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Improving social inclusion and empowerment for people with disabilities in low- and middle-income countries: why does it matter and what works?

WHITE, Howard
SARAN, Ashrita
POLLOCK, Sarah
KUPER, Hannah
July 2018

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The aim of the Rapid Evidence Assessment (REA) is to provide an assessment of the effectiveness of interventions to improve social inclusion and empowerment for people with disabilities in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). The studies included in this REA are taken from the Disability EGM prepared by the Campbell Collaboration for DFID under the auspices of the Centre for Excellence for Development Impact and Learning (CEDIL). Eligible studies included systematic reviews and impact evaluations published in English from 2000 onwards that assessed the effectiveness of interventions for people with disabilities in LMICs. The REA focused on studies identified by the EGM process that included ‘social inclusion’ or ‘empowerment’ as study outcomes and used the World Health Organization CBR matrix as a framework to categorise the different interventions and outcomes considered by the studies available. Evidence limitations and gaps were identified. 

There were 16 eligible primary studies, including studies conducted in 12 countries: Bangladesh (two studies), Brazil, Chile, China (two studies), Ethiopia, India (three studies), Kenya (two studies), Malaysia, Thailand, Turkey, Uganda, and Vietnam (two studies). Five of the studies concern interventions for people with physical or sensory impairments, nine for people with mental health or neurological conditions, and two for all disability types.

Inclusive disaster risk reduction

LAFRENIERE, Annie
WALBAUM, Veronique
2017

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This policy paper defines the themes of inclusive disaster risk reduction and explains how these activities fit into the HI mandate. It also identifies the target population and defines modalities of intervention–standard expected outcomes, standard activities–as well as monitoring and evaluation indicators.

Child-centred disaster risk reduction : building resilience through participation : lessons from Plan International

PLAN INTERNATIONAL
2010

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This report “presents the results and recommendations of a five-year programme and…includes a series of case studies illustrating how child-centred Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) supports the delivery of the Hyogo Framework’s Priorities for Action, as well as the realisation of children’s rights to education, health and participation within disaster risk contexts…Child-centred Disaster Risk Reduction is an innovative approach to Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) that fosters the agency of children and youth, in groups and as individuals, to work towards making their lives safer and their communities more resilient to disasters”

Facilitating HIV testing and disclosure with children and adolescents

INDIA HIV/AIDS ALLIANCE
June 2009

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This report looks at the challenges in facilitating testing and disclosure for children in 0-6, 7-14 and 15-18 age groups. The report is based on operations research conducted by India HIV/AIDS Alliance in Andhra Pradesh and Manipur. This operations research was aimed at understanding current challenges with facilitating testing and disclosure for children, and to provide possible short to medium term solutions. Three broad objectives of the study were: * Identifying challenges and factors that prevent the community from seeking HIV testing of their children * Understanding issues related to disclosure of HIV status to children, and the social impact related to disclosure faced by parents and children * Using the study findings in formulating practical solutions to address these issues, and to come up with practical recommendations on building links between policy and practice

Scaling up memory work : the example of KIWAKKUKI in Tanzania

WARD, Nicola
ITEMBA, Dafrosa
2006

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Scaling up the memory work and extending it from Uganda to other African countries involved many challenges due to the wide range of different contexts, different types of implementing organisations and different cultures. This edition of Health Exchange gives an example from Tanzania where the organisation KIWAKKUKI, has developed a memory project based on experience and learning from NACWOLA in Uganda, but adapted to its specific cultural and organisational context

Orphans and other vulnerable children support toolkit

INTERNATIONAL HIV/AIDS ALLIANCE
FAMILY HEALTH INTERNATIONAL
December 2005

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This is a collection of information, tools and guidance on supporting orphans and other vulnerable children living in a world with HIV/AIDS. It covers a wide range of subject areas, including running a programme, health and nutrition, education, psychosocial support, economic strengthening, living environments and children's rights. It contains a wide range of useful resources on the different topic areas. It also contains a section on early childhood development

