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Inclusion of persons with disabilities in Covid-19 response and recovery: seven steps to implementing the IASC Guidelines

PALMER, Tom
June 2020

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A brief overview of the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Guidelines on inclusion of persons with disabilities in humanitarian action is given. Key points of the Humanitarian Policy Group (HPG) roundtable meeting (Mar 2020) are summarised, along with their implications for practice during the Covid-19 response. These are: accessible formats; learning and evidence; tools; training; coordination and partnerships; strategies for organisational change and accountability.

COVID-19: How to include marginalized and vulnerable people in risk communication and community engagement

UN WOMEN
TRANSLATORS WITHOUT BORDERS
March 2020

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Recommendations for inclusion of marginalised and vulnerable groups in risk communications and community engangement are made. Groups considered are: children; people with disabilities; women and girls; pregnant women; persons living with HIV; gender based violence survivors; refugees and migrants; elderly; people in existing humanitarian emergencies; people with pre-existing medical conditions; sexual and gender minorities; ethnic minorities.

Participation in Practice: Examples of inclusive action for a “Participation Revolution”

March 2020

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Humanitarian organizations and donors have committed to change the way humanitarian action is carried out and create a “Participation Revolution.” In this webinar issues addressed included:

  • inclusion of the people and communities affected by humanitarian crises in practice;
  • how organizations are ensuring that the voices of the most vulnerable groups considering gender, age, ethnicity, language, and special needs are heard and acted upon;
  • how program activities and budgets are designed to support the changes that affected people demand


In this webinar, organized on 26 March 2020 by PHAP and the Steering Committee for Humanitarian Response, we took stock of the progress to date on workstream six of the Grand Bargain and heard success stories from the field that can help agencies achieve a sustained change in how they design and deliver their programs.

 

A full transcript is available. Webinar registrants were asked to provide what they thought, in their context, was the most important factor enabling participation in practice and what they thought was the most important factor preventing participation in practice. Answers are provided in an Annex.

Disability inclusion helpdesk; evidence digest issue 1, June 2019

SDDirect
June 2019

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The Evidence Digest aims to capture knowledge emerging from Helpdesk activities in a systematic manner and disseminate findings. This short summary will:

Share information on and learnings from the Disability Inclusion Helpdesk over the last quarter, highlighting headline messages and implications for programmers and policymakers;
Share relevant information and learning from other DID outputs;
Provide relevant information on recent evidence, policy changes and events in the field of disability inclusion, and;
Raise awareness on how to access the Helpdesk and demonstrate its offer.

Online collective identities for autism: The perspective of Brazilian parents

ANTUNES, Debora
DHOEST, Alexander
2018

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The importance of online communities for parents of people with disabilities has been discussed by many scholars in the fields of Digital and Disability Studies, showing, for instance, the importance of social support and the formation of social ties. In order to contribute to this scholarship, this paper explores how collective identity models are built and circulated by parents of autistic people in one of the biggest Brazilian online communities about the subject, ‘Sou autista… conheça o meu mundo’ (I am autistic…get to know my world). The results were obtained through a digital ethnography, based on participant observation and an exchange of information with the members of the community studied. Based on the data collected, the study concludes that the collective identity models that circulate in this community can be grouped into legitimising, resistant, and project identities, as postulated by Castells (2010). The different views reflect how parents see autism and represent the ways it is treated in Brazilian society.

