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UNICEF’S STRATEGY FOR HEALTH (2016-2030) (full version)

UNICEF
2015

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For the five year period 2016-2020, UNICEF’s Strategy for Health sets two overarching goals: 1. End preventable maternal, newborn and child deaths 2. Promote the health and development of all children. To achieve these goals, the Strategy considers the health needs of the child at all life stages. It highlights the need for intensified efforts to address growing inequities in health outcomes, including a particular focus on addressing gender-specific needs and barriers that may determine whether boys and girls are able to reach their full potential in health and well-being. Working together with global and local partners, UNICEF will promote three approaches to contribute to these goals: addressing inequities in health outcomes; strengthening health systems including emergency preparedness, response and resilience; and promoting integrated, multisectoral policies and programmes. The three approaches described underpin a "menu of actions” from which country offices can select, based on their situation analysis, country programme focus, and context. 

Taking critical services to the home : scaling-up home-based maternal and postnatal care, including family planning, through community midwifery in Kenya

MWANGI, Annie
WARREN, Charlotte
2008

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This publication is the report of a project to scale-up a community-based model, in Kenya, that enabled women to give birth safely at home or be referred to a hospital when attended by a self-employed skilled midwife living in the community. The findings of the project were that community midwifery contributed to increasing the proportion of women assisted by skilled attendants during birth in the four districts in which the scheme was trialed, amounting to just under half of all skilled attended births in the districts. Although the skilled birth attendant rate in these districts was well below the national average of 42 percent, there was a steady increase in the proportion of attended deliveries since CMs were introduced in 2005. The districts also reported an increase in postnatal assessments in the first 48 hours and increase in immunization coverage

State of the world’s children 2008 : child survival

United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF)
2008

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This publication provides a wide-ranging assessment of the current state of child survival and primary health care for mothers, newborns and children. It examines lessons learned in child health during the past few decades and outlines the most important emerging precepts and strategies for reducing deaths among children under age five and for providing a continuum of care for mothers, newborns and children

A report card on maternal mortality

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
2008

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‘Progress for Children’ is a series that monitors progress towards the Millennium Development Goals. This edition focuses on maternal health and, in particular, maternal mortality. It considers general progress and then examines particular regions. The report card acknowledges progress in improving maternal health, but argues that it is not sufficient to meet the MDG target of reducing maternal mortality by three quarters between 1990 and 2015

Repositioning postnatal care in a high HIV environment : Swaziland

WARREN, Charlotte
et al
2008

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This report arose from recognition of the need to provide better care and follow up of mothers and infants in the postnatal period in order to improve maternal and neonatal outcomes in Swaziland. The objectives of the study were to determine if changes to the guidelines on postnatal care would result in improvements to provision of of maternal and newborn care in the postnatal period, increase utilization of postnatal care services among all postpartum (PP) women, and improve the care and follow up of HIV-positive postpartum women and their infants. The study confirmed that the introduction of an improved postnatal package with revised timing and content provided key components of maternal, newborn, and HIV care, and increased the utilization of services among postpartum women and their infants. An assessment of the quality of care during client-provider interactions for all postpartum women demonstrated a fourfold increase in the proportion that included all aspects of care: maternal and newborn health, counseling for HIV, family planning, and improved provider-client relationships

Continuum of care for HIV-positive women accessing programs to prevent parent-to-child transmission : findings from India

MAHENDRA, Vaishali S
et al
2007

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This is the report of a diagnostic study in 2005 to provide an evidence base to strengthen the national Indian prevention of parent-to-child transmission (PPTCT) initiative. The key research questions were: What are the treatment, care, and support needs of HIV-positive women and what services do the women utilize to meet their needs? What are the different ways (clinic-based, community-based, etc) to link HIV-positive women and their families with treatment and care services? The study indicated that linkages between PPTCT and HIV care services, as well as PPTCT and reproductive health services, were limited

Achieving the Millennium Development Goal of improving maternal health : determinants, interventions and challenges

LULE, Elizabeth
et al
2005

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"This paper summarizes the importance of improving maternal and reproductive health, the progress made to date and lessons learned, and the major challenges confronting programs today. The paper highlights the progress that some countries, including very poor ones, have made in reducing maternal mortality, but cautions that progress in many countries remains slow. Relying on evidence from the most recent research and survey information, the paper also analyzes the key determinants and evidence on effective interventions for attaining the maternal health MDG. The paper finds that key interventions to improve maternal and reproductive health and reduce maternal mortality include the following mutually reinforcing strategies: (a) mobilizing political commitment and fostering an enabling policy environment; (b) investing in social and economic development such as female education, poverty reduction, and improvements in women’s status; (c) providing family planning services; (d) ensuring quality antenatal care, skilled attendance during childbirth, and availability of emergency obstetric services for pregnancy complications; and (e) strengthening the health system and community involvement. The paper emphasizes that carrying out interventions remains a challenge in environments where political commitment, policies, as well as institutions and health systems, are weak. The paper concludes with guiding lessons from some of the countries that have successfully improved maternal health and with a discussion of some of the difficulties of measuring maternal mortality and morbidity outcomes"

Involving men in maternity care in India

VARKEY, Leila Caleb
FRONTIERS IN REPRODUCTIVE HEALTH PROGRAM
et al
2004

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"The Men in Maternity (MiM) study investigated the feasibility, acceptability and cost of a new, more comprehensive, model of maternity care that encouraged husbands' participation in their wives' antenatal and postpartum care. The study specifically assessed the impact of the intervention on family planning in the postpartum period and STI preventitive practices among men and women. The study was conducted in collaboration with the Employees' State Insurance Corporation (ESIC), Delhi Directorate at their primary health facilities called dispensaries"

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