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Developing intervention strategies to improve community health worker motivation and performance

FRANK, Tine
KALLANDER, Karin
2012

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"This 28-page learning paper describes Malaria Consortium’s experience with Integrated Community Case Management (ICCM) in malaria prevention and treatment in Mozambique and Uganda. ICCM is an approach where community-based health workers are trained to identify, treat, and refer complex cases malaria (and other diseases) in children"
The Learning Series Papers

Malaria treatment in Nigeria : the role of patent medicine vendors

OLADEPO, Oladimeji
et al
March 2009

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"This scoping study provides a quick assessment of the malaria treatment markets and the role played by patent medicine vendors in Nigeria, and offers ways to improve the regulation and provision of anti-malarial drugs. It documented the sources of drugs in the three states and people’s problems in getting access to appropriate treatment for malaria"

Achieving millennium development goals (4, 5 &6) in Africa south of Sahara : BCH Africa's strategic vision

Building Capacities for Better Health in Africa (BCH Africa)
2007

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This is document outlines BCH-Africa's strategic vision to help countries in sub-Saharan Africa to meet three of the millennium goals by 2015. These goals are: to help to reduce child mortality; improve maternal health; and combat HIV and AIDS, malaria and other diseases. The strategy sets out four main areas of focus: promoting social ownership of immunisation, to contribute to a rapid reduction in infant and maternal mortality; promoting national partnership and developing community skills to roll back malaria in Africa sustainably; developing individual and community skills to stop the spread of HIV and AIDS and tuberculosis; and using communication approaches that achieve long-lasting social changes to help control HIV, malaria and tuberculosis and resolve other health problems. Accompanying strategic priorities are: integrating health communication interventions; and building human resource capacity in community health promotion with a firm commitment to involving all the main actors and partners to create greater social ownership and sustainability

Malaria and children : progress in intervention coverage

WHITE JOHANSSON, Emily
et al
2007

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This report assesses progress in malaria control and analyses how well countries are making available key interventions that reduce the malaria burden. A particular emphasis is progress across sub-Saharan Africa - whose countries face the greatest malaria burden

An online operational rainfall-monitoring resource for epidemic malaria early warning systems in Africa

GROVER-KOPEC, E
et al
2005

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Malaria Early Warning Systems are advocated as a means of improving the opportunity for preparedness and timely response to malaria epidemics. Rainfall is one of the major factors triggering epidemics in warm semi-arid and desert-fringe areas. Consequently, rainfall monitoring forms one of the essential elements for the development of integrated Malaria Early Warning Systems for sub-Saharan Africa, as outlined by the World Health Organization. The Roll Back Malaria Technical Resource Network on Prevention and Control of Epidemics recommended that a simple indicator of changes in epidemic risk in regions of marginal transmission, consisting primarily of rainfall anomaly maps, could provide immediate benefit to early warning efforts. In response to these recommendations, the Famine Early Warning Systems Network produced maps that combine information about dekadal rainfall anomalies, and epidemic malaria risk, available via their Africa Data Dissemination Service. These maps were later made available in a format that is directly compatible with HealthMapper, the mapping and surveillance software developed by the WHO's Communicable Disease Surveillance and Response Department. A new monitoring interface has recently been developed at the International Research Institute for Climate Prediction (IRI) that enables the user to gain a more contextual perspective of the current rainfall estimates by comparing them to previous seasons and climatological averages. These resources are available at no cost to the user and are updated on a routine basis

Child survival in sub-Saharan Africa : taking stock

SUPPORT FOR ANALYSIS AND RESEARCH IN AFRICA (SARA) PROJECT
2005

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This paper presents the findings and recommendations of research, funded by USAID, to understand better the growing gap between Africa and the rest of the world in achieving the UN Millennium Development Goals that relate to child health. It aims to provide an analysis of child health trends in order to identify how USAID could improve its contribution to improving child health in Africa

Mapping malaria risk in Africa

MAPPING MALARIA RISK IN AFRICA / ATLAS DU RISKE DE LA MALARIA EN AFRIQUE (MARA/ARMA)
December 2004

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This site presents maps of malaria risk and endemicity (the presence of malaria) in Africa, drawing on published and unpublished data, and through spatial modelling of malaria distribution, seasonality and endemicity. Many factors, especially endemicity, affect the choice of control methods. In the absence of such data it is impossible to rationalize the allocation of limited resources for malaria control. This site presents an opportunity to rethink endemicity and how we may map malaria risk in order to better support planning and programming of malaria control

Participation of African social scientists in malaria control : identifying enabling and constraining factors

NGALAME, Paulyne M
et al
December 2004

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This article discusses research examining the enabling and constraining factors that influence African social scientists' involvement in malaria control. Findings showed that most participants did not necessarily seek malaria as a career path. Having a mentor who provided research and training opportunities, and developing strong technical skills in malaria control and grant or proposal writing facilitated career opportunities in malaria. A paucity of jobs and funding and inadequate technical skills in malaria limited the type and number of opportunities available to social scientists in malaria control. Understanding the factors that influence job satisfaction, recruitment and retention in malaria control is necessary for better integration of social scientists into malaria control. However, given the wide array of skills that social scientists have and the variety of deadly diseases competing for attention in sub-Saharan Africa, it might be more cost effective to employ social scientists to work broadly on issues common to communicable diseases in general rather than solely on malaria

