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Cochrane Rehabilitation Methodology Committee: an international survey of priorities for future work

LEVACK, William
et al
October 2017

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Cochrane Rehabilitation aims to improve the application of evidence-based practice in rehabilitation. It also aims to support Cochrane in the production of reliable, clinically meaningful syntheses of evidence related to the practice of rehabilitation, while accommodating the many methodological challenges facing the field. To this end, Cochrane Rehabilitation established a Methodology Committee to examine, explore and find solutions for the methodological challenges related to evidence synthesis and knowledge translation in rehabilitation. An international online survey was conducted via Cochrane Rehabilitation networks to canvass opinions regarding the future work priorities for this committee and to seek information on people’s current capabilities to assist with this work. One of the areas of debate concerned whether and how work on the application of Cochrane methods in low and middle income countries should be prioritised.

 

Eur J Phys Rehabil Med 2017;53:814-7

DOI: 10.23736/S1973-9087.17.04958-9

Cluster Munition Monitor 2017

INTERNATIONAL CAMPAIGN TO BAN LANDMINES – CLUSTER MUNITION COALITION (ICBL-CMC)
August 2017

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Cluster Munition Monitor covers cluster munition ban policy, use, production, transfers, and stockpiling in every country in the world, and also contains information on cluster munition contamination and clearance activities, as well as casualties and victim assistance. Its principal frame of reference is the Convention on Cluster Munitions, although other relevant international law is reviewed, including the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. The report focuses on calendar year 2016, with information included into July 2017 where possible. Sections are: cluster munition ban policy; contamination and clearance; casualties; victim assistance; and status of the convention

 

Evaluation of disability-inclusive development at UNDP

INDEPENDENT EVALUATION OFFICE OF THE UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM
March 2017

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The Independent Evaluation Office (IEO) presents its evaluation of disability-inclusive development at the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). This work was carried out in 2016 and analyses UNDP’s contribution to disability-inclusive development during the period 2008-2016, which corresponds to the current and past UNDP strategic plans, and to the period within which the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities has been in force. The work of UNDP was considered through the four key principles of the CRPD, namely nondiscrimination, participation and inclusion, accessibility and accountability. Eleven country office visits were made and 337 people interviewed. Key findings (24) are provided, conclusions made and future strategic planning put forward.

 

Report available in summary (32 p) or in full. Video also available (51 min).

WCPT report : the role of physical therapists in disaster management.

SKELTON, Peter
SYKES, Catherine
et al
March 2016

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This report has two main aims: to highlight the need for physical therapist involvement in disaster management and particularly in Emergency Medical Teams (EMTs); and to brief physical therapists who want to work in the field, and national and international agencies who are already working in the field. Following an introduction to the topic of disasters, the paper outlines in separate sections the three phases of disaster management most relevant to physical therapists: preparedness; response; and recovery. Each section includes information on the role of physical therapists and details guidelines and resources to support practice in disaster management. Case studies include: Nepal, 2015 April earthquake; 2011- great East Japan earthquake; integration of rehabilitation professionals into the UK Emergency Medical Team; Nepal, 2011 onwards; Phillipines, typhoon Sendong, 2011;  Phillipines, typhoon Haiyan, November 2013; Haiti, 2011- physical therapy in post-earthquake recovery and reconstruction; Pakistan, earthquake Oct 2005; Phillipines, typhoon Bopha 2012-2013.

The 2030 agenda : the inclusion of people with disabilities : comprehensive guide

INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY ALLIANCE (IDA)
INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY AND DEVELOPMENT CONSORTIUM (IDDC)
2016

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This resource is an in-depth document that provides a comprehensive guide on all of the sections of the 2030 Agenda and how they relate to disability and people with disabilities. The guide begins by presenting the references in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) to disability and inclusion, and analysing the background of the SDGs and links to teh UNCRPD.and other international movements involving people with disabilities. This further reinforces that inclusion of people with disabilities is not only an international obligation, but also a necessity if the SDG targets are to be met. Once this is established, the guide outlines a number of suggestions to ensure that people with disabilities are included in the SDG processes, including the high level political forum

 

Note: this resource is available in MS PowerPoint, Adobe PDF and text only in MS Word from the link above

