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Health information-seeking behaviour of visually impaired persons in Ibadan Metropolis, Nigeria

SALAMI, Karibou
January 2018

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Persons living with visual impairments form a major group of people with various types of impairments in African countries. Little has been reported about the means and forms of information they seek to cope with their environment, and studies in Nigeria specifically, have not explored health information-seeking behaviour of visually impaired persons. This paper documents the health information-seeking behaviour of visually impaired persons (VIPs) in Ibadan Metropolis. A standardized questionnaire was administered to 200 VIPs sampled from two health facilities in Ibadan Metropolis. Most (66%) of the VIPs were partially sighted, 43% reported health issues as their most worrying challenge, while 20% reportedly had daily unmet health information needs. VIPs accessed information about medication for ailments from friends (45%), adopted herbal medication (50.5%) and /or indulged in selfmedication (21%). They reportedly had worse health (9.5%) status, while 4.5% reportedly remained worse off emotionally

 

Disability and the Global South, 2018 Vol.5, No. 1, 1252-1272

Childhood disability in Malaysia: a study of knowledge, attitudes and practices

MOORE, Katie
BEDFORD, Juliet
November 2017

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This study was carried out to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of society towards children with disabilities, the children themselves, and their peers in Malaysia. The study took place in Selangor, Kelantan, Sabah and Sarawak. There were 756 total respondents/participants including government ministries, community members, service providers, care givers and children and adolescents both with and without disabilities. 

Best Practice Guides for professionals supporting autistic students in Higher Education. Guide 3: For professionals supporting autistic students within or outside HE Institutions

FABRI, Marc
ANDREWS, Penny
PUKI, Heta
March 2016

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This guide is for specialists directly supporting autistic students. This may be as part of a disability support team within a Higher Education Institution (HEI), or for an independent organisation that provides services to HE. Insights from research and from good practice across Europe are shared to help improve student experiences and engagement with information and services, and to develop expertise.

Right to information for people with disability

Sakshi Trust
ActionAid India
2006

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This is a guide for people wanting to access information under India's Right to Information Act (2005) in the context of disability. It has been designed for use by NGOs, parents of disabled children, care givers, students or anyone concerned with disability. It contains a detailed background on the different benefits that a disabled person is entitled to from the government. The main topics covered are disability certification, education, employment, public access, poverty alleviation schemes, assistive devices and complaint process and as such will be useful to any one seeking general information as well. A list of pre-formatted draft applications for people seeking information from any State or central office is included

World disasters report 2005 : focus on information in disasters [summary]

INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION ON RED CROSS AND RED CRESCENT SOCIETIES (IFRCS)
2005

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This report considers the quality of communication between aid givers and receivers, and what impact this has on vulnerable people. The report examines how information is handled before, during and after disasters. It analyses thematic issues such as consulting with affected people, assessing needs, mapping risks and sharing information. It looks at the role of both local and international media, and the impact of information and communication technology on humanitarian relief. The report calls on agencies to focus less on gathering information for their own needs and more on exchanging information with the people they seek to support

World youth report 2003 : the global situation of young people

UNITED NATIONS. Department for Economic and Social Affairs
Ed
2004

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Overall, young people today are better off than previous generations, but many are still severely hindered by a lack of education, poverty, health risks, unemployment and the impact of conflict. The World Youth Report 2003 provides an overview of the global situation of young people. The first ten chapters focus on the priority areas of education, employment, extreme poverty, health issues, the environment, drugs, delinquency, leisure time, the situation of girls and young women, and youth participation in decision-making as identified by the World Programme of Action for Youth (WPAY) adopted by the General Assembly in 1995. The remaining five chapters address some of the newer issues that were later identified as additional priorities for youth and were adopted by the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) in 2003

Building information systems in health care : a reference guide for health care decision-makers

PESTIC, Ozren
2004

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This manual aims to introduce the reader to the subject of medical informatics - specifically how to build information systems in various health care settings. Although some parts of the manual present detailed knowledge of specific applications tailored to technical specialists, the overall purpose is to provide those involved in the development of information systems with a framework that will assist in the planning and design process

Making information user-driven

LLOYD-LANEY, Megan
March 2003

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This brief document describes the issues and priorities involved in making information accessible. It explains that tailoring information to suit your audience increases the likelihood that your information will be accessed and taken up. To provide user-driven information it is important to understand who your target audience is, what information they want/need, how they access information and whether you are trying to inform or influence your audience. With this knowledge you can provide the information your target audience wants, in media they can use, and place your information where your audience will look for it. If you are clear about who has produced the information, who it is intended for and its purpose, the user can make informed decisions about the value of your information. Involving end users in research is also more likely to produce outputs that are quickly disseminated and taken up. Awareness of the strategic role of information within your organisation can be enhanced by encouraging all organisation members to become involved in identifying information needs, dissemination and community building

