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Disability & the Global South (DGS), 2018, Vol. 5 No. 2: Special issue: Intersecting indigeneity, colonisation and disability

2018

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Articles include:

  • Editorial: Intersecting Indigeneity, colonialisation and disability
  • Yuin, Kamilaroi, Sámi, and Maori people’s reflections on experiences as ‘Indigenous scholars’ in ‘Disability Studies’ and ‘Decolonisation’
  • Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology: Practitioners’ Reflections on Indigeneity, Disability and Neo-Colonial Marketing
  • ‘My granddaughter doesn’t know she has disabilities and we are not going to tell her’: Navigating Intersections of Indigenousness, Disability and Gender in Labrador
  • Disabling Bodies of/and Land: Reframing Disability Justice in Conversation with Indigenous Theory and Activism
  • The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its implications for the health and wellbeing of indigenous peoples with disabilities: A comparison across Australia, Mexico and New Zealand
  • Challenges in global Indigenous–Disability comparative research, or, why nation-state political histories matter
  • ‘Black on the inside’: albino subjectivity in the African novel
  • The role of indigenous and external knowledge in development interventions with disabled people in Burkina Faso: the implications of engaging with lived experiences
  • An intersection in population control: welfare reform and indigenous people with a partial capacity to work in the Australian northern territory
  • Inclusion of marginalised Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples with neurocognitive disability in the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)

 

‘Black on the inside’: albino subjectivity in the African novel

LIPENGA, Ken Junior
NGMIRA, Emmanuel
2018

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The last decade has seen increased attention to the treatment of people with albinism in several African countries, particularly the peril they find themselves in due to stigma and superstition. As a way of countering these misconceptions, there has been educative activism from legal, medical as well as religious perspectives. In this paper, we draw upon a different discourse- literary representation- arguing that in selected African novels, the authors employ a variety of strategies that counter harmful stereotypes about albinism, and in the process act as literary interventions that enable an appreciation of the person behind the skin condition. Drawing from insights in Literary Disability Studies, the discussion examines the representation of albinism in four African novels: Petina Gappah’s The Book of Memory (2015), Meg Vandermerwe’s Zebra Crossing (2013), Unathi Magubeni’s Nwelezelanga: The Star Child (2016), and Jenny Robson’s Because Pula Means Rain (2000), and highlights the way albinism is presented as bodily condition that intersects with other experiences on the continent, including indigenous epistemologies, gender, sexuality and family relationships. 

 

Disability and the Global South, 2018, Vol.5, No. 2, 1472-1487

Who is being left behind in sub-Saharan Africa, Asia and Latin America? 3 reports from ODI

LYNCH, Alainna
BERLINER, Tom
MAROTTI, Chiara
BHAKTAL Tanvi
RODRIGUEZ TAKEUCHI Laura
et al
February 2016

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The commitment to ‘leave no one behind’ has been a key feature of all the discussions on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Here are three papers setting out the first step to implementing this agenda - the step of identifying marginalised communities. The focus is on two case study countries for each of the three regions, sub-Saharan Africa, Asia, and Latin America and the papers identify gaps in achieving a number of outcomes relating to key SDGs targets for marginalised groups. The paper on Asia highlights people with disabilities in Bangladesh.

Nairobi declaration : inclusive post-2015 development agenda for persons with disabilities in Africa

INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY ALLIANCE (IDA)
et al
March 2014

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The Nairobi declaration calls for a more inclusive post-2015 agenda with a specific demand that development agenda targets and indicators explicitly include persons with disabilities. This document succinctly summarises the issues faced by persons with disabilities in Africa and their specific demands to enable greater inclusion in the post-2015 development agenda. It was adopted by persons with disabilities from Africa, representatives of national, sub-regional and Pan-African disabled people’s organisations, on the 8th of March during the Nairobi conference “Inclusive post 2015 development agenda and UN CRPD in Africa”, organised by the International Disability Alliance in partnership with the International Disability and Development Consortium, UNICEF and the UN Partnership to promote the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

“Inclusive post 2015 development agenda and UN CRPD in Africa”

8 March 2014

Nairobi, Kenya

Disability, poverty, and livelihoods guide : guidance from Trickle Up

SANSON, Jo
FELIX, Michael
November 2013

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"This guide is intended to encourage and assist organizations seeking to include people with disabilities in their economic strengthening and livelihood programs. It contains lessons for organizations that aim to move households out of poverty, [and] those that seek to economically and socially empower particularly vulnerable members of poor household"

Sustainable development in an ageing world : a call to UN member states on the development agenda beyond 2015

HELPAGE INTERNATIONAL
AARP OFFICE OF INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION ON AGING
September 2013

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This paper responds to UN discourse and highlights that the post-2015 development framework should be inclusive of older people along with others and address the rights and needs of people of all ages. It provides recommendations to the UN Member States with regard to ageing and the post 2015 agenda

Old age, disability and mental health : data issues for a post-2015 framework

SAMMAN, Emma
RODRIGUEZ-TAKEUCHI, L. K
May 2013

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"This Background Note focuses on inequalities associated with old age, disability and mental health. It argues that these should be considered salient sources of group-based difference, given the numbers of people affected, their marginalisation and vulnerability, and their relative neglect in international agreements to date. This note identifies a lack of data as a particular concern, but one that can be addressed through revisions to standard household surveys. To this end, the paper discusses the available data and their limitations, constraints to better data collection and efforts needed to adjust key international survey instruments -the World Bank’s Core Welfare Indicator Questionnaire (CWIQ) and Living Standards and Measurement Survey (LSMS), Macro International’s Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) and the UNICEF Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS)- to collect reliable data on these issues. It sets out technical adjustments that would enable these surveys to broaden their coverage, collect richer information and improve their identification of these three groups. It concludes by commenting on how measures to address the inequalities that affect these groups could be incorporated within a new post-2015 framework agreement"
ODI Background note

