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Understanding the mobile disability gap Insights on mobile phone access and usage by persons with disabilities in Kenya and Bangladesh

ARANDA-JAN, Clara
BOUTARD, Alizee
December 2019

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This research aims to bridge the knowledge gap and to understand the potential of mobile phones as assistive technologies (ATs) for persons with disabilities in Kenya and Bangladesh. This report presents, for the first time, an evaluation of the gap and barriers to mobile phone ownership experienced by persons with disabilities, as well as the usage patterns of four main mobile-enabled services (voice, SMS, mobile internet and mobile money) and the role of mobile phones to enable access to basic services, such as education, healthcare, transportation, employment and financial services. Finally, the report explores the characteristics of access and usability of mobile products and services along the customer journey.

Making the future of work inclusive of people with disabilities

ILO GLOBAL BUSINESS AND DISABILITY NETWORK
FUNDACION ONCE
November 2019

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This is a first exercise to connect different areas of debate, looking at the key trends of the future of work from a disability perspective and seeking to identify specific action needed in order to shape the future of work in a more disability-inclusive way.

Chapters include: Work and disability - overview of current situation; megatrends of future work and persons with disability (technological revolution, skills revolution, cultutral change, demographic change and climate change); and Roadmap for an inclusive future of work.

 

The following five key objectives for the inclusion of persons with disabilities in the future of work have been identified:

1. New forms of employment and employment relations integrate disability inclusion

2. Skills development and life-long learning made inclusive of persons with disabilities

3. Universal Design embedded in development of all new infrastructure, products and services

4. Assistive technologies, existing and newly developed, to be made affordable and available

5. Measures to include persons with disabilities in growing and developing areas of the economy

 

Governments, companies, disability NGOs, trade unions and academia must be encouraged to commit and contribute towards achieving these objectives through different actions. An inclusive future of work can be reached through coordination and alliances among the different stakeholders

Water, sanitation and hygiene innovation catalogue: A collection of innovations for the humanitarian sector

ELRHA
2019

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This catalogue is a collection of some of the most promising new solutions in WASH, offering the WASH practitioner community a unique opportunity to access over 30 innovations that could help to solve their most pressing problems. Innovations in hygiene, safe water, sanitation, surface water dressing and cross-cutting issues are reported. A small number (3) specifically mention people with disabilities.

Expanding employment success for people with disabilities

FRUCHTERMAN, Jim
MELLEA, Joan
November 2018

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This report’s observations and recommendations were based on over fifty conversations with employers, technology vendors, disability experts—who were mainly people with disabilities, and technology experts, especially in artificial intelligence. It concentrates on human capital management (HCM) technology products used for attracting talent to companies, the actual interviewing/hiring process, and retention of employees once hired. Efforts on the market share leaders in each segment. 

Recommendations made concern:

  • Embracing artificial intelligence.
  • Boosting accessibility and accommodations.
  • Collecting and using data to inform action.
  • Guiding employers on the path from compliance to opportunity

Global Disability Summit 2018 - Summary of commitments

August 2018

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The key objective of the Global Disability Summit was to deliver ambitious new global and national level commitments on disability inclusion. National governments and other organisations made 170 sets of commitments around the four central themes of the Summit (ensuring dignity and respect for all, inclusive education, routes to economic empowerment and harnessing technology and innovation), as well as the two cross-cutting themes (women and girls with disabilities and conflict and humanitarian contexts), and data disaggregation.

 

Commitments made can be viewed in full on: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/global-disability-summit-commitments

 

Global Disability Summit - commitments

August 2018

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A major outcome of the Global Disability Summit, July 2018, was the commitments of a large number of organisations to achieve the rights of people with disabilities in developing countires.

The commitments of each organisation are provided in the same format and are categorised by summit theme:

  1. Dignity and respect for all
  2. Inclusive Education
  3. Economic Empowerment
  4. Harnessing Technology and Innovation

Organisations making commitments are grouped in the following categories:

  • National Governments
  • Multilateral organisations
  • Private Sector organisations
  • Foundations
  • Civil society organisations
  • Research organisations
  • Other organisations

 

The disability data portal

July 2018

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The Disability Data Portal provides a snapshot of the data globally available on people with disabilities in 40 countries. The portal also identifies where there are gaps in the current body of data. 