 

Disability and the Global South, 2018 Vol.5, No. 1

Transnationalizing disability policy in embedded cultural-cognitive worldviews: the case of Sub-Saharan Africa

HAANG’ANDU, Privilege
2018

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In 2013, the European Union (EU) mission in Zambia made a public statement about its financial support to the LGBTI community. In panic and fear, LGBTI leaders urged the EU office to withdraw the statement and encouraged other foreign missions to instead offer discrete support to the LGBTI community. This anecdote is illustrative of the experiential gap between geopolitical groups confronting a similar policy issue. For the EU, the rights of LGBTI persons are universally important; for the LGBTI community in the Zambian context, safety and discretion are more important. This paradox illustrates the challenges facing the transnationalizing of disability policy. How could we explain the fact that transnational disability actors have for the last two decades been trying to disseminate disability ‘knowledge’ and norms in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) without corresponding social policy and ideational success? This article examines this policy and ontological discrepancy. Advancing a constructivist argument, the article contends that transnational policy diffusion, largely built on colonial legacies of universalizing Western knowledge paradigms, has preoccupied itself with political institutional engagements at the expense of engaging contextspecific sociological and ideological factors, resulting in sterile legislative exercises. To develop a truly SSA-relevant disability policy infrastructure, the article proposes ideational bricolaging and translation, a constructivist process of carefully adhering to and negotiating with context-specific ideational factors that inform the disability experience in SSA countries.

 

Disability & the Global South (DGS), 2018, Vol. 5 No. 1

Humanitarian Hands on Tool (HHoT)

CBM
2017

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The CBM smartphone app 'Humanitarian Hands-on Tool' (HHoT) provides step-by-step guidance on how to implement an inclusive emergency response. With disability-inclusive humanitarian action broken down into individual task cards, which explain the basic 'how-to' details in simple language and images, this web-based tool and downloadable mobile app aims to become the ‘go-to’ field resource for all agencies planning humanitarian work that leaves no-one behind

Global report: Self-Advocacy for inclusion

INCLUSION INTERNATIONAL
November 2016

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Across the Inclusion International network, many individuals and organisations took part in workshops, surveys and interviews to report:

  • what self-advocacy means to them
  • what good support is 
  • how organisations can be more inclusive
  • the vital role that families play in empowering self-advocacy.

This report provides a snapshot of work, and has some useful information for self-advocates, supporters, organisations and families. As well as containing the results from the global survey, interviews and workshops, this report also provides some useful guidance for anyone who wants to make the world more inclusive for people with intellectual disabilities.

 

A website (www.selfadvocacyportal.com) has been developed to share good practice and resources.

The promise and the reality: a mental health workforce perspective on technology-enhanced youth mental health service delivery

ORLOWSKI, Simone
LAWN, Sharon
MATTHEWS, Ben
et al
October 2016

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Digital technologies show promise for reversing poor engagement of youth (16–24 years) with mental health services. In particular, mobile and internet based applications with communication capabilities can augment face-to-face mental health service provision. Results of in-depth qualitative data drawn from various stakeholders involved in provision of youth mental health services in one Australian rural region are described. Data were obtained using focus groups and semi-structured interviews with regional youth mental health clinicians, youth workers and support/management staff and analysed via inductive thematic analysis. Six main themes were identified: young people in a digital age, personal connection, power and vulnerability, professional identity, individual factors and organisational legitimacy. 

 

DOI: 10.1186/s12913-016-1790-y

Mental Health Innovation Network (MHIN)

May 2016

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MHIN is a network  for the global mental health community to  communicate and share knowledge, experiences and resources to improve the quality and coverage of care. Provides searchable innovations and resources. The community area hosts blogs, podcasts, webinars and forums.

AuthorAid

AUTHORAID
December 2015

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AuthorAid is a tool to help researchers in developing countries to network and further disseminate their work to a wider audience. The website contains links to find mentors/collaborators, a range of E-learning opportunities, funding opportunities for people working in developing countries, and a plethora of resources on topics ranging from how to write a grant proposal though to the publication process itself

A world that counts : mobilising the data revolution for sustainable development

UNITED NATIONS (UN) INDEPENDENT EXPERT ADVISORY GROUP ON A DATA REVOLUTION FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT (IEAG)
November 2014

