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Maternal and new-born care practices among disabled women, and their attendance in community groups in rural Makwanpur, Nepal

LEONARD CHESHIRE DISABILITY AND INCLUSIVE DEVELOPMENT CENTRE
2013

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This paper presents qualitative and quantitative research that describes the type and severity of disability of married women in the study area, describes their participation in community groups and analyses associations between maternal and new-born care behaviours and disability. Health workers and field researchers were also interviewed about their experience with disabled women in rural Makwanpur
Cross-cutting Disability Research Programme, Background Paper: 01

Access to health care, reproductive health and disability: A large scale survey in Sierra Leone

GROCE, Nora
TRANI, Jean-Francois
BROWN, Joyce Brown
KETT, Maria
BAH, Osman
MORLAI, Teddy
BAILEY, Nicki
2011

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This is the first study to compare health status and access to health care services between disabled and non-disabled men and women in urban and peri-urban areas of Sierra Leone. It pays particular attention to access to reproductive health care services and maternal health care for disabled women. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 2009 in 5 districts of Sierra Leone, randomly selecting 17 clusters for a total sample of 425 households. All adults who were identified as being disabled, as well as a control group of randomly selected non-disabled adults, were interviewed about health and reproductive health. As expected, we showed that people with severe disabilities had less access to public health care services than non-disabled people after adjustment for other socioeconomic characteristics (bivariate modelling). However, there were no significant differences in reporting use of contraception between disabled and non-disabled people; contrary to expectations, women with disabilities were as likely to report access to maternal health care services as did non-disabled women. Rather than disability, it is socioeconomic inequality that governs access to such services. We also found that disabled women were as likely as non-disabled women to report having children and to desiring another child: they are not only sexually active, but also need access to reproductive health services.

Analysing commitments to advance the global strategy for women's and children's health|The PMNCH 2011 report

THE PARTNERSHIP FOR MATERNAL, NEWBORN & CHILD HEALTH (PMNCH)
2011

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"This report seeks to further our collective understanding of the current Global Strategy commitments, facilitating more effective advocacy to advance the Every Woman, Every Child effort, as well as greater accountability in line with the recommendations of the Commission on Information and Accountability for Women’s and Children’s Health. This 2011 report is based on structured interviews with those who made commitments, supplemented by reviews of related documentation. This report analyses the specific nature of each commitment recorded through May 2011 to produce a preliminary picture of the achievements of the Global Strategy commitments to date, as well as to identify opportunities and challenges for advancement"

Taking critical services to the home : scaling-up home-based maternal and postnatal care, including family planning, through community midwifery in Kenya

MWANGI, Annie
WARREN, Charlotte
2008

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This publication is the report of a project to scale-up a community-based model, in Kenya, that enabled women to give birth safely at home or be referred to a hospital when attended by a self-employed skilled midwife living in the community. The findings of the project were that community midwifery contributed to increasing the proportion of women assisted by skilled attendants during birth in the four districts in which the scheme was trialed, amounting to just under half of all skilled attended births in the districts. Although the skilled birth attendant rate in these districts was well below the national average of 42 percent, there was a steady increase in the proportion of attended deliveries since CMs were introduced in 2005. The districts also reported an increase in postnatal assessments in the first 48 hours and increase in immunization coverage

Integrated management of pregnancy and childbirth : WHO recommended interventions for improving maternal and newborn health

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO), DEPARTMENT OF MAKING PREGNANCY SAFER
2007

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This paper contains five tables listing recommendations to improve maternal and newborn health and survival, through health services, family and community. Table 1. Care in pregnancy, childbirth and postpartum period for mother and newborn infant; Table 2. Place of care, providers, interventions and commodities; Table 3. Home care, family, community and workplace support for the woman during pregnancy and childbirth and for the newborn infant; Table 4. Care for the woman before and between pregancies; Table 5. Pregnant women not wanting child

Obstetric care in poor settings

MILLS, Samuel
et al
2007

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This report explores why maternal mortality continues to be so high in developing countries, and why emergency obstetric services are little utilized, through research carried out in poor areas in Ghana (Kassena-Nankana district), India (Uttar Pradesh state), and Kenya (Nairobi slums)

Key steps for maternal and newborn health care in humanitarian crisis

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO), DEPARTMENT OF MAKING PREGNANCY SAFER
2007

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This document has been prepared for maternal and newborn health experts as well as reproductive health experts coordinating and assisting with emergency care during the humanitarian crisis. It describes the ways to estimate the number of pregnant women and those who are about to deliver, highlights some important aspects of emergency care related to pregnancy, childbirth and newborn care, and describes the content of UN kits for such care in three different scenarios

Reducing maternal mortality : learning from Bolivia, China, Egypt, Honduras, Indonesia, Jamaica, and Zimbabwe

KOBLINSKY, Marjorie
2003

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"To assist countries in their efforts to improve maternal health and reduce maternal mortality, the World Bank is publishing two volumes: Investing in Maternal Health: Learning from Malaysia and Sri Lanka, and Reducing Maternal Mortality: Learning from Bolivia, China, Egypt, Honduras, Indonesia, Jamaica, and Zimbabwe. These two books offer success stories in improving health and reducing maternal mortality in a range of developing countries. The first book is based on the experiences of Malaysia and Sri Lanka during the past five to six decades. The second book discusses the more recent experiences of Bolivia, China (Yunnan), Egypt, Honduras, Indonesia, Jamaica, and Zimbabwe. These nine countries have made important strides in improving maternal health, and these two books outline what worked and what did not"

Maternal mortality and poverty

MATTHEWS, Zoë
2002

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This publication identifies three components of an effective strategy to reduce maternal mortality rates: a) The existence of an extensive midwifery cadre which is well trained, autonomous, and embedded in the referral system; b) Adequate facilities for institutional deliveries, and c) An implemented strategy to support widespread access to these services. The importance of access to care and services is stressed

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