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Instating settings of emergency education in Vienna: temporary schooling of pupils with forced migration backgrounds

PROYER, Michelle
BIEWER, Gottfried
KREUTER, Linda
WEIß, Jekaterina
2019

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In the year 2015, Austria was one of the main European destinations of displaced persons. According to education authoritiesaround 15,000 children with a forced migration background of school age who arrived in Austria over the course of a few months from late2015 to the beginning of 2016 called for immediate and partly temporary solutions. Due to Austrian legislation and unlike other countries,every child living in Austria between the ages of six to fifteen (or for nine years of schooling) is entitled to receive compulsory education. Though the school administration of Vienna generally promotes an inclusive approach to education in regular schools, schools inneighbourhoods with a large refugee population were reportedly unable to provide appropriate and adequate education for all children. Inresponse, the local school authority in Vienna decided to establish temporary classrooms in refugee accommodations. This article describesand analyses the emergence of new educational structures from the point of view of university students and lecturers who took part in theone and a half years of its implementation. The article thereby aims to document specific perspectives on educational emergency measuresat a certain point of time. In both the primary and secondary sectors, the emergence of a new temporary field of specialised and exceptional education were observed and recorded in a thick description of dynamic processes of trans-institutional, trans-organisational, transprofessional, communal, and individual development. Thus, the article presents a multifaceted picture of problems in refugee education under exceptional circumstances. The findings illustrate how insufficient educational opportunities for those falling outside the age of compulsory schooling – in particular, preschool children as well as youth older than fifteen – diminish possibilities for the inclusion of these children within and beyond education.

Local economic and inclusive development; a toolkit for replication

Humanity & Inclusion
CAMID
The Employers' Federation of Ceylon
2019

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This replication guidebook is a tool that aims to highlight the link between social exclusion and poverty and is based on the premise that a country cannot achieve its development targets, if a section of its people is left behind.

 

This guidebook aims to show practitioners practical ways of working on economic development that inclusive of socially excluded groups such as women, people with disabilities, people living in poverty, etc. It provides corresponding concepts, explains the steps and suggests tools that may help practitioners use and adapt to their context. The context of this book are based on field level experience of the project team of the Inclusive Economic Development project.

Insights from ASEAN hometown improvement project: Towards improved practice

Asia-Pacific Development Center on Disability (APCD)
2019

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The ASEAN Hometown Improvement Project, aimed to tackle challenges emerging from urbanization and the rise of the ageing population in the ASEAN region by attempting timely and relevant improvements to disability inclusive ‘hometowns’. 

 

Three approaches were utilized:

1) Promotion of an inclusive business through capacity building of persons with disabilities

2) Promotion of accessibility features in the community and other public places, as well as to information, communication, and transportation

3) Promotion of cooperation with government sector via discussions to find solutions to improve the livelihood of persons with disabilities

 

The sections, arranged per country in alphabetical order, contain the following: Hometown Improvement Project description and backgrounder; Capacity Building Workshop details; Key Partners and Stakeholders; Training Results; Challenges; Framework for Good Practice; and Way Forward and include:

  • Cambodia: Phnom Penh Center for Independent Living's Bakery by Persons with Disabilities
  • Indonesia: Batik Design and Marketing Management at Kampung Peduli
  • Malaysia: Branding and Marketing Management for Bakery and Handicraft by Persons with Disabilities at CBR Semenyih
  • Myanmar: Mushroom Production by Persons with Disabilities with Shwe Minn Tha Foundation
  • Phillipines: Sustainable Inclusive Urban Micro-Gardening and Community-Based Cooperative at Barangay 177
  • Thailand: Earthworm Casting and Cactus Farming at Farm D
  • Vietnam: Fermented Dry Bamboo Waste Fertilizer at Bamboo Dana Co. Ltd

 

 

Communication Matters!

Light for the World
January 2019

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The research Communication Matters! shows which obstacles persons with disabilities face in accessing public information and services. The research took place in three districts in the province of Pursat. 1171 persons with disabilities in 229 villages are reached.

Due to the research, many persons with disabilities were able to share their stories for the first time. Many persons were also found for the first time, because the team made an effort to visit everyone in the village.