Information management for development organisations

POWELL, Mike
2003

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The book is about managing information in the workplace rather than in a resource centre or library. It is aimed at managers of community groups and non-governmental organisations in developing countries and elsewhere. It aims to help them to think critically about what kinds of information they, their staff, and their project partners need. It discusses how they can access such information, manage it, and communicate it in the most effective and equitable way. It includes some practical tools and exercises to help readers to relate the ideas to their own situations. In this second edition, discussions of knowledge management, capacity building, institutional learning, evaluation and impact assessment, research, information products, and evidence-based work have been added, or considerably extended, together with a number of new case studies

Resource centre manual : how to set up and manage a resource centre

O'SULLIVAN, Sheila
et al
2003

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Contains practical information on all aspects of setting up and managing a resource centre, from planning, fundraising and finding a suitable location, to collecting and organising materials, developing information services, and monitoring and evaluating the work of the resource centre. It assumes that most readers will use manual systems for organising information, but also explains how computers can be used in resource centres, including e-mail, Internet and databases. It describes how to select database software, and contains a detailed review of three leading database programs. It includes a list of organisations and publications that can provide further information

Inclusive information

PLAYFORTH, Sarah
2003

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Accessible information is important for an inclusive society and its organisations. Inclusive Information goes beyond sign language and Braille. It means that texts and publications have to be produced in an easy to understand way. Although it has been produced for the UK, it is also relevant for other countries

Using technology

POOLE, Nick
2003

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Disabled people can make use of ICT and other technologies to get access to information. They can get support through simple personal computers or special devices. Although this guide was produced for the UK, it contains some content that is relevant to a wider audience

Revisiting the "magic box" : case studies in local appropriation of information and communication technologies (ICTs)

BATCHELOR, Simon
O’FARRELL, Clare
2003

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This book looks at the way communities and groups in developing countries are appropriating information and communication technologies (ICTs) to address their needs. It finds that ICTs are being integrated into wider community-based activities and adapted to fit different contexts. It follows on from the paper "Discovering the Magic Box". It finds that there are still few examples of community-driven and locally appropriated ICT initiatives and an absence of standards or guidelines to evaluate ICT-based projects. The book includes some analytical frameworks and indicators to identify good practice and evidence of impact A significant development has been in the growth of telecommunications, in particular mobile phones, that are relatively cheap and powerful tools for poor communities, even in remote areas. The book concludes that the power of oral communication through telephones and radio cannot be underestimated. The book proposes that the main challenge is to adapt the new, usually computer-based ICTs to the needs of poor, predominantly oral-based communities so that they can be appropriated effectively and quickly

Inclusive information [large print version]

PLAYFORTH, Sarah
2003

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Accessible information is important for an inclusive society and its organisations. Inclusive Information goes beyond sign language and Braille. It means that texts and publications have to be produced in an easy to understand way. Although it has been produced for the UK, it is also relevant for other countries

Towards equity in global health knowledge

PAKENHAM-WALSH, Neil
PRIESTLY, Carol
July 2002

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Emphasizes the interdependence of global health knowledge and draw attention to inequities in the global flow of information that profoundly affect the evolution of the global knowledge base and its relevance to health priorities. Information and communication technologies have great potential to reduce these inequities, not only by disseminating information, but also by supporting such important activities as international co-operation and Southern-led development. Describes briefly some of the challenges, recent achievements, and priorities for the future

Collecting and propagating local development content : synthesis and conclusions

BALLANTYNE, Peter
May 2002

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Drawing from a consultation process to examine how local content in developing countries is created, adapted, and exchanged, this report provides some answers to these questions. It is a synthesis of lessons; the case stories which are reproduced in an accompanying report provide details on actual experienses and lessons from the ground

Children with hydrocephalus and spina bifida in East Africa : can family and community resources improve the odds?

MILES, M
2002

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Hydrocephalus and spina bifida are life threatening conditions that often result in severe dsabilities. Risks are much reduced by immediate surgery and careful managment, but neither has been available for most of the sub-Saharan African population. This paper traces the growth of solutions and some socio-cultural resources that historically have supported family and community care for children with severe disabilities, mainly in Tanzania, and nearby countries. Some community-based rehabilitation (CBR) work with children with spina bifida and hydrocephalus is described, and challenges to the CBR approach are noted from the increased survival of people with disabilities requiring complex care. More appropriate information, recognition of indigenous knowledge, enlistment of community resources and financial assistance are needed to enhance the lives of East Africans with hydrocephalus, spina bifida and other severely disabling conditions

Doing the wild thing : supporting an ordinary sexual life for people with intellectual disabilities

HAMILTON, Carol
2002

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"This article explores how some people with intellectual disabilities have sought to open up pathways towards accessing experiences of sexual expression as a way to move forward towards being able to integrate a concept of sexuality into their lives. Two support workers are interviewed...(and) their comments reveal that access to successful instances of sexual expression for people in this group are currently only available those who are articulate enough and persistent enough to keep trying until they succeed. Barriers to success are isolated and some wider issues surrounding what changes might positively affect this group are discussed"
Disability Studies Quarterly, Vol 22, No 4

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