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The right to live independently and be included in the community : Addressing barriers to independent living across the globe

ANGLELOVA-MLADENOVA, Lilia
June 2017

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This reports looks at the main barriers to the realisation of disabled people’s right to live independently and be included in the community, which is set out in Article 19 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD). They are grouped in seven broad areas: (1) misunderstanding and misuse of key terms, (2) negative attitudes and stigma, (3) lack of support for families, (4) prevalence of institutional services, (5) barriers related to community support services, (6) barriers in mainstream services and facilities, and (7) barriers, concerning other CRPD provisions, with effect on Article 19. A set of recommendations is also provided, outlining measures required to address these barriers.

The recommendations in this report – presented below - were shared with the UN Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities when they were drafting the General Comment on Article 19. They can be used by governments and civil society organisations, alongside the General Comment, to identify actions needed to implement Article 191 CRPD.

 

Disability framework : one year on : leaving no one behind

DEPARTMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (DFID)
December 2015

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“The DFID vision is a world where no one is left behind. A world where people with disabilities have a voice, choice and control over the decisions that affect them. Where they participate in and benefit equitably from everyday life, everywhere. Our first Disability Framework was launched in December 2014. It focused on inspiring their colleagues to do more, with support from civil society partners…This updated Framework reflects lessons they have learned over the past year and outlines the next steps we will take as an organisation to deliver their vision”

Disability inclusion : topic guide

ROHWERDER, Brigitte
November 2015

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This topic guide summarises evidence on the key debates and challenges of disability inclusion in development and humanitarian response. Disability does not necessary imply limited wellbeing and poverty. Yet there is growing evidence that the estimated one billion people with disabilities face attitudinal, physical and institutional barriers that result in multi-dimensional poverty, exclusion and marginalisation. Disability inclusion could increase earnings, tax revenues, and individual and societal wellbeing. It need not be costly or complicated. Inclusive approaches are more cost-effective than piecemeal disability interventions. GSDRC Topic Guides aim to provide a clear, concise and objective report on findings from rigorous research on critical areas of development policy. Their purpose is to inform policymakers and practitioners of the key debates and evidence on the topic of focus, to support informed decision-making

Available in both pdf and online versions

Access to HIV and AIDS care: persons with disabilities still left behind

MAC-SEING, Muriel
October 2015

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This article presents disability-inclusive good practices, policy and program related opportunities. It highlights a series of facts and figures related to people with disabilities and HIV infection and the interaction between HIV and disability.  The article goes on to outline Handicap International’s proposal to “remove HIV-related barriers for persons with disabilities” in a two-track approach that includes decision makers, service providers, and service users. Finally, the article shares discussions of successful inclusive practices involving HIV and persons with disabilities in various communities around the world and the key challenges and opportunities to include disability into HIV and AIDS

Sightsavers empowerment and inclusion : strategic framework 2015

SIGHTSAVERS
September 2015

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This document is the Sightsavers’ inclusion strategic framework 2015. It explains their rights-based approach of mainstreaming disability inclusion throughout their health programmes and their operations regarding education, organisational diversity and equal rights. It also shows their strategy focusing on the empowerment of people with disabilities in electoral process and in the financial sector

Practice note : collecting and using data on disability to inform inclusive development

BUSH, Asahel
CARROLL, Aleisha
JAMES, Kathryn
July 2015

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This Practice Note provides guidance and tools for the collection and use of data and evidence on disability at a program level, to inform inclusive development practice and outcomes. It includes sections on why to collect information about disability; how to make mainstream data collection processes disability inclusive; planning for data collection throughout the project cycle; and methods and tools for collection of data to support disability inclusion

The document is the result of a collaboration between Plan International and the CBM Australia-Nossal Institute Partnership for Disability Inclusive Development. It was prepared in the context of growing interest among international development agencies in the disability inclusive practice, and the collection of evidence to underpin this. It draws on some of the experiences and learning arising from Plan’s work to strengthen disability inclusion within its development programs and the CBM-Nossal Partnership’s work to strengthen disability inclusion within the Australian development sector

Disability in humanitarian context : views from affected people and field organisations

