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Challenges and priorities for global mental health in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) era

ACADEMY OF MEDICAL SCIENCES
June 2018

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Published in 2011, the Grand Challenges in Global Mental Health initiative provided a framework to guide the research needed to improve treatment and prevention of mental health disorders and expand access to mental health services. At the Academy’s workshop on global mental health participants reflected on progress since 2011, focusing on specific life-course stages, and identified priorities for research in treatment and prevention, as well as enduring challenges and emerging opportunities

How politics and economics intersect : a simple guide to conducting political economy and context analysis

OXFAM
June 2014

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"The intention of this guide is to provide practical guidance on how Oxfam undertakes political economy analysis (PEA) in order to inform operations and programming. It is based on the experience of working with Oxfam Myanmar (and heavily features this experience), initially looking at how PEA could be used to address two areas: 1) ‘How can citizens/civil society get engaged with local planning and budgeting processes?’ and 2) ‘How will the economic opening up of Myanmar affect small-scale farmers?’"

Local rehabilitation workshops - LOREWO

December 2006

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This website provides information about how to acquire assistive devices and rehabilitation services that are flexible and designed to be adapted to suit local situations and using existing, local resources. It would be useful for anyone with an interest in providing access to assistive devices in low and middle income countries

Community television for the poor : a scoping study. Final technical report. The one to watch, literally?

BACHELOR, S
SCOTT, N
EASTWICK, G
et al
2005

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A technical report on the use of community television. The purpose of the research was to explore the opportunities presented by digital convergence for locally produced and broadcast integrated television and radio for development education, development communication strategies and local content capture among the poor. The research confirms the starting premises of the research, that community radio is known to have strong developmental benefits; that there is a strong trend towards television, even among the poor; and that there will be new opportunities for audiovisual media presented by digital convergence. The report concludes that community television could play a huge role in empowering local communities

Nepal starts Asian broadcasts with HIV/AIDS and development programming

UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME
June 2003

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This web article from the UNDP Newsfront details a programme started in June 2003, which uses satellite digital radio broadcasts to reach rural communities in Nepal with locally produced programmes. They give valuable information on HIV, AIDS and gender issues through a new initiative by UNDP and several other partners. Shows on early childhood development and micro-finance are being developed

A dialogue on ICTs and poverty : the Harvard Forum

HARVARD UNIVERSITY
2003

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In September 2003, 30 experts from around the world gathered at Harvard University to discuss how ICTs can help to reduce poverty. These multimedia files give a brief survey of their discussions, concerns and conclusions

Revisiting the "magic box" : case studies in local appropriation of information and communication technologies (ICTs)

BATCHELOR, Simon
O’FARRELL, Clare
2003

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This book looks at the way communities and groups in developing countries are appropriating information and communication technologies (ICTs) to address their needs. It finds that ICTs are being integrated into wider community-based activities and adapted to fit different contexts. It follows on from the paper "Discovering the Magic Box". It finds that there are still few examples of community-driven and locally appropriated ICT initiatives and an absence of standards or guidelines to evaluate ICT-based projects. The book includes some analytical frameworks and indicators to identify good practice and evidence of impact A significant development has been in the growth of telecommunications, in particular mobile phones, that are relatively cheap and powerful tools for poor communities, even in remote areas. The book concludes that the power of oral communication through telephones and radio cannot be underestimated. The book proposes that the main challenge is to adapt the new, usually computer-based ICTs to the needs of poor, predominantly oral-based communities so that they can be appropriated effectively and quickly

Livelihoods approaches to information and communication in support of rural poverty elimination and food security

CHAPMAN, Robert
SLAYMAKER, Tom
YOUNG, John
2003

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FAO, DFID and ODI undertook a study in 2001/2 to analyse the role of information in livelihoods, and make recommendations on how agencies can capitalise on and integrate the best elements of traditional communication methods and new information and communication (ICT) technologies within the livelihoods approach. This publication provides the results of the initial literature review, comprised of a 30 page paper followed by 20 pages of heavily annotated references. The key conclusions were that information and communications systems are most likely to improve livelihoods in rural areas if they: share costs appropriately; ensure equitable access to all; contain a high proportion of local or appropriately localised content; build on existing systems; build capacity; use realistic technologies; and build knowledge partnerships

