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WCPT report : the role of physical therapists in disaster management.

SKELTON, Peter
SYKES, Catherine
et al
March 2016

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This report has two main aims: to highlight the need for physical therapist involvement in disaster management and particularly in Emergency Medical Teams (EMTs); and to brief physical therapists who want to work in the field, and national and international agencies who are already working in the field. Following an introduction to the topic of disasters, the paper outlines in separate sections the three phases of disaster management most relevant to physical therapists: preparedness; response; and recovery. Each section includes information on the role of physical therapists and details guidelines and resources to support practice in disaster management. Case studies include: Nepal, 2015 April earthquake; 2011- great East Japan earthquake; integration of rehabilitation professionals into the UK Emergency Medical Team; Nepal, 2011 onwards; Phillipines, typhoon Sendong, 2011;  Phillipines, typhoon Haiyan, November 2013; Haiti, 2011- physical therapy in post-earthquake recovery and reconstruction; Pakistan, earthquake Oct 2005; Phillipines, typhoon Bopha 2012-2013.

The 2030 agenda : the inclusion of people with disabilities : introductory toolkit

INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY ALLIANCE (IDA)
INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY AND DEVELOPMENT CONSORTIUM (IDDC)
2016

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This toolkit provides a general overview of the 2030 Agenda and focuses on practical examples on how to participate in the national implementation of the SDGs

 

​Note: this resource is available in MS PowerPoint, Adobe PDF and text only in MS Word from the link above

The 2030 agenda : the inclusion of people with disabilities : comprehensive guide

INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY ALLIANCE (IDA)
INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY AND DEVELOPMENT CONSORTIUM (IDDC)
2016

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This resource is an in-depth document that provides a comprehensive guide on all of the sections of the 2030 Agenda and how they relate to disability and people with disabilities. The guide begins by presenting the references in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to disability and inclusion, and analysing the background of the SDGs and links to teh UNCRPD.and other international movements involving people with disabilities. This further reinforces that inclusion of people with disabilities is not only an international obligation, but also a necessity if the SDG targets are to be met. Once this is established, the guide outlines a number of suggestions to ensure that people with disabilities are included in the SDG processes, including the high level political forum

 

Note: this resource is available in MS PowerPoint, Adobe PDF and text only in MS Word from the link above

 

Disability framework : one year on : leaving no one behind

DEPARTMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (DFID)
December 2015

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“The DFID vision is a world where no one is left behind. A world where people with disabilities have a voice, choice and control over the decisions that affect them. Where they participate in and benefit equitably from everyday life, everywhere. Our first Disability Framework was launched in December 2014. It focused on inspiring their colleagues to do more, with support from civil society partners…This updated Framework reflects lessons they have learned over the past year and outlines the next steps we will take as an organisation to deliver their vision”

Transforming our world : the 2030 agenda for sustainable development

UNITED NATIONS (UN)
October 2015

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This document presents the finalised text for adoption of the UN’s 2015-2030 Sustainable Development agenda, a plan of action for people, planet and prosperity.  The Agenda seeks to strengthen universal peace in larger freedom and recognises that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, is the greatest global challenge and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development. It calls for countries and all stakeholders, acting in collaborative partnership, to implement this plan and  pledges that no one will be left behind. It seeks to build on the Millennium Development Goals and complete what these did not achieve, and it is anticipated that the Goals and targets will stimulate action over the next fifteen years in areas of critical importance for humanity and the planet

 

The document provides an introduction and vision, shared principles and commitments, the world today and the new agenda, the means of implementation, the follow up and review, and a call for action to change our world. It then specifically outlines the new agenda of 17 sustainable development goals (SDGs) and the associated 169 developmental targets, the means of implementation and global partnership, and the expected follow-up and review over the next 15 years at national, regional and global levels

 

The 17 SDGs include: 

  • Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
  • Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
  • Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
  • Goal 4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all
  • Goal 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
  • Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
  • Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
  • Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
  • Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation
  • Goal 10. Reduce inequality within and among countries
  • Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
  • Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
  • Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
  • Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
  • Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
  • Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
  • Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development

Disability inclusion in the voter registration process : the challenges, lessons learned and good practices : a pathway of disability inclusion in political rights