Mapping the organisations that address disability issues in North Africa. K4D helpdesk report

QUAK, Evert-Jan
ROHWERDER, Brigitte
April 2018

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On-line research was carried out to investigate which organisations (DPOs, NGOs, multilaterals, international financial institutions, other national governments etc.) are working on addressing disability issues in North Africa? The search was done mainly in English and to a lesser extent in French. No searches in Arabic were possible. The content is ordered from a multilateral level to the national level of the five countries involved: Algeria, Egypt, Libya, Morocco and Tunisia, and begins with summaries of the situation for people with disabilities in the five countries

Good practices for the implementation of the CRPD in Indonesia (2015-2017) - Making it Work

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
WIDJAYA, Hartaning
2018

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In Indonesia, the Advocacy for Change project aimed to increase the effective participation of people with disabilities in inclusive development efforts at the local level, and promote their participation in development at the national level. Specifically, the Advocacy for Change project sought to improve and monitor the people with disabilities' access to local government processes and existing social services.

Six case studies are presented:

  • Community Based Forum as Community Public Space (The culture is the key)
  • Building the Foundation of Inclusion with Sendangadi Village Government
  • WKCP (Cerebral Palsy Family Association) Health Initiative for Health Budgeting Advocacy
  • Citizen Based Forum as a Common Space to Encourage the Government to Build a Disability-Friendly Village in Mata Air Village, Kupang Tengah Sub- district, Kupang District
  • Inclusion of Disabled Persons in Noelbaki Village Women's Forum 
  • The role of disabled people organization in participation of development with Bappeda Kupang Municipality

 

Disability and conditional social security benefits : Journal of Poverty and Social Justice, special issue, vol. 25, no.2, June 2017

GEIGER, Ben Baumberg
Ed
July 2017

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This special issue of the Journal of Poverty & Social Justice has two aims. Firstly to provide new evidence on the implementation and impacts of conditionality for disabled benefits claimants in order to provide an empirical foundation for the contested claims on both sides of this debate and secondly to prompt further research in this area. 

Article titles in this issue are:

  • Benefits conditionality for disabled people: stylised facts from a review of international evidence and practice
  • Does sanctioning disabled claimants of unemployment insurance increase labour market inactivity? An analysis of 346 British local authorities between 2009 and 2014 
  • Consequences of activation policy targeting young adults with health-related problems in Sweden and Denmark
  • Assessment of work ability in competing strands of social insurance: the German case 
  • Welfare conditionality and disabled people in the UK: claimants' perspectives
  • The bedroom tax in the Supreme Court: implications of the judgment 

Young people with intellectual disability—The role of self-advocacy in a transformed Swedish welfare system

TIDEMAN, Magnus
SVENSSON, Ove
2015

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A growing number of young people in Sweden with intellectual disability have organized themselves during the last 15 years in self-advocacy groups for socializing, empowerment, and expressing opposition to the norms and attitudes in a society that labels them as disabled. At the same time, the Swedish welfare system has transformed dramatically with processes of far-reaching individualization, closure of the major institutions, decentralization of responsibility from the state to local governments, and an emerging welfare market where service users are turned into customers. The aim of this article is to analyse and discuss the significance of self-advocacy in the new welfare context. Data were collected over a period of more than 10 years using repeated interviews with members of two self-advocacy groups and participation observations. Findings suggest that participation in self-advocacy groups opens up members for increasing health and well-being through new roles and identities, and it strengthens their control over everyday life. Support is still needed, however, but in new ways; otherwise, the restrictions of the institutions will simply be reconstructed in the new welfare system.

Applied research on disability in Africa : the Maghreb and West Africa report

BENKIRANE, Wassila
ZOUHAIRI, Abdellah
2014

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“This literature review concerns the achievements of a project which started in 2014 and will last three years. The aim of this project is the dissemination and promotion of applied research results and disability to researchers and field stakeholders of the African continent (particularly to Disabled People Organizations), in order to increase knowledge on the situation of people with disabilities and the recommendations made to improve their social participation… The mapping of applied research in West African countries shows the exclusion related to the environment, which lacks the school, health, and sports infrastructure required to promote their [people with disabilities] rights. We will mainly deal with the issue of exclusion and its multidimensional aspect in West Africa, as well as the institutional efforts to set up development plans for people with disabilities in these regions”

A Framework for Healthcare Provision to Children with Intellectual Disability

NUJUM, Z T
ANILKUMAR, T
VIJAYAKUMAR, K
ANISH, T
MOOSAN, H
2013

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Purpose: The Kudumbashree mission, an initiative of the Government of Kerala state in India, has collaborated with Local Self Governments to set up ‘Buds’, a special school system for individuals with intellectual disability. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the structure and functioning of ‘Buds’ schools, to identify the healthcare needs of the students, and to conceptualise a framework for healthcare provision.