The portal was designed for the Global Disability Summit, held on 24 July 2018, and focusses on data relating to four thematic areas: inclusive education, stigma and discrimination, technology and innovation, and economic empowerment. 

The portal presents key development indicators relevant to the Summit themes, mostly drawn from the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), along with others relevant to the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)

Mobile technology and inclusion of persons with disabilities

THOMPSON, Stephen
May 2018

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This K4D Emerging Issues report highlights research and emerging evidence that show how mobile-enabled services can help increase inclusion of persons with disabilities. The aim is to provide UK Government’s Department for International Development (DFID) policy-makers with the information required to inform policies that are more resilient to the future. This report provides a synthesis of the current evidence on how mobile technology and mobile-enabled services can help increase inclusion of persons with disabilities. It was originally planned that this report would also explore how mobile enabled technology might exacerbate existing inequalities. Some evidence was found to focus on the barriers to ICT that marginalised groups encounter, however, no evidence was found to focus on how mobile technology might exacerbate inequalities. As such, the report focuses on the positive impact that mobile technology has been shown to have in increasing the inclusion of persons with disabilities. 

This report focuses specifically on evidence produced by academic research from low and middle income countries

Smarter, greener, more inclusive? Indicators to support the Europe 2020 strategy. 2017 edition

EUROSTAT
July 2017

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The focus of this publication is on showing progress of the EU and its Member States towards the goals and targets defined in the Europe 2020 strategy. The analysis of long-term trends, as described by the strategy’s headline indicators, is accompanied by additional contextual information, which improves understanding of the driving forces behind the developments that these indicators show. The current edition builds upon and updates the previous releases. The publication provides analyses based on the most recent statistics in the five thematic areas of employment, R&D and innovation, climate change and energy, education, and poverty and social exclusion. Each area is analysed in a dedicated chapter. An executive summary outlines the main statistical trends observed in the indicators. Additional country profiles describe the progress of each Member State towards its national Europe 2020 targets

DOI: 10.2785/760192

Directive on accessibility of the websites and mobile applications of public sector bodies : Toolkit

EUROPEAN DISABILITY FORUM
May 2017

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The European Union (EU) Directive on accessibility of the websites and mobile applications of public sector bodies was adopted on 26 October 2016. EU Member States will have until September 2018 to transpose this EU legislation into national law. This toolkit aims to provide key information about this EU legislation and advice for the transposition phase. Section 1 provides a timeline for transposition and implementation of the Directive, some key definitions, identification of key players and an explanation of the directive being a ‘minimum harmonisation’ Directive. Section 2 provides understanding of what the Directive covers, explains key provisions (scope, accessibility requirements, exemptions, enforcement, monitoring, etc.) and gives advice to DPOs (disabled people's organisations) concerning what they can do at national level to ensure the best possible implementation for persons with disabilities in their country

Leaving no-one behind: using assistive technology to enhance community living for people with intellectual disability

OWUOR, John
LARKIN, Fiona
MacLACHLAN, Malcolm
April 2017

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The transformation of community care for people with intellectual disabilities (ID) through enhanced access to assistive technology (AT) is discussed. The problems associated with lack of access to AT and the extent to which these occur are reported. Issues in lack of AT provision, including lack of global standards, are discussed. A call to action is made with reference to the appropriate parts of CRPD.   

 

 

Disability and Rehabilitation: Assistive Technology, 12:5, 426-428

DOI: 10.1080/17483107.2017.1312572 

Pilot testing of 3D printing technology for transtibial prosthesis in complex contexts (Togo, Madagascar and Syria)

CONICAVE, Jerome
TAN, Daniele
2017

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In January-October 2016, Handicap International carried out a pilot testing of 3D printing technology for transtibial prosthesis in Togo, Madagascar and Syria. The aim of the study was to explore and test how physical rehabilitation services can be more accessible to people living in complex contexts via innovative technologies (such as 3D printing, treatment processes that use Internet technology and tools) and decentralised services by bringing them closer to the patients. This scientific summary provides the context, the objectives, the methodology, the results of the study, and perspectives for the future.