CAMBODIAN DISABLED PEOPLE’S ORGANIZATION
August 2015

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“This research report represents the importance of barriers and good practices of disability inclusion in the voter registration process in Cambodia. It outlines a pathway in which government and civil society can work together to break down the barriers faced by persons with disability in their access to voter registration”

Development for all 2015-2020 : strategy for strengthening disability-inclusive development in Australia’s aid program

AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND TRADE (DFAT)
May 2015

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The objective of Australia’s work in disability-inclusive development is to improve the quality of life of people with disabilities in developing countries by enhancing participation and empowerment of people with disabilities, reducing poverty among people with disabilities and improving equality for people with disabilities in all areas of public life. This strategy document “provides guidance for DFAT’s strategic decision making by articulating key opportunities for strengthening disability-inclusive development where DFAT can make the most difference—addressing the key challenges of disability-inclusive development in the Indo-Pacific, using Australia’s expertise, and aligning our efforts with the priorities of Australia’s aid program. For external stakeholders, this strategy is a non-binding public articulation of the Australian Government’s continued commitment to disability-inclusive development and highlights our approach, principles and priorities”

 

Dialogues on sustainable development : a disability-inclusive perspective

KEOGH Mary
2015

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“This publication, with contributions from civil society, UN agencies and EU institutions as well as disability and development organisations…highlights the many commonalities between disability-inclusive development and a range of overarching development themes. It is structured around the three basic elements of sustainable development – economic, social and environmental sustainability – and discusses a range of sub topics relevant to these areas” 

 

Note: easy-to-read version is provided as a related resource link

Making sure people with disabilities everywhere can have a better future

CHRISTOFFEL BLINDENMISSION (CBM)
2015

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“This easy-to-read version outlines countries’ development plans looking at how all people in the world can have a better life. The plans involve jobs and money, having a say, women and girls, making cities easier to live in, being clean and safe, coping when big problems happen and having access to information. A case study is also provided

The EU stresses the need for inclusive disaster risk management

EUROPEAN COMMISSION (EC)
January 2015

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The article presents information about the Latvian Presidency of the Council of the European Union highlighting the need for stronger measures to guarantee the inclusion of people with disabilities in disaster risk management activities across the 28 EU member states

The inclusion of persons with disabilities in financing for development

INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY AND DEVELOPMENT CONSORTIUM (IDDC)
INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY ALLIANCE (IDA)
December 2014

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This policy paper concerns the inclusion of persons with disabilities in financing for development. The paper presents a number of recommendations aimed at increasing inclusion in this area and provides detailed information on background information that leads to these recommendations

The way forward on victim assistance : a consideration of the various aspects at play when integrating assistance to survivors into disability-inclusive development

HOTTENTOT, Elke
et al
August 2014

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This paper outlines specific elements when considering victim assistance in light of the CRPD and disability-inclusive development. It highlights the rights of survivors by ensuring improvement in their quality of life and transforming societies into being more inclusive of their diverse members, including survivors and other people with disabilities and families of casualties

The future framework for disaster risk reduction : a guide for decision makers

KELLETT, Jan
et al
June 2014

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“This guide to the future framework for disaster risk reduction (DRR) is intended for decision-makers, particularly those in government responsible for contributing to the new agreement. The guide is organised into a set of modules, each representing important aspects of the successor to the existing Hyogo Framework for Action (HFA). By presenting evidence in the form of data, facts and summary messages, the modules [in this report] highlight what should be covered by a new agreement. There are seven modules: Making the case, The architecture, Financing, Vulnerability, and inclusion, Climate change, Conflict and fragility,  Stakeholders and leadership”

Towards the post-2105 framework for disaster risk reduction (HFA2) : women as a force in resilience building, gender equality in disaster risk reduction

PREVENTION WEB
April 2014

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This paper argues that gender integration and women’s empowerment need to be approached within the paradigm shift in disaster risk reduction (DRR) thinking internationally, as embodied by the development of the post-2015 Framework on Disaster Risk Reduction. The paper outlines the background to the previous international framework, the Hyogo Framework for Action, and why women's integration should be an important priority for any further agreement. The paper then discusses the role and importance of women in DRR, and analyses lessons learned from the Hyogo Framework's implementation. Finally, the authors conclude by presenting a 'way forward' for increasing the inclusion of women in DRR, based on empowerment, data desegregation and local, national and international frameworks