 

Method: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 202 children at 11 registered ‘Buds’ schools in Kerala. A multidisciplinary team consisting of a psychiatrist, public health personnel and a social worker from the Medical Colleges of Kerala, visited the institutions. Data collection consisted of abstraction from medical records, interviews with parents, and clinical assessment and prescription of intervention by the specialists concerned. A pre-tested semi- structured questionnaire was used for every child. Using both quantitative and qualitative techniques, the public health personnel in the team evaluated the structure and functioning of the schools.

 

Results: The most commonly associated condition was epilepsy, seen in 11.9% of the children, while 28.2% had behavioural problems. The medicines needed were mainly anti-epileptics and drugs for behavioural problems. Interventions for self help and social skill training were also among the important requirements. The infrastructure and other facilities were poor in many schools, with the average student to teacher ratio at 14:1. While these institutions were well utilised, functioning was good only in 27.2% of the schools. Healthcare services and visits by healthcare personnel were far from adequate. This study proposes a framework in which the Medical Colleges and Health Services can function together to deliver healthcare services to children at these schools, with linkages from the District Mental Health Programme (DMHP).

 

Conclusion and Recommendation: Evidence that these schools are well utilised indicates a need to propagate this initiative in other areas of the state, country and other countries. However, improvements in infrastructure, human resources and other logistics are required. Besides, the healthcare needs of these children have to be addressed. A comprehensive healthcare programme through the existing system, using a multidisciplinary approach, needs to be developed.

Local development in West Africa : how to make it inclusive for all?

DIMBARRE KPEHOUNTON, Cathy
et al
January 2013

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“With the push towards decentralization, local governments are gradually emerging as development agents. Overarching development policies are shaped at a national level while public policies are devised and implemented at the local level by local authorities. This film showcases local stakeholders’ contribution to development. It aims to answer the question posed by many local government representatives: ‘How to make local development policies inclusive for all?’ ‘Making it INCLUSIVE’ means not only enabling the citizens to partake in consultation and decision-making processes, but also offering them equal access to services. Within this framework the most vulnerable groups, including people with disabilities, are treated on a par with others”

A Comparative Analysis of Institutional Capacities for Implementing Disability Policies in East African Countries: Functions of National Councils for Disability

YOKOYAMA, A
2012

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During the “African Decade of Persons with Disabilities (2000-2009)”, East African countries witnessed significant achievements, especially in the development of law, collection of statistics and in funding. However, many persons with disability are still marginalised from opportunities in education, healthcare and employment.

 

Purpose: With the pre-supposition that the lack of institutional capacities for implementing disability policies is the one major stumbling-block which hinders widespread delivery of social services to persons with disabilities in low-income countries, this study makes a comparative analysis of institutional capacities in the disability sectors of Uganda, Kenya and Tanzania.

 

Method: The research methods adopted were a literature survey and a field survey. The framework for analysis consists of: 1) capacities and functions of disability units in central governments, 2) relationships between central and local governments in the disability sector, and 3) relationships between governments and organisations of persons with disability (DPOs). Special attention is paid to the status, roles and functions of national councils for disability (NCDs), the independent statutory bodies recently established in each of the three countries, with clear authority and duties for the implementation of disability policies. The NCDs enable multi-sectoral stakeholders to be involved in the implementation of disability policies; therefore, positive relationships between the governments and DPOs are essential for the smooth functioning of the NCDs.

 

Results: While the result of the field survey in Tanzania reveals several effective approaches for the smooth operation of the NCD, further study is needed to verify whether these approaches would be applicable to other East African countries such as Kenya and Uganda.

Local development in West Africa : how to make it inclusive for all? : accompanying booklet

DIMBARRE KPEHOUNTON, Cathy
et al
2012

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“With the push towards decentralization, local governments are gradually emerging as development agents. Overarching development policies are shaped at a national level while public policies are devised and implemented at the local level by local authorities. This booklet accompanies the film that showcases local stakeholders’ contribution to development. It aims to answer the question posed by many local government representatives: ‘How to make local development policies inclusive for all?’ ‘Making it INCLUSIVE’ means not only enabling the citizens to partake in consultation and decision-making processes, but also offering them equal access to services. Within this framework the most vulnerable groups, including people with disabilities, are treated on a par with others”

The Face of Disability in Nigeria: A Disability Survey in Kogi and Niger States

SMITH, N
2011

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The Leprosy Mission Nigeria conducted a disability survey in Kogi and Niger States of Nigeria in 2005, investigating the demographic characteristics of people with disabilities, including gender, age, religion, marital, educational, occupational, employment and economic status, understanding of disability and health-seeking behaviour.

