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Managing knowledge in health services

BOOTH, Andrew
WALTON, Graham
2000

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This book examines the role of information management in health care. It is not specifically about developing countries, but parts may be relevant to evolving health care systems and information services in development. Part 1 looks at the context within which health care is delivered and examines the different users who have access to the knowledge base; Part 2 outlines the principles underlying the way health information resources and services are organized and managed; and Part 3 discusses the skills required to use the knowledge base effectively. Within this structure, individual chapters cover issues of particular relevance, such as marketing the information service, training the users, sources of health knowledge and searching the knowledge base

Assessing community telecentres : guidelines for researchers

WHYTE, Anne
2000

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This guidebook will assist researchers as they assess and evaluate the role and impact of community telecentres. It provides an introduction to some of the key research issues, a framework for telecentre evaluation, and an impetus for research teams to share ideas, instruments, and methods. Assessing Community Telecentres will interest researchers, practitioners, and academics in information science, communications, international development, and evaluation, including telecentre operators, telecentre managers, and community leaders. [Publisher's abstract]

The role of international organisations and non-governmental organisations in information support for agricultural policy formulation in Kenya : study report

OWINO, Frederick
June 1999

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Describes the roles of NGOs and international organisations in supporting the production, communication and use of information for agricultural policy formulation in Kenya. Identifies the strengths and weaknesses of the current process, and ends with proposals for the future, to support the links between research and analysis, and among farmers, researchers and decision makers

The tyranny of participation in information systems : learning from development projects

HEEKS, Richard
March 1999

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This paper sets out to investigate and understand some of the problems of participatory approaches. It does so by recognising the parallels between debate on the role and value of participation in information systems (IS) development, and debate on the role and value of participation in development projects more generally. These projects aim to deliver development goals and they have frequently involved participation. They therefore provide fertile ground for learning about approaches to information systems development. Participation is seen to fail in such projects because it ignores context; because it is itself ignored; because it ignores reality; and because it ignores other factors. Based on this analysis, a more critical approach to participation in IS projects is suggested, with three critical questions identified that must be answered before participation can be considered

Locally generated printed materials in agriculture : an experience from Uganda and Ghana

CARTER, Isabel
1999

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This report examines the usefulness of locally generated information material to (near-) subsistence level farmers in Uganda and Ghana. It questions the assumption that non-literate farmers do not benefit from information material and shows the variety of vectors and strategies that communities use to disseminate new knowledge. It examines the conventional theoretical and practical bases for the provision of information and contrasts these with practice at community level. The starting point for the report is a survey of Footsteps readership by Tearfund. Footsteps is a widely disseminated newsletter on community development, aimed at near-subsistence level farmers. It seeks to provide farmers with printed agricultural information in their own language and appropriate for their situation

Best practices on indigenous knowledge

UNITED NATIONS EDUCATION SCIENCE AND CULTURE ORGANIZATION (UNESCO). Management of Social Transformations Programme (MOST)
NETHERLANDS ORGANIZATION FOR INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION IN HIGHER EDUCATION. Centre for International Research and Advisory Networks (NUFFIC/CIRAN)
Eds
1999

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This publication provides a series of case studies to illustrate how indigenous knowledge (IK) can be used to create sustainable development. It aims to suggest, by example, guidelines for development planning, as the practices described may give policy makers and development practitioners a deeper insight into the ecological and cultural complexity of sustainable development. Includes basic definition of IK and related terms, and indexes by country and theme

National policy on HIV/AIDS for Zimbabwe 1999

GOVERNMENT OF ZIMBABWE
1999

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Sets out Zimbabwe's national policy and guiding principles on HIV/AIDS in relation to public health, care for people living with HIV/AIDS, human rights, gender, information and education about HIV/AIDS, and HIV/AIDS/STI research

TB advocacy : a practical guide 1999

OWENS, Becky
KLAUDT, Kraig
1998

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Using tuberculosis as an example, this guide goes through the stages of documenting the situation, packaging the message, working with the media, and mobilizing others to effect change through advocacy

Working with indigenous knowledge : a guide for researchers

GRENIER, Louise
1998

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This book provides an examination of indigenous knowledge and what it can offer a sustainable development strategy, and offers a guide to collecting, using, and assessing indigenous knowledge. Includes a review of case studies in Indonesia, Ecuador, Ethiopia, and Venezuela

Making clear messages [whole issue]

1998

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Provides suggestions on now to develop materials to support education about sensitive issues around HIV and sexual health. It offers ideas and examples of how some organisations have used different methods, and suggests where to get further information

Bridge builders : African experiences with information and communication technology

NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL
Office of International Affairs
1996

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This volume tells sixteen first-person accounts of how information and communication technologies (ICT) have been successfully introduced into institutions for the benefit of scientists and engineers in sub-Saharan Africa. The authors provide case studies that focus on the lessons learned in designing and implementing projects dealing with scientific and technological information (STI) and that examine the impacts these projects have had. The projects demonstrate just how much can be accomplished through leadership, dedication, and determination

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