Memory work [whole issue]

June 2005

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This issue of Medicus Mundi Schweiz Bulletin is devoted to memory work. Articles describe the evolution of memory books and memory work; NACWOLA’s experiences in Uganda; scaling up memory work; and related projects and tools such as hero books and the Ten Million Memories Project

HIV and young children : an annotated bibliography on psychosocial perspectives

SHERR, Lorraine
February 2005

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This annotated bibliography offers a practical guide to the content of the references which informed the literature review presented in BVLF Working Paper 33 (Young Children and HIV/AIDS: Mapping the Field). It is intended to help readers who want to go deeper into the issues and explore the original source material. The bibliography presents the references - mostly to peer-reviewed medical or psychology journals - under subject headings such as "disclosure", "interventions", "parentless children", "social development", and more

Orphans and schooling in Africa : a longitudinal analysis

EVANS, David
MIGUEL, Edward
2005

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This paper looks at the impact of parent death on primary school participation using an unusual five-year panel data set of over 20,000 children in rural Kenya. There was a focus on children who began the study period as non-orphans and compare children who subsequently lost a parent to those who did not. There is a substantial decrease in school participation following a parent death as well as evidence of a drop before the death. Effects are largest for children whose mothers died, for young girls (under age 12) and for children with low base line academic performance. The authors then discuss implications for the design of programmes to assist orphans and vulnerable children

HIV/AIDS : what about very young children?

DUNN, Alison
July 2004

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This short paper reflects findings from research carried out to identify current responses to meet the needs of children age 0-8 living in HIV/AIDS affected communities. The overall results show that at local, national and international levels there are gaps in programming and policy to engage ideas and mobilise resources to address the needs and experiences of very young children both infected and affected by HIV/AIDS. The question is then raised: What can we actually do to include very young children in programming and policy responses in HIV/AIDS affected communities? Supporting existing family and community networks and current efforts that are being made by people confronting HIV/AIDS on a daily basis are important strategies. Conclusions are drawn indicating that services are required urgently to support very young children both directly and through the families and communities in which they live. Ways of listening to and including very young children in these processes need to be developed and used. Partnerships need to be developed between parents, families, NGOs, CBOs and government to ensure the holistic development of the child. At policy levels, very young children need to be included in programmes that address children, HIV/AIDS and community development. All government ministries can participate in meeting the needs of very young children in HIV/AIDS affected communities

The journey of life : a community workshop to support children

REGIONAL PSYCHOSOCIAL SUPPORT INITIATIVE (REPSSI)
June 2004

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'The Journey of Life' is a community workshop curriculum to support children. This workshop seeks to address the increasing psychological and social needs of children affected by HIV/AIDS, war, and displacement. Its objective is to raise community awareness of the problems that children face growing up in a time of HIV/AIDS, war, and family disintegration. 'The Journey of Life' assists the community to identify children in need of social, emotional, intellectual, spiritual, and physical support. Through dialogue and reflection the community better understands how to use available resources in solving the problems that children encounter and to strengthen the resilience of their children. The workshop covers the areas of meeting children's needs; understanding children's problems; identifying children who need help; building children's strengths; and community mobilisation. The workshop manual can be used without additional training, though further training has been found to be helpful. A Facilitator's Guide accompanies the workshop

Children Affected by AIDS (CABA) online forum

SYNERGY PROJECT
2004

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The CABA (Children Affected by AIDS) online discussion forum was established by the US Agency for International Development (USAID) to facilitate vital discussion and information exchange on efforts to mitigate the impact of HIV/AIDS on children, families and communities. USAID and the Synergy Project, which hosts the forum on behalf of USAID, encourages all to participate.
The website includes listings of HIV/AIDS websites, grouped by topic and by country. Areas covered include: global HIV/AIDS, women, children and youth, tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS, donors, Africa, Newly Independent States, Asia and the Near East, Latin America and the Caribbean

