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Quality rehabilitation for all. Lessons learnt from integrating rehabilitation services in two general hospitals in Bangladesh

BAART, Judith
RAHMAN, Nafeesur
November 2017

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Working from the theory that integrating basic rehabilitation care within the health care system in Bangladesh, rather than as a stand-alone service, could greatly improve awareness of and access to rehabilitation services, CDD piloted setting up therapeutic care centres within hospitals. This report presents the lessons learned.

The right to live independently and be included in the community : Addressing barriers to independent living across the globe

ANGLELOVA-MLADENOVA, Lilia
June 2017

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This reports looks at the main barriers to the realisation of disabled people’s right to live independently and be included in the community, which is set out in Article 19 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). They are grouped in seven broad areas: (1) misunderstanding and misuse of key terms, (2) negative attitudes and stigma, (3) lack of support for families, (4) prevalence of institutional services, (5) barriers related to community support services, (6) barriers in mainstream services and facilities, and (7) barriers, concerning other CRPD provisions, with effect on Article 19. A set of recommendations is also provided, outlining measures required to address these barriers.

The recommendations in this report – presented below - were shared with the UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities when they were drafting the General Comment on Article 19. They can be used by governments and civil society organisations, alongside the General Comment, to identify actions needed to implement Article 191 CRPD.

 

Protection mainstreaming toolkit field - testing version

GLOBAL PROTECTION CLUSTER
2017

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The Global Protection Cluster (GPC) Protection Mainstreaming Toolkit is designed as a companion to the GPC Protection Mainstreaming Training Package.The Training Package is the starting point to understand the concept and principles of “protection mainstreaming”. The Toolkit is designed to practically assist humanitarian workers to mainstream protection at the individual programme or project level as well as at the collective strategic and coordination level. The Toolkit targets coordination structures (e.g. Clusters, Inter-Cluster Coordination Groups, and Humanitarian Country Teams) and donors by providing the tools and necessary advice to mainstream protection into their strategies and throughout the Humanitarian Programme Cycle (HPC). It also targets operational organisations (e.g. UN, INGOs and NNGOs), with the tools to mainstream protection into their organisational procedures and programmes. Finally, the Toolkit allows humanitarian workers to monitor and evaluate the process and the impact of having mainstreamed protection on the affected population.

Disability framework : one year on : leaving no one behind

DEPARTMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (DFID)
December 2015

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“The DFID vision is a world where no one is left behind. A world where people with disabilities have a voice, choice and control over the decisions that affect them. Where they participate in and benefit equitably from everyday life, everywhere. Our first Disability Framework was launched in December 2014. It focused on inspiring their colleagues to do more, with support from civil society partners…This updated Framework reflects lessons they have learned over the past year and outlines the next steps we will take as an organisation to deliver their vision”

Disability inclusion : topic guide

ROHWERDER, Brigitte
November 2015

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This topic guide summarises evidence on the key debates and challenges of disability inclusion in development and humanitarian response. Disability does not necessary imply limited wellbeing and poverty. Yet there is growing evidence that the estimated one billion people with disabilities face attitudinal, physical and institutional barriers that result in multi-dimensional poverty, exclusion and marginalisation. Disability inclusion could increase earnings, tax revenues, and individual and societal wellbeing. It need not be costly or complicated. Inclusive approaches are more cost-effective than piecemeal disability interventions. GSDRC Topic Guides aim to provide a clear, concise and objective report on findings from rigorous research on critical areas of development policy. Their purpose is to inform policymakers and practitioners of the key debates and evidence on the topic of focus, to support informed decision-making

Available in both pdf and online versions

Disability and development GSDRC professional development

COBLEY, David
October 2015

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The reading pack highlights the importance of mainstreaming disability as a cross-cutting issue. Progress has been made since the post-2015 development framework especially in the legislation and in politics. However, in order to go further, “society itself needs to be radically reshaped (…) By mainstreaming disability into all areas of development assistance, general poverty and exclusion issues can be addressed in a way that does not leave out disabled people”

 

Disability and Development. GSDRC Professional Development Reading Pack no. 23

Sightsavers empowerment and inclusion : strategic framework 2015

SIGHTSAVERS
September 2015

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This document is the Sightsavers’ inclusion strategic framework 2015. It explains their rights-based approach of mainstreaming disability inclusion throughout their health programmes and their operations regarding education, organisational diversity and equal rights. It also shows their strategy focusing on the empowerment of people with disabilities in electoral process and in the financial sector

Practice note : collecting and using data on disability to inform inclusive development

BUSH, Asahel
CARROLL, Aleisha
JAMES, Kathryn
July 2015

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This Practice Note provides guidance and tools for the collection and use of data and evidence on disability at a program level, to inform inclusive development practice and outcomes. It includes sections on why to collect information about disability; how to make mainstream data collection processes disability inclusive; planning for data collection throughout the project cycle; and methods and tools for collection of data to support disability inclusion

The document is the result of a collaboration between Plan International and the CBM Australia-Nossal Institute Partnership for Disability Inclusive Development. It was prepared in the context of growing interest among international development agencies in the disability inclusive practice, and the collection of evidence to underpin this. It draws on some of the experiences and learning arising from Plan’s work to strengthen disability inclusion within its development programs and the CBM-Nossal Partnership’s work to strengthen disability inclusion within the Australian development sector

Development for all 2015-2020 : strategy for strengthening disability-inclusive development in Australia’s aid program

AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND TRADE (DFAT)
May 2015

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The objective of Australia’s work in disability-inclusive development is to improve the quality of life of people with disabilities in developing countries by enhancing participation and empowerment of people with disabilities, reducing poverty among people with disabilities and improving equality for people with disabilities in all areas of public life. This strategy document “provides guidance for DFAT’s strategic decision making by articulating key opportunities for strengthening disability-inclusive development where DFAT can make the most difference—addressing the key challenges of disability-inclusive development in the Indo-Pacific, using Australia’s expertise, and aligning our efforts with the priorities of Australia’s aid program. For external stakeholders, this strategy is a non-binding public articulation of the Australian Government’s continued commitment to disability-inclusive development and highlights our approach, principles and priorities”

 

Mainstreaming persons with disabilities into disaster risk reduction

VERMA, Colonel N. M.
KADAM, Smita
March 2015

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This case study presents Saritsa Foundations work in India. Saritsa Foundation has been organizing capacity building workshops for persons living with disabilities since June 2000, in rural and urban areas in nine states of India. About 10,050 persons living with disabilities have been given opportunities to develop skills to respond to disasters and protect themselves

The World Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction (WCDRR), HFA Case Study
 

Inclusive education video catalogue : using videos effectively

HAUSCHILD, Alexander
LEWIS, Ingrid
2015

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This Inclusive education video guide is facilitators who already have some experience of organising and facilitating sessions, but who would like some additional advice on using videos effectively as a training or advocacy tool,  such as those working for NGOs, community workers, and teachers

Fair’n square : a fair and equal world for all children

UNICEF
HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
2015

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This website presents information about a joint UNICEF-Handicap International programme on child disability in two cities of Mozambique, Maputo and Matola. The focus of the project was to first identify children with disabilities and then ensure that these children could access services. The website features a useful video and practical case studies

The Telengana disability study : summary report

INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR EVIDENCE IN DISABILITY (ICED)
December 2014

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This report presents a summary of the findings of a study that developed and tested a best-practice population-based survey methodology to estimate the prevalence of disability in children and adults in India, and compared the extent to which people with and without disabilities access key mainstream services and opportunities including health, education and livelihoods in Telengana State, India

The north west Cameroon disability study

INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR EVIDENCE IN DISABILITY (ICED)
December 2014

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This report presents the findings of a study that developed and tested a best-practice population-based survey methodology to estimate the prevalence of disability in children and adults in Cameroon, and compared the extent to which people with and without disabilities access key mainstream services and opportunities including health, education and livelihoods in north west Cameroon

The north west Cameroon disability study : summary report

INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR EVIDENCE IN DISABILITY (ICED)
December 2014

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This report presents a summary of the findings of a study that developed and tested a best-practice population-based survey methodology to estimate the prevalence of disability in children and adults in Cameroon, and compared the extent to which people with and without disabilities access key mainstream services and opportunities including health, education and livelihoods in north west Cameroon

Building the evidence base in disability : research summary

INTERNATIONAL CENTRE FOR EVIDENCE IN DISABILITY (ICED)
December 2014

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This research summary of presents the aims, methods and key findings from two disability studies in Cameroon and India. The studies developed a comprehensive population-based survey methodology that is compatible with the International Classification of Functioning (ICF), and explored the inter-relationship between the components of this framework

Inclusion works : lessons learned on the inclusion of people with disabilities in a food security project for ultra poor women in Bangladesh

BRUIJN, Paulien
May 2014

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People with disabilities are often amongst the poorest in the developing world, and yet they are usually left out of development projects. Inclusion of persons with disabilities in mainstream development programmes is a relatively new concept in development. The ICCO Gaibandha Food Security Project in Bangladesh is one of the first programmes that has mainstreamed disability on a large scale. This book represents the lessons that are learned about mainstreaming disability in this programme. It is a source of inspiration and offers practical suggestions to make a start with including people with disabilities in (food security) projects

Including orphans and vulnerable children with disabilities in early childhood development programs : technical brief

LEVY, Marcy
MESSNER, Lyn
WERTLIEB, Donald
January 2014

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“This technical brief presents information and guidance on implementing early childhood development (ECD) programmes for young orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) with disabilities and their families. It provides a basic overview of the fundamental elements a program manager should consider to integrate disability positively into ECD programmes and address specific disabilities individually, as needed. This technical brief describes “twin-track” and “triple-track” approaches that promote participation, attention to specific needs, and equal access for OVC with disabilities and their families. It also lists six critical elements for HIV programmes seeking to address the needs of children with disabilities”

Accessibility and development : mainstreaming disability in the post-2015 development agenda

UN DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL AFFAIRS (DESA)
December 2013

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The publication reviews the concept of accessibility and its role in achieving inclusive and sustainable development. It propositions that accessibility be, not only a means and a goal of inclusive development, but also an enabler of an improved, participative economic and social environment for all members of society, including persons with disabilities.

Three key issues are addressed in the publication: (1) Accessibility in the context of human rights and development; (2) accessibility in policy and practice; and (3) accessibility and a disability-inclusive post-2015 development agenda.

The publication reviews good practices and lessons learned from both top-down and bottom-up approaches in promoting accessibility in practices and provides a response to the question: “How does accessibility relate to inclusive, sustainable and equitable development?” The publication argues that accessibility must be re-conceptualized as an enabler: a precondition for any progress toward development for all members of society.  It concludes that the full and effective participation of persons with disabilities in decision-making processes would contribute directly to the successful adoption of an inclusive post-2015 development agenda

ST/ESA/350

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