 

The 2030 agenda : the inclusion of people with disabilities : introductory toolkit

INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY ALLIANCE (IDA)
INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY AND DEVELOPMENT CONSORTIUM (IDDC)
2016

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This toolkit provides a general overview of the 2030 Agenda and focuses on practical examples on how to participate in the national implementation of the SDGs

 

​Note: this resource is available in MS PowerPoint, Adobe PDF and text only in MS Word from the link above

Disability framework : one year on : leaving no one behind

DEPARTMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (DFID)
December 2015

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“The DFID vision is a world where no one is left behind. A world where people with disabilities have a voice, choice and control over the decisions that affect them. Where they participate in and benefit equitably from everyday life, everywhere. Our first Disability Framework was launched in December 2014. It focused on inspiring their colleagues to do more, with support from civil society partners…This updated Framework reflects lessons they have learned over the past year and outlines the next steps we will take as an organisation to deliver their vision”

Transforming our world : the 2030 agenda for sustainable development

UNITED NATIONS (UN)
October 2015

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This document presents the finalised text for adoption of the UN’s 2015-2030 Sustainable Development agenda, a plan of action for people, planet and prosperity.  The Agenda seeks to strengthen universal peace in larger freedom and recognises that eradicating poverty in all its forms and dimensions, including extreme poverty, is the greatest global challenge and an indispensable requirement for sustainable development. It calls for countries and all stakeholders, acting in collaborative partnership, to implement this plan and  pledges that no one will be left behind. It seeks to build on the Millennium Development Goals and complete what these did not achieve, and it is anticipated that the Goals and targets will stimulate action over the next fifteen years in areas of critical importance for humanity and the planet

 

The document provides an introduction and vision, shared principles and commitments, the world today and the new agenda, the means of implementation, the follow up and review, and a call for action to change our world. It then specifically outlines the new agenda of 17 sustainable development goals (SDGs) and the associated 169 developmental targets, the means of implementation and global partnership, and the expected follow-up and review over the next 15 years at national, regional and global levels

 

The 17 SDGs include: 

  • Goal 1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
  • Goal 2. End hunger, achieve food security and improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture
  • Goal 3. Ensure healthy lives and promote well-being for all at all ages
  • Goal 4. Ensure inclusive and equitable quality education and promote lifelong learning opportunities for all
  • Goal 5. Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls
  • Goal 6. Ensure availability and sustainable management of water and sanitation for all
  • Goal 7. Ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all
  • Goal 8. Promote sustained, inclusive and sustainable economic growth, full and productive employment and decent work for all
  • Goal 9. Build resilient infrastructure, promote inclusive and sustainable industrialization and foster innovation
  • Goal 10. Reduce inequality within and among countries
  • Goal 11. Make cities and human settlements inclusive, safe, resilient and sustainable
  • Goal 12. Ensure sustainable consumption and production patterns
  • Goal 13. Take urgent action to combat climate change and its impacts
  • Goal 14. Conserve and sustainably use the oceans, seas and marine resources for sustainable development
  • Goal 15. Protect, restore and promote sustainable use of terrestrial ecosystems, sustainably manage forests, combat desertification, and halt and reverse land degradation and halt biodiversity loss
  • Goal 16. Promote peaceful and inclusive societies for sustainable development, provide access to justice for all and build effective, accountable and inclusive institutions at all levels
  • Goal 17. Strengthen the means of implementation and revitalize the global partnership for sustainable development

Leave no one behind : the real bottom billion

BHATKAL, Tanvi
SAMMAN, Emma
STUART, Elizabeth
September 2015

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"This paper sets out why the ‘leave no one behind’ agenda should be a key priority (i) in implementing the SDGs in all countries and (ii) in assessing whether or not governments have met them. It underlines how deeply entrenched marginalisation is, how vulnerabilities often overlap to amplify multiple disadvantages, and just how little we know about some groups that are likely to be deprived"

Disability inclusion in the voter registration process : the challenges, lessons learned and good practices : a pathway of disability inclusion in political rights