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
July 2015

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This report is based on the results of a global consultation carried out in 2015 as a contribution to the World Humanitarian Summit and is intended to better identify the changes needed for a disability inclusive humanitarian response. A total of 769 responses were collected through 3 online surveys targeting persons with disabilities, disabled people's organisations (DPOs) and humanitarian actors. The results demonstrate that while most humanitarian actors pledge to target vulnerable persons in crisis time, few of them are putting in place specific mechanisms and procedures to effectively reach to, and taking into account, persons with disabilities in their programmes. Addressing these challenges is a human right imperative and has also to do with an effective implementation of principled humanitarian aid. This ambition requires changes in policies and practices within the humanitarian community as a whole

Development for all 2015-2020 : strategy for strengthening disability-inclusive development in Australia’s aid program

AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND TRADE (DFAT)
May 2015

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The objective of Australia’s work in disability-inclusive development is to improve the quality of life of people with disabilities in developing countries by enhancing participation and empowerment of people with disabilities, reducing poverty among people with disabilities and improving equality for people with disabilities in all areas of public life. This strategy document “provides guidance for DFAT’s strategic decision making by articulating key opportunities for strengthening disability-inclusive development where DFAT can make the most difference—addressing the key challenges of disability-inclusive development in the Indo-Pacific, using Australia’s expertise, and aligning our efforts with the priorities of Australia’s aid program. For external stakeholders, this strategy is a non-binding public articulation of the Australian Government’s continued commitment to disability-inclusive development and highlights our approach, principles and priorities”

 

Inclusive education video catalogue : using videos effectively

HAUSCHILD, Alexander
LEWIS, Ingrid
2015

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This Inclusive education video guide is facilitators who already have some experience of organising and facilitating sessions, but who would like some additional advice on using videos effectively as a training or advocacy tool,  such as those working for NGOs, community workers, and teachers

Fair’n square : a fair and equal world for all children

UNICEF
HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
2015

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This website presents information about a joint UNICEF-Handicap International programme on child disability in two cities of Mozambique, Maputo and Matola. The focus of the project was to first identify children with disabilities and then ensure that these children could access services. The website features a useful video and practical case studies

Including disability in HIV policy and programming : good practices drawn from country-based evidence

MAC-SEING, Muriel
December 2014

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The purpose of this document is to share good practices and processes concerning the inclusion of disability issues in HIV policy and programming, drawing on specific experiences in Senegal, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda and Cambodia and on lessons learned at international AIDS conferences. More specifically, it is intended to 1) provide a clear indication to HIV and AIDS practitioners that disability mainstreaming in HIV and AIDS is indeed possible and workable in various contexts and by implementing specific steps/initiatives; 2) transfer concrete knowledge and practices to disability stakeholders, including disabled people's organisations, on how to work in HIV and AIDS; and 3) persuade HIV-related development partners that more investment is needed to develop this knowledge base in order to bring about practical changes at micro, meso and macro levels, as well as among the population. The good practices are also intended to inspire and motivate other organisations and agencies to use and replicate them in other contexts and countries, if/when they are adapted to the needs and situations of people with disabilities and communities

LL 07

Including disability in HIV policy and programming : good practices drawn from country-based evidence : brief

MAC-SEING, Muriel
December 2014

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This brief is an introduction to the lessons learned document on good practices about the inclusion of disability in HIV policy and programming. Good practices and processes concerning the inclusion of disability issues in HIV policy and programming are highlighted, drawing on specific experiences in Senegal, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda and Cambodia and on lessons learned at international AIDS conferences

LL No 7 Brief 

Inclusion works : lessons learned on the inclusion of people with disabilities in a food security project for ultra poor women in Bangladesh

BRUIJN, Paulien
May 2014

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People with disabilities are often amongst the poorest in the developing world, and yet they are usually left out of development projects. Inclusion of persons with disabilities in mainstream development programmes is a relatively new concept in development. The ICCO Gaibandha Food Security Project in Bangladesh is one of the first programmes that has mainstreamed disability on a large scale. This book represents the lessons that are learned about mainstreaming disability in this programme. It is a source of inspiration and offers practical suggestions to make a start with including people with disabilities in (food security) projects

Including orphans and vulnerable children with disabilities in early childhood development programs : technical brief

LEVY, Marcy
MESSNER, Lyn
WERTLIEB, Donald
January 2014

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“This technical brief presents information and guidance on implementing early childhood development (ECD) programmes for young orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) with disabilities and their families. It provides a basic overview of the fundamental elements a program manager should consider to integrate disability positively into ECD programmes and address specific disabilities individually, as needed. This technical brief describes “twin-track” and “triple-track” approaches that promote participation, attention to specific needs, and equal access for OVC with disabilities and their families. It also lists six critical elements for HIV programmes seeking to address the needs of children with disabilities”