Disability and the millennium development goals : a review of the MDG process and strategies for inclusion of disability issues in millennium development goal efforts

GROCE, Nora
2011

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This report provides an overview "for why and how disability can and should be included in the planning, monitoring and evaluation of MDG related programmes and policies." This report is useful to people working in disability advocacy, programming and outreach efforts, as well as people those working on MDG-related efforts

Leadership for social inclusion in the lives of persons with disabilities

SHERWIN, Jane
September 2010

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"This article identifies five challenges for those in leadership roles: developing a deep sense of what the concept ‘social inclusion’ really means; confronting the values questions; developing consciousness of what the community is taught through the actions of services; transforming the role of services and workers; and the use of theory-based knowledge. The article also explores the attributes of those in leadership roles, so that they are more equipped to respond to these challenges: ethical and moral leadership; a combination of conceptual clarity, insight, knowledge and wisdom; authentic relationships with people with disabilities and family members; an appreciation of history; and a faith and efforts in things that are likely to bring dividends"
The International Journal of Leadership in Public Services , Vol 6 supplement

Mental health and development : targeting people with mental health conditions as a vulnerable group

FUNK, Michelle
et al
2010

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"This report on mental health and development is a call to action to all development stakeholders - governments, civil society, multilateral agencies, bilateral agencies, global partnerships, private foundations, academic and research institutions - to focus their attention on mental health
The report presents compelling evidence that persons with mental and psychosocial disabilities are a vulnerable group but continue to be marginalized in terms of development aid and government attention. It makes the case for reaching out to this group through the design and implementation of appropriate policies and programmes and through the inclusion of mental health interventions into broader poverty reduction and development strategies. The report also describes a number of key interventions which can provide a starting point for these efforts. By investing in persons with mental and psychosocial disabilities, development outcomes can be improved"

Psychosocial counselling and social work with clients and their families in the Somali context : a facilitator’s guide

OFFICE OF THE HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS (UNHCR)
November 2009

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This handbook is "designed to be used as training support handbook for helping professionals in the Somali context. The focus is on psychosocial needs for the rehabilitation of persons with trauma, mental health related forms of distress and those who have experienced gender based violence and gender related abuses. The guidelines, developed within a UNHCR funded programme in Somalia, are intended to assist staffs, who are concerned with providing protection and assistance to refugees and IDP"

Counting the invisible : understanding the lives of people with disabilities in Pakistan

SINGAL, Nidhi
BHATTI, Feyza
MAILK, Rabea
2009

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This paper discusses "the conceptual underpinnings and findings of a household survey conducted in two regions of Pakistan which attempted to address some of these gaps in existing knowledge....The findings of this survey emphasize the continued marginalization of young people with disabilities in the areas of education, employment and marriage prospects. Additionally, reflections on the research process highlight the many challenges entailed in undertaking research on disability issues"
RECOUP Working Paper No 23

Older people in emergencies : considerations for action and policy development

HUTTON, David
2008

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This analysis highlights factors that particularly affect older people in emergencies, especially health-related concerns. It also proposes a strategy to raise awareness about older people in emergencies, and recommends policies and practices to address these considerations. It sets out objectives for the three phases of an emergency response: the preparedness phase; the emergency response and operations phase; and the recovery and transition phase

At the heart of change : the role of communication in sustainable development

WILSON, Mark
WARNOCK, Kitty
SCHOEMAKER, Emrys
2007

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This paper shows how information, communication, the media and ICTs are powerful agents of change, how they can give 'voice' to the poor and contribute to more sustainable development, but it also emphasises the need to support and strengthen communication processes used by poor and marginalised people who already face many barriers to receiving information, and to develop the skills and capacity of those people to make their own voices heard. It concludes by suggesting an agenda for action by policy makers, development experts, international organisations, non-governmental organisations and the private sector (including the media)

Non-formal education and livelihood skills for marginalized street and slum youth in Uganda

UGANDA YOUTH DEVELOPMENT LINK (UYDEL)
June 2006

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This report summarises a programme for marginalised youth that was implemented in one urban area (Kampala) and one rural area (Arua) of Uganda, with the ultimate goal of determining marketable livelihood skills while facilitating placement of marginalised youth in employment. By providing marginalised youth with new learning opportunities that nurture empowerment and socio-economic inclusion, the project contributed to breaking the cycle of marginalisation and vulnerabilities that impedes the development of out-of-schools youth. In this context, education on HIV and AIDS was an integral part of the project, which also involved the active participation of local artisans and employers during specific training and orientation sessions. 288 marginalised youth were placed in viable working situations. The process was effective in building self-esteem, equipping them to make informed decisions and resist negative peer pressure. Training methods revolved around three basic approaches: - learning by doing; - learning by producing, and - learning by earning

HIV/AIDS and individuals with disability

GROCE, Nora Ellen
2005

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This article looks at the impact of HIV on people living with permanent physical, sensory, intellectual, or mental health disability. In particular, it considers whether AIDS messages reach disabled populations and the inequity of access to health care that they face

Working where the risks are : drug abuse prevention programme in Asia for marginalised youth

2002

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The programme uses non-formal education to reach vulnerable young people who are at risk of drug misuse and HIV, mainly in India, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Laos and Cambodia, but also in Pakistan, Malaysia and Nepal. These youth often live in marginalised settings, e.g. slum dwellers, street children, or certain low caste communities. The programme also raises awareness among the broader community about drug mis-use and harm prevention activities, and develop policy with organisations and professionals, from grassroots level to regional government

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