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The grace of motherhood: disabled women contending with societal denial of intimacy, pregnancy, and motherhood in Ethiopia

TEFERA, Balaynesh
et al
September 2017

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Ethiopian disabled women’s experiences of intimacy, pregnancy and motherhood are reported. Qualitative, in-depth, and semi-structured interviews along with personal observations were used to explore the full experiences of participants. Interview data revealed that mothers experienced significant challenges with regard to accessibility of health centers, physician’s lack of knowledge about and problematic attitudes toward them and more general societal prejudices towards individuals with disability. The 13 participants were employed women with physical or visual disabilities, and the interviewees were from the Addis Ababa metropolitan area, Ethiopia.

 

Disability & Society, 32:10, 1510-1533

DOI: 10.1080/09687599.2017.1361385

“We can also change” Piloting participatory research with persons with disabilities and older people in Bangladesh

BURNS, Danny
OSWALD, Katy
November 2014

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Sightsavers, HelpAge International, ADD International and Alzheimer’s Disease International worked together with the Institute of Development Studies (IDS) to bring the perspectives of those who live in poverty or who are highly marginalised into post-2015 policy making. The aim of the research was to understand better the experiences of social, political and economic exclusion of persons with disabilities and older people in Bangladesh from their own perspectives. Two groups (community and NGO) of peer researchers collected 70 stories from poor and/or excluded persons with disabilities and older people from each of the two sites: Bhashantek, an urban slum in Dhaka; and Cox’s Bazar, a rural area in southeast Bangladesh. From the stories collected and analysed in workshops, the peer researchers identified 13 priority areas that affect persons with disabilities and older people: accidents and disasters; livelihoods; access to education; medical treatment; family support; exclusion and mistreatment; superstition; access to services; mobility; marriage; land; rape and sexual abuse; the role of grassroots community-based organisations. Recommendations from the researchers are made in each area. The peer research programme was evaluated and guidelines for its use are provided.

Community-based rehabilitation : CBR Guidelines|Social component

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
et al
2010

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This component of the CBR Guidelines focuses on social component. It describes "the role of the CBR is to work with all relevant stakeholders to ensure the full participation of people with disabilities in the social life of their families and communities. CBR programmes can provide support and assistance to people with disabilities to enable them to access social opportunities, and can challenge stigma and discrimination to bring about positive social change." The guideline outlines key concepts, and then presents the core concepts, examples and areas of suggested activities in each of the following five elements: Personal Assistance; Relationships, marriage and family; Culture and arts; Recreation, leisure and sport; Justice. This guideline is useful for anyone interested in social component of CBR

Respect, protect and fulfill : legislating for women’s rights in the context of HIV/AIDS

CANADIAN HIV/AIDS LEGAL NETWORK
November 2009

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This two-volume resource contains eight modules draws together international human rights law and illustrative examples from various jurisdictions as the basis for developing a legal framework to respect, protect and fulfill women’s rights in the context of HIV and AIDS. It is intended as a tool to assist human rights advocates and policy-makers as they reform or develop laws to meet the legal challenges posed by the HIV epidemic. It is not intended for any one country. Rather, it is designed to be adaptable to the needs of various countries within sub-Saharan Africa and beyond

Conceptual and practical foundations of gender and human resources for health

NEWMAN, Constance
October 2009

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This paper presents learning about various forms of gender discrimination and how they serve as barriers to health workforce participation, against the backdrop of the global gender and human resources for health (HRH) literature. It points to the central roles played by pregnancy discrimination in weakening women’s ties to the health workforce, and occupational segregation in limiting men’s role in the development of a robust informal HIV and AIDS care-giving workforce. The paper also offers global recommendations for future action through health workforce policy, planning, development and support

The reproductive rights of adolescents : a tool for health and empowerment

CENTER FOR REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS
September 2008

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This briefing paper outlines the general framework of adolescents’ reproductive and sexual rights. It addresses core concerns for adolescents rights and discusses governments’ legal duties to address those concerns. The areas of focus are sexuality education; access to confidential health care; child marriage and lack of educational opportunity; sexual violence; and female genital mutilation. The promotion of adolescent health and autonomy are considered primary goals for advocates and lawmakers

Our future : sexuality and life skills education for young people. Grades 8 - 9

INTERNATIONAL HIV/AIDS ALLIANCE
April 2007

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To help support young people, the Government of Zambia has a comprehensive strategy for sexual and reproductive health and HIV education in and out of school. This is the first in a series of three books which focus on young people of different ages. Each book contains learning activities and illustrations, which engage young people in understanding themselves and their world. They reflect on the virtues and skills needed to develop caring and loving relationships, make good decisions, solve problems and seek help. The topics and activities are designed to fit into the national curriculum or to be used in extra curricula activities in or out of school. The books are accompanied by a Teachers’ Guide

Gendered experiences : marriage and the stigma of leprosy

TRY, Leonie
2006

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Stigma is rife in health and health care and it has implicit impacts which are often overlooked. Due to the continued social construction of the stigma of leprosy, it is clear that a greater understanding is needed of how stigma is experienced. This study considers the experiences of marriage of those who are vulnerable to stigmatisation due to leprosy and more specifically identifies different experiences of leprosy-affected women and men and the possible implications