 

Information was gathered from a convenience sample of participants, across 30 randomly selected towns and villages in the two states. Twelve trained bilingual research assistants were used, to translate the English language questionnaire verbally into the local language of each participant.

 

From the 1093 respondents studied, the most common disabilities involved vision (37%), mobility (32%) or hearing (15%). A third of these were less than 21 years of age and had no occupation, and 72% were Muslim. Over half of them had no education, 20% had primary, 8% secondary, 2% tertiary and 18% had Islamic education. Common occupations were begging (16%), studying (14%), farming (11%) and trading (8%). The majority were unemployed (61%) due to their disability. Over 70% were not able to access disability specific health services and 37% had an assistive device. Services accessed included health - mainstream (90%), traditional (61%) and counselling (58%); and other - rehabilitation (30%), assistive device provision (24%), welfare (22%), special education (15%), vocational training (10%) and economic empowerment (4%).

 

These results are comparable with findings in other studies. Disability affects a person’s ability to participate in education, work, family life and religion, influences health-seeking behaviour and contributes to poverty.

Independence, choice and control : DLA and personal mobility in state-funded residential care|Volume 1 : report

THE LOW REVIEW
2011

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This report focuses upon: how the mobility component of DLA is being used by care home residents and the impact of the loss of this benefit; funding arrangements for meeting personal mobility needs between local authorities and care home providers; and responsibilities of care home providers in relation to the mobility needs of residents. Over 800 submissions from individuals, local authorities and providers were provided , and six oral evidence sessions were held for the compilation of this report
The executive summary and report are available in both word and pdf formats
Oral and written evidence is contained in volume 2 available on the website

Rights in action : good practices for inclusive local governance in West Africa

PIATTA, Francesca
September 2010

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This is a presentation on the report of the Rights in Action initiative. The primary objective of this Making It Work initiative is to promote practical, evidence-based recommendations on how to achieve inclusive local governance in West Africa, based on collected examples of good practice in line with Article 29 of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, so that people with disabilities have an active role in shaping the local policies and services that impact directly on their lives. The presentation outlines the objectives of the initiative, the approach used and advocacy activities

Promoting good practices to reach personal mobility of persons with disabilities in the metropolitan area of Guatemala

QUAN CHANG, Silvia Judith
2010

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This presentation discusses the Making It Work multi-stakeholder initiative which documented and promoted good practice of accessible transportation in order to improve accessibility in three municipalities in Guatemala. Good practice examples were collected from other South American cities relating to: legislation and policies; disabled people’s organisations participation and political advocacy results; and technical solutions.  The presentation summarises the objectives and approach of the report, and advocacy activities, and it does not give examples of good practice or recommendations

Note: The original report is in Spanish and has not been translated

Philippine CBR manual : an inclusive development strategy

MCGLADE, Barney
MENDOZA, Veronica Ester
Eds
2009

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This is an executive summary of a manual that is intended as a guide to decision makers in Local Government Units on how to institutionalise and implement programme that ensure the inclusion of persons with disabilities in all activities in the community – and ensure these activities are part of the annual work and financial plan of government and other local groups.  While the manual is intended for government decision makers, it can also be used by CBR workers and managers to understand inclusion, CBR in the rights-based context, the historical perspective and evolving definition of disability as well as how to start CBR, how to organize DPOs and communities, and how to undertake training and advocacy

The publisher has given permission for the uploaded document to be reproduced and made publicly available on the Source website

Inclusive local development - How to implement a disability approach at local level

GEISER, Priscille
PLANTIER-ROYAN, Eric
2009

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This policy paper, deals with Handicap International’s mandate and values in the field of the inclusive local development. It is an action guide that presents the approaches and reference tools for Handicap International’s actions, choices and commitments. The aim is to promote consistency in the practices of various programmes working in the area of inclusive local development, while taking into account the different contexts and circumstances encountered.

An ADA guide for local governments making community emergency preparedness and response programs accessible to people with disabilities

US DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE, Civil Rights Division
2008

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This guide provides guidance for how to make local government emergency preparedness and response program accessible for persons with disabilities. It helps to identify needs and evaluate effective, accessible and inclusive emergency management practices. The following issues are explored: planning, notification, evacuation, sheltering, returning home and contracting for emergency services

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