Gender mainstreaming in health : the possibilities and constraints of involving district-level field workers

DUNN, Alison
2004

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This policy brief concerns the involvement of district-level workers in local-level practical approaches to mainstreaming gender. This involvement is central to facilitating change and informing health strategies. MKP led a project in Ghana to facilitate district-level health management teams and district-level field workers to conduct qualitative and participatory research on gender aspects of access to health care for malaria. The results have informed strategies to improve gender equity in health at the community level

Communication in participatory approaches to health care

DUNN, Alison
2004

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This policy brief is concerned with the involvement of district-level health workers in participatory approaches at community level. Using participatory approaches improves healthworkers' communication skills and validates community knowledge. This emerged from a study carried out by the Malaria Knowledge Programme (MKP) in Ghana where it was clear that the interaction and communication that took place between health workers and community members provided opportunities for dialogue and building new relationships

Improving the quality of malaria diagnosis and laboratory services in resource-poor countries

DUNN, Alison
2004

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This policy brief is concerned with improving laboratory services and promoting accurate diagnosis of malaria at community level. Such measures would both save lives and prevent wastage of valuable resources. Increasing levels of resistance to cheap, first-line antimalarials means that many poor countries must promote new, more expensive treatment in the form of Artemisinin-based Combination Therapies (ACTs). The need for improved diagnostic tools that can be used at community level has never been greater. Since 1999, the Malaria Knowledge Programme (MKP) has been working in Malawi and Ghana to increase the effectiveness of laboratory systems and diagnostics for malaria and other common health problems

RBM communications assessment : challenges and opportunities in Ghana, Mali, Senegal, Tanzania and Uganda

SHUFFELL, Sara
2004

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This report is from an assessment carried out between October 2002 and April 2003 in Ghana, Mali, Senegal, Tanzania and Uganda. It was part of a Roll Back Malaria Communications Assessment as an initial stage in the process to develop effective and inclusive national malaria communication strategies in RBM participating countries across Africa. It notes the challenges that are raised in the context of development communications in Africa: the absence of basic malaria communications strategies, poor visibility of National Malaria Control Programmes, and lack of regional coordination and information sharing to name a few. There are, however, many opportunities to develop better malaria communications listed in the report

Malaria control in schools : protecting children and teachers, protecting the next generation

SOUTHERN AFRICA MALARIA CONTROL (SAMC)
2004

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This short paper is aimed at schools, teachers, and pupils. It considers the problem of malaria in schools in southern Africa, how malaria and education are linked and strategies for malaria control in schools. There is a list of tools for schools that want to engage with the problem of malaria, and also a list of partners such as national malaria control programmes, ministries, UN agencies and NGOs that can provide support to school based malaria control. Steps for schools to take are suggested, along with malaria materials that are currently available for southern African schools

Enhancing research uptake through communication, networking and capacity development

DUNN, Alison
2004

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This brief paper describes the research methodology employed by the Malaria Knowledge Programme, and key lessons learned. The programme aimed to enhance the impact of its work through strengthening information and communication flows, involving Southern researchers and institutions and creating international networks for the improvement of research communication throughout its work. Using examples, this paper illustrates how the programme engaged with dynamics of research, policy making and practice, in accordance with DFID recommendations

Liverpool school of tropical medicine : Malaria knowledge programme. Annual report 2003-2004 : reduction in the suffering by improving the management of malaria through better intervention and control of malaria.’

LIVERPOOL SCHOOL OF TROPICAL MEDICINE (LSTM)
2004

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The report shows the overall activities of the Malaria Knowledge Programme during 2003-2004. It initially outlines the research activities and the new knowledge outputs. Using a framework developed by Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine's Vulnerability and Health Alliance the report contains an evaluation of the implications and effects of the research findings on those most vulnerable to the effects of malaria

Malaria over-diagnosis in Africa

HEALTHLINK WORLDWIDE
2004

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'In Africa, 70 per cent of fever cases in children are diagnosed in the home and treated with traditional remedies or drugs bought from local shops. These fevers are presumed to be due to malaria, but comparison of accurately diagnosed cases of malaria with presumed cases of malaria reveal shockingly high rates of over-diagnosis'

Placental malaria increases mother to child HIV transmission

BRAHMBHATT, Heena
November 2003

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This news release from John Hopkins University contains reports that that placental malaria infection during pregnancy scientifically increases the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV. The study, funded by John Hopkins University, was carried out in Uganda where 40% of HIV positive women with placental malaria had HIV positive babies, compared to 15.4% of HIV positive women without malaria. Interventions to prevent malaria during pregnancy could potentially reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV

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