A number of technical appendices are available

RS/05

The promise and the reality: a mental health workforce perspective on technology-enhanced youth mental health service delivery

ORLOWSKI, Simone
LAWN, Sharon
MATTHEWS, Ben
et al
October 2016

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Digital technologies show promise for reversing poor engagement of youth (16–24 years) with mental health services. In particular, mobile and internet based applications with communication capabilities can augment face-to-face mental health service provision. Results of in-depth qualitative data drawn from various stakeholders involved in provision of youth mental health services in one Australian rural region are described. Data were obtained using focus groups and semi-structured interviews with regional youth mental health clinicians, youth workers and support/management staff and analysed via inductive thematic analysis. Six main themes were identified: young people in a digital age, personal connection, power and vulnerability, professional identity, individual factors and organisational legitimacy. 

 

DOI: 10.1186/s12913-016-1790-y

United Nations Global Sustainable Development Report 2016

Uinted Nations, Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UNDESA)
July 2016

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This report was prepared to inform the discussions at the high-level political forum (HLPF) on sustainable development in 2016. The theme chosen for the HLPF is "ensuring that no one is left behind". The report builds on GSDR2014 and GSDR2015. The approach is of an assessment of assessments, documenting and describing the landscape of information on specific issues or nexuses of issues. Specifically, the report keeps the ‘science-policy interface’ and ‘SDGs as integrated system’ as main threads. Main topics include: ensuring that no one is left behind and the 2030 Agenda; the infrastructure – inequality – resilience nexus; perspectives of scientists on technology and the SDGs; inclusive institutions for sustainable development; and identification of emerging Issues for sustainable development. An annex addresses persons with disabilities specifically, highlighting their over-representation in the "furthest behind".

Google & Motivation collaboration

MOTIVATION
April 2016

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A 24 month collaboration between Google.org and Motivation to develop and test a model for using 3D printing to create customised postural support devices to enable wheelchairs to be adapted and fitted to the unique needs of the wheelchair user is announced. An integral part of the project is the piloting of a ‘Print Pod’ overseas, which will act as a temporary wheelchair clinic, kitted out with a 3D printer and raw material.

Interrogating the impact of scientific and technological development on disabled children in India and beyond

WOLBRING, Gregor
GHAI, Anita
2015

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The authors “focus for this paper on two classes of emerging products; one being social robots and the other being products that are envisioned to increase the cognitive abilities of humans beyond the species-typical and their impact on aspects of childhood such as education and self-identity formation. [They] analyse the utility and impact of these two classes of products through the lens of the alternative report on India to the Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) Committee on the Rights of Children authored by the by National Disability Network of India and the lens of ability expectations. [They] posit that the discourses around these two classes of emerging products do not address the problems the alternative report raises, but could heighten the problems identified by the report. [They] believe the two classes of products highlight the need for ability expectation governance”

 

Disability and the Global South, Vol.2, No. 2

Mobile for development : transforming global healthcare through mobile technology

THEVATHASAN, Vanessa
GRADZEWICZ, Agnes
RUETZEL, Sonja
2015

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This paper outlines the need for greater connectivity & accessibility in less developed countries. Following this, the authors present the benefits of various different ‘mHealth’ solutions, presented through case studies. The report concludes by outlining some of the constraints holding back greater ‘mHealth’ innovation, including financing and sustainability issues

Including people with disabilities in emergency relief efforts

OOSTERHOFF, Pauline
KETT, Maria
November 2014

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This issue focuses on the inclusion of people with disabilities in emergency relief efforts and concludes that “more must be done to ensure the needs and rights of people with disabilities are fully recognised in disaster risk reduction and emergency responses. Accelerating progress will require inclusive humanitarian programming and the use of technological solutions to be effectively promoted and incentivised, and people with disabilities and their organisations to be involved from the outset in the design and implementation of policies and programmes”

IDS Rapid Response Briefing 8

Where can design have the greatest impact in the next five years?

CASEY, Valerie
Ed
April 2014

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This special 100th journal issue focuses on women, design and social impact. The concept of "Design for all" is that the starting point should be the needs of people with activity limitation, such as physical, sensory and mental or cognitive limitation, and spaces, buildings and products should be designed to be accessible to all without losing the aesthetic or adding to cost.

The Journal contains 10 short essays by designers addressing issues such as: the need to assess the requirements of users first; exploring the political and social aspects of design; the responsibilities of designers; design as a problem solving tool;design to improve the lives of the poorest; sustainability; development; technology; and the environment

Design For All Journal​, Vol 9, No 4 

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