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UNICEF 2016-2030 Strategy for Health “at a glance”

UNICEF
2016

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This provides an overview of UNICEF’s 2016-2030 Strategy for Health which "aims to: end preventable maternal, newborn, and child deaths; and promote the health and development of all children. With the first goal, UNICEF commits to maintaining focus on the critical unmet needs related to maternal, newborn and under-5 survival. With the second, UNICEF highlights the importance of also looking beyond survival and addressing the health and development needs of older children and adolescents. The Strategy emphasises the importance of prioritising the needs of the most deprived children and promotes multi-sectoral approaches to enhance child development and address underlying causes and determinants of poor health outcomes. It aims to shift UNICEF from vertical disease programmes to strengthening health systems and building resilience, including calling for better integration of humanitarian and development efforts by encouraging risk-informed programming in all contexts"

Malnutrition and disability: unexplored opportunities for collaboration

GROCE, Nora
CHALLENGER, E
BERMAN-BIELER, R
FARKAS, A
YILMAZ, N
SCHUTLINK, W
CLARK, D
KAPLAN, C
KERAC, M
2014

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There is increasing international interest in the links between malnutrition and disability: both are major global public health problems, both are key human rights concerns, and both are currently prominent within the global health agenda. In this review, interactions between the two fields are explored and it is argued that strengthening links would lead to important mutual benefits and synergies. At numerous points throughout the life-cycle, malnutrition can cause or contribute to an individual's physical, sensory, intellectual or mental health disability. By working more closely together, these problems can be transformed into opportunities: nutrition services and programmes for children and adults can act as entry points to address and, in some cases, avoid or mitigate disability; disability programmes can improve nutrition for the children and adults they serve. For this to happen, however, political commitment and resources are needed, as are better data.

Paediatrics and International Child Health
Volume 34, 2014 - Issue 4: Nutrition and malnutrition in low- and middle-income countries
https://doi.org/10.1179/2046905514Y.0000000156

Reducing malaria's impact on child health, development and survival

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO). Roll Back Malaria
2002

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A concise publication on reducing the incidence of malaria among children. It provides some useful background facts on childhood mortality and other consequences such as low birth weight, anaemia, epilepsy, and learning difficulties. It then describes the tools to 'roll back malaria': insecticide-treated bednets, intermittent preventative treatment, antimalarial drug combination therapy, improving access to treatment, and strengthening health infrastructure

World declaration on the survival, protection and development of children and plan of action for implementing the world declaration

UNITED NATIONS (UN)
1990

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This document was adopted during the world summit for children in September 1990. Led by 71 heads of state and government and 88 other senior officials, mostly at the ministerial level, the world summit adopted a declaration on the survival, protection and development of children and a plan of action for implementing the declaration in the 1990s. These documents contain outlined specific promises to promote the "optimal growth and development in childhood through measures to eradicate hunger, malnutrition and famine" and the plans to achieve this goal

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