Strengthening local capacities to create and adapt healthcare information

PAKENHAM-WALSH, Neil
October 2002

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The key messages of this report centre around the current global information explosion and its limited impact on access to relevant, practical information for healthcare providers in developing countries, who continue to lack access to the basic information they need. Relevance and reliability are paramount in meeting health information needs. Local 'health information providers' (publishers, libraries, NGOs, Ministries of Health) are best placed to provide content for local 'end users'. The effectiveness of the international 'health information community' is dependent on its ability to facilitate the expression of local knowledge and experience, and to promote dialogue and exchange among local providers and end users. Local producers and end users must be involved from the earliest stages in dialogue, priority-setting, problem-solving, creative thinking, and generation of plans for action. Creation and adaptation of local content requires access to a wide range of existing source materials, both internationally and nationally. Creation and adaptation of local content is resource-intensive and requires the full range of skills, including medical knowledge, knowledge of end-users needs, and writing and editorial skills. Traditional knowledge and 'scientific' knowledge are mutually reinforcing and can be combined in ways that enhance the quality and coverage of healthcare in developing countries. ICTs present new opportunities to enhance the above processes

Using ICTs to generate development content

BATCHELOR, Simon
October 2002

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This report examines how information can be packaged and communicated so that it reflects the context of the reciever. It stresses that communication and information provision is a process like any other in development, and ICTs should be seen as tools to improve livelihoods, and not an end in and of themselves. It reviews recent research on the types of information demanded by communities, and emphasises the importance of visual content for including non- and semi-literate people. The paper outlines then key elements required in any planned content production, especially by NGOs or governments. A final comment is made on intellectual property rights (IPR)

Collecting and propagating local development content : synthesis and conclusions

BALLANTYNE, Peter
May 2002

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Drawing from a consultation process to examine how local content in developing countries is created, adapted, and exchanged, this report provides some answers to these questions. It is a synthesis of lessons; the case stories which are reproduced in an accompanying report provide details on actual experienses and lessons from the ground

Unlocking economic opportunity in the South through local content : a proposal from the G8 Dotforce

ARMSTRONG, Peter
et al
March 2002

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A detailed proposal for contributing to the G8 Dotforce process to bridge the digital divide, through local content and applications creation. It explores the ideas of freely available information versus creating a local market for development information, retaining intellectual property rights and stimulating a new kind of trade. The proposed creation of an 'Open Knowledge Network' reflects the need to try and support different initiatives and approaches to local content creation and sharing, in different sectors and environments

Challenges and concerns

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This article follows on from several case studies presented on the Reproductive Health Outlook website. It draws together key issues based on a review of recent literature and project experiences. The main themes are around the significant financial, political, cultural and technological obstacles that affect the establishment of sustainable programmes, especially for computer-based ICTs. These obstacles have been identified as lack of affordability, lack of human capacity, lack of awareness of the benefits of ICT, lack of ability to use ICT proficiently, and lack of content suitable for local residents. ICTs that rely on access to the Internet need good-quality access to be truly useful

Open knowledge network

OKN

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Open Knowledge Network is an initiative to support the creation and exchange of local content in local languages across the South, supported by a range of information and communication technologies (ICTs). The health content is especially useful for community-based health organisations

Panos

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This is the website of the Panos network, which works with the media and other communicators to foster debate on under-reported, misrepresented or misunderstood development issues. Panos includes, and advocates for the inclusion of, the voices and views of those most affected by these issues - usually the poorest and most marginalised people in society - in order to find lasting solutions. There are eight Panos institutes around the world, each of which has its own website

Pillars

TEARFUND

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PILLARS is an approach for producing written information, in local languages, that is useful to local people - not just translating, but enabling community members to record their experiences and ideas. This CD-ROM contains the PILLARS Workbook in PDF format, which guides the process; and, to facilitate the design process, the PILLARS document files in Adobe Acrobat 3.0 (pdf), QuarkXPress 3.3 and PageMaker 6.5 formats for each of the existing English, French, Spanish and Portuguese Guides, together with all the image files required. It also includes a PageMaker template for creating new Guides, and PageMaker files for producing letterheads and a certificate for use by local groups

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