Situation analysis of programs to meet the HIV prevention, care, and treatment needs of persons with disabilities in Ghana, Uganda, and Zambia

TUN, Waimar
et al
December 2013

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With growing recognition that persons with sensory (blindness and deafness), physical, and intellectual disabilities are at risk for HIV, it is crucial to understand the HIV programming needs of persons with disabilities and challenges to accessing HIV-related services. The HIVCore project, funded by the U. S. Agency for International Development, conducted a situation analysis in Ghana, Uganda, and Zambia with persons with disabilities and service providers to describe existing HIV services for persons with disabilities, identify factors affecting access to and use of HIV services, and identify opportunities and gaps for addressing HIV service needs of persons with disabilities. By identifying the needs and challenges in HIV programming for persons with disabilities and by identifying existing programs, the findings from this assessment can be used to guide the implementation of disability-inclusive programming.

Accessibility and development : mainstreaming disability in the post-2015 development agenda

UN DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL AFFAIRS (DESA)
December 2013

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The publication reviews the concept of accessibility and its role in achieving inclusive and sustainable development. It propositions that accessibility be, not only a means and a goal of inclusive development, but also an enabler of an improved, participative economic and social environment for all members of society, including persons with disabilities.

Three key issues are addressed in the publication: (1) Accessibility in the context of human rights and development; (2) accessibility in policy and practice; and (3) accessibility and a disability-inclusive post-2015 development agenda.

The publication reviews good practices and lessons learned from both top-down and bottom-up approaches in promoting accessibility in practices and provides a response to the question: “How does accessibility relate to inclusive, sustainable and equitable development?” The publication argues that accessibility must be re-conceptualized as an enabler: a precondition for any progress toward development for all members of society.  It concludes that the full and effective participation of persons with disabilities in decision-making processes would contribute directly to the successful adoption of an inclusive post-2015 development agenda

ST/ESA/350

Strengthening communities to integrate persons with disabilities in the HIV and AIDS response in Rwanda

DELEU, Marijke
May 2013

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"This document aims to capture some of the key lessons learned from Handicap International’s New Partnership Initiative project in Rwanda, which started in 2008 with the objective to integrate persons with disabilities in HIV and Sexual Violence (SV) prevention efforts and service provision generally. It is the result of qualitative, multi-stakeholder study about how change occurred within the project and how the experience could be modelled for adaptation or replication in Rwanda or other contexts"
SD/LL 08

The state of the world’s children 2013 : children with disabilities

THE UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN’S FUND (UNICEF)
May 2013

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This report examines "the barriers from inaccessible buildings to dismissive attitudes, from invisibility in official statistics to vicious discrimination - that deprive children with disabilities of their rights and keep them from participating fully in society. The report also lays out some of the key elements of inclusive societies that respect and protect the rights of all children, regardless of disability, and progress in helping all children to flourish and make their contribution to the world"

Disability orientation

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN'S FUND (UNICEF)
May 2013

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"This web-based disability orientation for staff is a multi-media, 40-minute video that includes interesting and thought provoking statements, resources and good practices from UNICEF and partners from across the globe. The objective of the orientation is to strengthen understanding of, and capacity to support, programming for children and women with disabilities. The Disability Orientation consists of two main modules, each module has five lessons. The first part of the Orientation provides an overview of the disability movement and what disability means according to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The second part of the Orientation focusses on how to mainstream disability through our work. The Orientation on Disability can be taken individually or in groups"
Note: Video is available with English subtitles as well as accessibility options like voice over and American Sign Language

Disability inclusive millennium development goals and aid effectiveness : a conference report

LEONARD CHESHIRE DISABILITY
UN Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (UNESCAP)
2013

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This report presents the proceedings, discussions and presentations from a joint conference organised by Leonard Cheshire Disability and UNESCAP. The conference reviewed the international and regional mandates on disability and aid effectiveness, identified challenges and good practices in measuring the impact and quality of disability-inclusive development, and identified ways to implement disability-inclusive development effectively on the ground and at policy level. This report is useful for anyone interested in disability and development
"Disability inclusive millennium development goals and aid effectiveness"
14-16 March 2012
Bangkok, Thailand

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