIV in refugees and displaced populations. Its purpose is to provide an overview of the current consensus on infant feeding and HIV, and to give guidance to facilitate implementation of HIV and infant feeding programmes in refugee and displaced situations, in emergency contexts, and as an integral element of a coordinated approach to public health, HIV and nutrition programming

The medical peace work textbook

ROWSON, M
MELF, K
Eds
2008

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This textbook provides an introduction to medical peace work and includes chapters relating to human rights; the causes and health effects of war and violent conflict; how health workers can promote peace-building and reconstruction; and the health and well-being needs of refugees and immigrants. The book is aimed at doctors, nurses, public health workers and other health professionals, and students. This e-textbook is part of an online course on Medical Peace Work. The book can be consulted, downloaded, or printed for free without registering for the course

Humanitarian reform : fulfilling its promise?

COULDREY, Marion
Ed
December 2007

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This is a special issue of the Forced Migration Review. It includes articles relating to Iraq, Darfur, Colombia, Bulgaria, Bhutanese refugees, accountability protection, profiling internally displaced populations, and the role of the private sector

Tackling social exclusion in health and education : case studies from Asia

GARDENER, Janet
SUBRAHMANIAN, Ramya
July 2006

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This paper draws together some of the lessons from a study to identify ways of tackling social exclusion through promising practices in health and education in the Asia region. It uncovers some of the processes through which ethnic minorities, disadvantaged castes, the ultra-poor, women and migrants have been excluded; outlines the ways in which projects have identified social exclusion and found ways to realign incentives for greater inclusion; and seeks to draw programmatic lessons for the design and implementation of more effective responses

Deadly links between mobility and HIV/AIDS

DODSON, Belinda
CRUSH, Jonathan
Eds
March 2006

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This volume of 'Crossings' is devoted to articles looking at the two-way connections between migration and HIV & AIDS. Not only can migration put people at greater risk of infection or reduce their access to medical care, but HIV & AIDS can also drive migration - both of adults and children

Scaling up access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support: the next steps

Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
2006

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This is a review of country and regional consultations undertaken by UNAIDS, following the United Nations' Political Declaration on HIV and AIDS in June 2006. It explores barriers to UNAIDS' commitment to ensure universal access to comprehensive HIV prevention programmes, treatment, care and support by 2010; and it identifies the next steps that need to be taken for this to become a reality. The key messages are the need for: supportive and protective legislation and programmes to ensure the rights of people living with HIV, women and most-at-risk populations; predictable and sustainable funding for all credible AIDS plans; more trained health care professionals and improved health care systems; and affordable medication, testing and prevention programmes. The review also examines the role of civil society and of faith-based organisations in supporting people with HIV through treatment compliance, prevention, support, care and reducing stigma. It recommends that the high level of response should continue, that targets need to be set and accountability mechanisms improved

Forced migration and public health

ROBERTS, Bayard
July 2004

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This research guide provides a broad view of some of the key themes, issues and debates that encompass public health and forced migration, along with a number of references and web links to sources for further study in this field

Population movement and HIV/AIDS : the case of Ruili, Yunnan, China

DU GUERNAY, Jacques
HSU, Lee-Nah
HING, Cao
August 2003

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This paper evaluates a programme in Ruili in south-west China. It looks at how the population movements driven by development contribute to the HIV epidemic in the area and its implications for the programme. It aims to identify policy and programme instruments which could reduce development-induced vulnerabilities and increase resilience

HIV/AIDS prevention, care and support : stories from the community

RUSCHKAMP, S
et al
April 2003

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Touches on development dynamics (includig poverty, gender, inequality, low levels of education, population mobility and lack of access to basic services), which feature in the spread of HIV and AIDS in Asia. It shares positive ideas and creative solutions for action to stop the spread of HIV/AIDS. It is a collection of stories of community partners working together, including local responses to the challenges of HIV and AIDS

The one to watch : radio, new ICTs and interactivity

GIRARD, Bruce
Ed
2003

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This book presents examples of converging radio and new ICTs for development. The radio/telecommunications combination is helping keep communities together despite the distances imposed by migration. The book argues that radio will have even greater significance and value in years to come. It is split into five sections; concepts and context, gateways, networks, communication with migrants and rural radio. It features case studies where methods have been tried and proven

Preventing HIV/AIDS and promoting sexual health among especially vulnerable young people

SHAW, Cathy
AGGLETON, Peter
July 2002

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This good practice guide introduces practitioners, policy-makers and researchers to two distinct but related concepts - risk and vulnerability. The guide explores how gender, race, culture, sexuality and social status all influence young people's experiences of sexual relationships and makes some more vulnerable to poor sexual health. Using case studies from Africa, Asia, Latin America and Europe, this resource sets out guidelines to inform work with especially vulnerable young people (including young people who sell sex, young people who inject drugs, and young migrants and refugees)

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