Family and community interventions for children affected by AIDS

RICHTER, Linda
MANEGOLD, Julie
PATHER, Riashnee
2004

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This report, based on over 400 documents, reviews the available scientific and programmatic information on interventions aimed at children, families, households and communities. Specifically, the report considers: home-based child-centred development programmes focussing on health and nutrition; psychosocial care and management of inherited assets; interventions directed at supporting families and households to cope with the HIV/AIDS problem and interventions directed at building the capacities of communities to provide long-term care and support for children and households. It also contains an annotated bibliography of available literature in this area in Section 2. The main emphasis of the report is on intervention principles rather than on actual program implementation details as it is widely understood that interventions need to be tailored for each particular situation. There is no specific focus on very young children but interventions to support children, families and communities run into each other with inevitable overlaps

Taking better care? Review of a decade of work with orphans and vulnerable children in Rakai, Uganda

WITTER, Sophie
CALDER, George
AHIMBISIBWE, Timothy
2004

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Taking Better Care looks at the situation facing orphaned and vulnerable children in the Rakai District in Uganda and at the legacy of Save the Children's Child Social Care Project (CSCP) there. The report examines the impact of the CSCP, implemented between 1991 and 1996, and at trends in Rakai since the CSCP ended, as well as outlining the lessons learned and providing recommendations for future action. It concludes that in order to support orphans and vulnerable children in a long-term, sustainable way, child-care models now need to incorporate a maximum of state support and civil society mobilisation, combined with more traditional family support

Disability and HIV & AIDS : a participatory rapid assessment of the vulnerability, impact, and coping mechanisms of parents of disabled children on HIV & AIDS

NGANZI, Patrick
MATONHODZE, George
2004

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This study assesses the vulnerability, impact and coping mechanisms of parents of disabled children on HIV/AIDS and suggests strategies for developing an HIV and AIDS programme. Using participatory methodologies of inquiry, the study found that the parents of disabled children are at a higher risk of infection to sexually transmitted infections (STI) and/or HIV and that the risk increases as the parents try to cope with having a disabled child. Therefore, a disabled child in a family acts as one of the pre-disposing factors to the parents' infection and when an infection happens in a home, the quality of care for the very disabled child is compromised causing a vicious cycle of disability and HIV/AIDS at the household level.The study recommends that target-specific interventions should be designed and implemented for the parents of disabled children to address issues of HIV/AIDS and disability, empowerment and gender issues as well as sexual reproductive health

Operational guidelines for supporting early child development (ECD) in multi-sectoral HIV/AIDS programs in Africa

SEIFMAN, Richard
SURRENCY, Amber
2003

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The document suggests how services that address young children's needs might be fully integrated into a national multisectoral HIV/AIDS programme. It gives advice on developing national ECD policies, programmes and interventions, multisectoral ECD approaches, and ways to advocate, implement, monitor and evaluate these efforts. It makes suggestions of interventions for very young children and is a resource for other national HIV/AIDS programme topics

Building blocks : Africa-wide briefing notes. Resources for communities working with orphans and vulnerable children

INTERNATIONAL HIV/AIDS ALLIANCE
January 2003

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A set of eight booklets designed to support programme design and practice at the community level around children made vulnerable or orphaned by HIV or AIDS in Africa. The resources are all locally adaptable and are based on the experience of Alliance, its partners and other organisations. The booklets are called "Overview"; "Psychosocial support"; "Health and nutrition"; "Economic strengthening"; "Education"; "Social inclusion"; "Older Carers"; and "Young children and HIV"

Memory boxes and the psycho-social needs of children : trainer's manual

SINOMLANDO
2003

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This manual describes a training curriculum designed to give community workers and volunteers a basic understanding of the psychosocial needs of vulnerable children, and basic skills in 'memory box' methodology. It is based on a four-day, twelve-session workshop and covers child development, bereavement, loss, stigma, counselling skills and making memory boxes

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