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This report highlights two big global challenges for the current state of data: whole groups of people are not being counted and important aspects of people’s lives and environmental conditions are still not measured; and there are huge and growing inequalities in access to data and information, and in the ability to use it. The report makes specific recommendations on how to address these challenges, calling for a UN-led effort to mobilise the data revolution for sustainable development: fostering and promoting innovation to fill data gaps; mobilising resources to overcome inequalities between developed and developing countries and between data-poor and data-rich people; leadership and coordination to enable the data revolution to play its full role in the realisation of sustainable development

The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities Training Guide : Professional Training Series No. 19

UNITED NATIONS HUMAN RIGHTS OFFICE OF THE HIGH COMISSIONER
2014

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These eight training modules are meant to “inform and empower those who are involved in ratifying, implementing and monitoring the two instruments. While the Training Guide is mainly targeted at facilitators of training courses on the Convention and its Optional Protocol, it acknowledges that each and every one of us has a role to play. I recommend wide dissemination of the training package, and its use by all those who want to embark upon the essential journey towards greater awareness and effective implementation of the rights of persons with disabilities and, ultimately, the building of an inclusive society for all.”

Disaster risk reduction through climate change adaptation : Incheon declaration, remap and action plan

NATIONAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, REPUBLIC OF KOREA
October 2010

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This conference report presents a summary of the agreements made during the fourth Asian Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction. The report contains a roadmap, agreed by the States in attendance, to establish climate resilient disaster risk management (DRM) systems that contribute to sustainable development at regional, national, sub national and community levels by 2015. This roadmap details a wide range of activities, including delivering training to key stakeholders, developing communication plans relating to disaster risk reduction, and the promotion of child- and people-centered education for community preparedness and risk reduction

The 4th Asian Ministerial Conference on Disaster Risk Reduction

25-28 October 2010

Incheon, Republic of Korea

National partnership platforms on HIV and TB : a toolkit to strengthen civil society information, dialogue and advocacy

RAMAKANT, Bobby
et al
2009

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This toolkit aims to share the learning on national partnership programmes (NPP) so far, The examples, case studies, challenges and processes described are therefore a ‘work-in-progress’ rather than perfectly presented material. The toolkit also provides examples of successful initiatives using the NPP approach. A NPP is based on the principle that information is power, providing tools for information sharing, networking and dialogue. NPPs facilitate the process of consensus building, developing an informed common advocacy agenda and implementing effective country level advocacy on HIV and TB

Mapping dialogue : a research project profiling dialogue tools and processes for social change

BOJER, Marianne Mille
MCKAY, Elaine
ROEHL, Heiko
April 2006

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This report profiles ten methods for facilitating dialogue. The approaches are diverse: some are designed for small groups, others for large numbers of people; some explore conflict while others are based on what is agreed. Part 1 looks at the foundations for, and approaches to, dialogue and offers some background on dialogue in traditional African culture. Part 2 maps out ten dialogue methods in depth and a number of others more briefly. Part 3 offers some ideas for how to assess what method to use in a given context

A strategy to enhance the global research effort in maternal and child health : the Mother-Child International Research Network

HAMILTON, Richard
March 2006

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This article presents the mission and objectives of the Mother-Child International Research Network. The network aims to support and bring together researchers and research institutions working in the field of mother and child health in low-income countries, facilitating access to scientific debate and opportunities for collaboration. The network's website www.mother-child.org holds scientific updates, distance-learning activities and weblog facilities and is designed to support health communication and exchange and increase exposure to a wide international audience

Lessons learned from the nine communities funded through the Connecting Communities for Better Health program

FOUNDATION FOR EHEALTH INITIATIVE
2006

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This document brings together the experiences and lessons learned in the implementation of health information exchange (HIE) initiatives as part of Connecting Communities for Better Health programme. The programme provides support to health information organisations and initiatives across the United States, but lessons can be applied to other contexts and settings. Covers all main components of programme planning and implementation, including: creating business models; planning and building IT infrastructure; getting started; assessing the environment; developing a shared vision; marketing; resource allocation and budget; data collection and evaluation; replication of prior success as a project strategy

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