Victim assistance factsheets

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
2014

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The factsheets were developed by Handicap International (HI) as a tool to provide concise information on what victim assistance (VA) is and on how to translate it into concrete actions that have the potential to improve the quality of life of mine/ERW victims and persons with disabilities. The factsheets target States Parties affected by mine/ERW, States Parties in a position to provide assistance, as well as organizations of survivors and other PwD, and other civil society - and international organizations.

 

This package consists of 12 factsheets. Six focus on a specific sector or public policy area that VA is an integral part of and the remaining six are dedicated to cross-cutting issues. With a view to promote synergies between different frameworks, each factsheet makes clear links with development sectors and issues.

 

The 12 topics include: Medical care, Rehabilitation, Psychological & psycho-social support, Education, Social inclusion, Economic inclusion, Gender, Empowerment, Accessibility & Access to services, Data collection, National Action Plans, Coordination, and International Cooperation and assistance

Applied research on disability in Africa : general mapping

INTERNATIONAL FOUNDATION OF APPLIED DISABILITY RESEARCH (FIRAH)
2014

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“The goal of this literary review is to report on existing knowledge about applied research on the African continent, regarding the living conditions of people with disabilities, poverty, violence and sexual abuse especially regarding children and women with disabilities, community-based rehabilitation and employment”

Mainstreaming disability in the development agenda : towards 2015 and beyond|Report of the Secretary-General

UNITED NATIONS ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COUNCIL
November 2012

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"The report presents selected examples of advances made at the international, regional and national levels in mainstreaming disability in evolving policy frameworks for inclusive development. The report concludes that, in order to advance such policy frameworks further, follow-up strategies must be introduced at all levels and suggests elements for inclusion in such strategies. The report provides specific recommendations on action at the national, regional and global level to promote the effective implementation of the outcome of the High-level Meeting, specifying actions for Member States, the United Nations system, civil society and all other stakeholders"
E/CN.5/2013/9

Incheon strategy to "make the right real" for the persons with disabilities in Asia and the Pacific

UNITED NATIONS ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COMMISSION FOR ASIA AND THE PACIFIC (ESCAP)
November 2012

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"This report presents information about 'The Incheon Strategy' which provides the Asian and Pacific region, and the world, with the first set of regionally agreed disability-inclusive development goals. Developed over more than two years of consultations with governments and civil society stakeholders, the Incheon Strategy comprises 10 goals, 27 targets and 62 indicators. The Incheon Strategy builds on the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the Biwako Millennium Framework for Action and Biwako Plus Five towards an Inclusive, Barrier-free and Rights-based Society for Persons with Disabilities in Asia and the Pacific. The Incheon Strategy will enable the Asian and Pacific region to track progress towards improving the quality of life, and the fulfillment of the rights, of the region’s 650 million persons with disabilities, most of whom live in poverty"
ST/ESCAP/2648

Realising the future we want for all : report to the secretary-general

UNITED NATIONS SYSTEM TASK TEAM
June 2012

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"The report begins by reflecting on the experience of the UN system in supporting the implementation of the MDG framework. Building on the lessons learned, the report provides an assessment of the key development challenges to which the global development agenda should respond. It proposes a vision of people-centred, inclusive and sustainable development and initial ideas for possible contours of a post-2015 UN development agenda. It concludes by laying out a possible road map for the process of defining the agenda, including ways of bringing different voices of people around the world into the consultations"

After the millennium development goals

SAVE THE CHILDREN
April 2012

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This paper highlights Save the Children’s focus on ensuring that the post-2015 framework accounts for the needs and rights of all children. The paper presents some of the current questions and options being debated, reflects on the organisation’s experience with the MDGs and then outlines six essential criteria for any new development framework. This criteria includes attention to equity, participation, protection, accountability and sustainability, as well as clear roles and responsibilities for all actors, including the private sector

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