The changing context of sexual initiation in sub-Saharan Africa

MENSCH, Barbara S
GRANT, Monica J
BLANC, Ann K
November 2005

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During the past 20 years, substantial reductions have occurred in the proportion of young women who report marrying as teenagers in sub-Saharan Africa. An oft-stated consequence of a delay in age at marriage is a rise in the proportion of young women who engage in premarital sex. This paper investigates the links between changing age at marriage and premarital sexual behavior in 27 sub-Saharan African countries in which Demographic and Health Surveys were conducted between 1994 and 2003. Using multiple-decrement life tables to examine the competing risks of premarital sex and marriage without prior sexual experience, we answer the largely unaddressed question of how reductions in the prevalence of early marriage have affected the likelihood of initiating premarital sex. Our analysis reveals that although the age of first sexual activity has either remained the same or increased, a shift in the context of sexual debut from marriage to before marriage has taken place in many countries. We assess whether the increase in the proportion of young women who report premarital sex is influenced by an increase in exposure resulting from delayed marriage or by an increase in the rate of premarital sex. The evidence on this point is mixed; in some settings greater exposure explains more of the increase, whereas in others an increased rate of premarital sex dominates

Trends in the timing of first marriage among men and women in the developing world

MENSCH, Barbara S
SINGH, Susheela
CASTERLINE, John B
August 2005

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The timing of first union merits investigation not only because of the close temporal link between marriage and the onset of childbearing, but also because the age when men and women marry has implications for the organization of family life and for gender relations within society. This paper begins by reviewing the contributions of various social science disciplines to an understanding of the timing of marriage. Using current status data from 73 countries provided by the United Nations Population Division and retrospective data from 52 Demographic and Health Surveys conducted between 1990 and 2001, we then examine recent trends in the timing of first marriage or union for men and women in the developing world. With the exception of South America for both sexes and South and Southeast Asia for men, substantial declines have occurred in the proportion of young men and women who are married. Given the differentials in the timing of marriage by educational attainment and residence, we assess whether the decline in the proportion of young people who are married is related to increases in schooling and urbanization. Expansion of schooling for women has had some impact, but a considerable portion of the reduction in early marriage is not explained by changes in levels of education. We consider other factors that might account for the increase in age at marriage. Finally, we review what is known about the consequences of changing age at marriage with a particular focus on risk of HIV infection.

I'm a teenager : what happened to my rights?

HALFORD, Stuart
et al
November 2004

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This book covers 15 issues affecting the world's young people, such as sexual exploitation, child labour, crime and punishment, HIV and AIDS, and early marriage and motherhood. Chapter 13 deals with issues facing disabled youth including prejudice, abuse and lack of education. The book describes Plan International's work around the world addressing youth issues

Does dowry improve life for brides? A test of the bequest theory of dowry in rural Bangladesh

LUCIANA, Suran
et al
2004

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In recent years, dowry levels have risen to previously unforeseen levels. Among Hindus in north India dowry can amount to three or four times a family's total assets. Among Muslims in Bangladesh and hindus in South India, dowry has become commonplace whereas the practice did not exist a generation ago. The institution of dowry has been widely criticised, socially maligned, and legally banned. Some recent writings suggest that dowry persists because it is 'good for the bride'. This paper explores the association between dowry and the prevalence of domestic abuse to test this bequest theory of dowry. The study finds that, contrary to the bequest theory, married females who paid dowry at marriage have a higher likelihood of reporting domestic violence compared to those who did not. In addition, respondents who paid small dowries report much higher levels of abuse than those who paid large dowries. In fact, paying no dowry is just as protective, if not more so, in terms of preventing abuse as the largest dowry payments

An overview of young people living with disabilities : their needs and their rights

GROCE, Nora Ellen
1999

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This paper discusses findings from the global UNICEF survey on Young People with Disabilities. It presents the global social, demographic and economic issues that young people with disabilities encounter, including social isolation, education, sexuality, and substance abuse. The author argues that very often organisations working with young disabled people focus on job training, but ignore other needs, such as psychosocial support and rehabilitation. Finally, the paper highlights innovative programmes that have successfully reached out to disabled children and young people
This paper may be of interest to anyone generally interested in learning more about youth and disability from an international point of view

Women's reproductive rights in Nigeria : a shadow report

CENTER FOR REPRODUCTIVE LAW AND POLICY (CRLP)
WOMEN'S CENTRE FOR PEACE AND DEVELOPMENT (WOPED)
June 1998

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This report is intended to supplement the report of the government of Nigeria to the Committee on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW). This report focuses particularly on reproductive rights, laws and policies related to reproductive rights, and the realities affecting women's reproductive rights in Nigeria. The report seeks to bring the human rights dimensions of health issues to the attention of bodies monitoring the implementation of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (Women's Convention). The report links various fundamental reproductive rights issues to the relevant provisions of the Women's Convention

Youth infonet

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Youth InfoNet is a one-stop electronic source for new publications and information on youth reproductive health and HIV prevention, presented in two parts: Programme Resources. Summaries of tools, curricula, programme reports, unpublished research findings, and other items that may be useful for youth programming. Most items are available online and links to those are included with the summaries; Research Articles. Summaries of peer-reviewed research papers published in the last month on developing country research
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