CAMBODIAN DISABLED PEOPLE’S ORGANIZATION
August 2015

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“This research report represents the importance of barriers and good practices of disability inclusion in the voter registration process in Cambodia. It outlines a pathway in which government and civil society can work together to break down the barriers faced by persons with disability in their access to voter registration”

Development for all 2015-2020 : strategy for strengthening disability-inclusive development in Australia’s aid program

AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS AND TRADE (DFAT)
May 2015

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The objective of Australia’s work in disability-inclusive development is to improve the quality of life of people with disabilities in developing countries by enhancing participation and empowerment of people with disabilities, reducing poverty among people with disabilities and improving equality for people with disabilities in all areas of public life. This strategy document “provides guidance for DFAT’s strategic decision making by articulating key opportunities for strengthening disability-inclusive development where DFAT can make the most difference—addressing the key challenges of disability-inclusive development in the Indo-Pacific, using Australia’s expertise, and aligning our efforts with the priorities of Australia’s aid program. For external stakeholders, this strategy is a non-binding public articulation of the Australian Government’s continued commitment to disability-inclusive development and highlights our approach, principles and priorities”

 

World health statistics 2015

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2015

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This report contains WHO’s annual compilation of health-related data for its 194 Member States, and includes a summary of the progress made towards achieving the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and associated targets

Dialogues on sustainable development : a disability-inclusive perspective

KEOGH Mary
2015

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“This publication, with contributions from civil society, UN agencies and EU institutions as well as disability and development organisations…highlights the many commonalities between disability-inclusive development and a range of overarching development themes. It is structured around the three basic elements of sustainable development – economic, social and environmental sustainability – and discusses a range of sub topics relevant to these areas” 

 

Note: easy-to-read version is provided as a related resource link

Making sure people with disabilities everywhere can have a better future

CHRISTOFFEL BLINDENMISSION (CBM)
2015

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“This easy-to-read version outlines countries’ development plans looking at how all people in the world can have a better life. The plans involve jobs and money, having a say, women and girls, making cities easier to live in, being clean and safe, coping when big problems happen and having access to information. A case study is also provided

The EU stresses the need for inclusive disaster risk management

EUROPEAN COMMISSION (EC)
January 2015

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The article presents information about the Latvian Presidency of the Council of the European Union highlighting the need for stronger measures to guarantee the inclusion of people with disabilities in disaster risk management activities across the 28 EU member states

Sendai framework for disaster risk reduction 2015 - 2030

UNITED NATIONS OFFICE FOR DISASTER RISK REDUCTION (UNISDR)
2015

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The Sendai Framework is the UN framework/action plan governing Disaster Risk Reduction for the period 2015-2030. It "is built on elements which ensure continuity with the work done by States and other stakeholders under the (Hyogo Framework for Action 2005-2015) HFA and introduces a number of innovations as called for during the consultations and negotiations…The Sendai Framework also articulates the following: the need for improved understanding of disaster risk in all its dimensions of exposure, vulnerability and hazard characteristics; the strengthening of disaster risk governance, including national platforms; accountability for disaster risk management; preparedness to “Build Back Better”; recognition of stakeholders and their roles; mobilization of risk-sensitive investment to avoid the creation of new risk; resilience of health infrastructure, cultural heritage and work-places; strengthening of international cooperation and global partnership, and risk-informed donor policies and programs, including financial support and loans from international financial institutions. There is also clear recognition of the Global Platform for Disaster Risk Reduction and the regional platforms for disaster risk reduction as mechanisms for coherence across agendas, monitoring and periodic reviews in support of UN Governance bodies”

The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030, Third UN World Conference
Sendai, Japan
18 March 2015

Agenda 2030 : sustainable development goals (SDGs)

INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY ALLIANCE (IDA)
INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY AND DEVELOPMENT CONSORTIUM (IDDC)
2015

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An easy read introduction to the 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)​ which were adopted in September 2015 at the United Nations General Assembly

The inclusion of persons with disabilities in financing for development

INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY AND DEVELOPMENT CONSORTIUM (IDDC)
INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY ALLIANCE (IDA)
December 2014

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This policy paper concerns the inclusion of persons with disabilities in financing for development. The paper presents a number of recommendations aimed at increasing inclusion in this area and provides detailed information on background information that leads to these recommendations

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