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Starting or strengthening a drug bulletin : a practical manual

INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY OF DRUG BULLETINS
WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2005

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Access to independent and reliable drug information is key to the promotion of rational prescribing and use of medicines. Bulletins are essential tools for information dissemination and this manual aims to provide guidelines, tips and examples on how to start or improve drug bulletins. It covers all aspects of production, providing a comprehensive overview of the editorial process, the reviewing of new drugs and the design, production and distribution of the bulletin. The manual is an essential guide for anyone starting or running a drug bulletin, but may also be of interest to health professionals and others

Access to health information

SOURCE INTERNATIONAL INFORMATION SUPPORT CENTRE
2005

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This Key list highlights essential information resources on access to health information. Resources have been selected and reviewed by experts in the field. Any study of access in ICT and health should include a background analysis on digital divide issues generally; then a specific focus on access to health information delivered via ICT -- for health practitioners, researchers and for the public. ICTs present a significant tool for sharing information within various constituencies in the health sector. They also present the opportunity for health professionals in developing countries to access a wide range of medical journals online. Delivery of medical assistance via ICTs make access by the public a key issue

ICT and health [chapter] | ICT and MDGs : a World Bank Group perspective

WORLD BANK GROUP
December 2003

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This article explores the impact of ICTs on health care within developing countries. Topics covered include research and training of health-care workers, achieving health-related MDGs, and storing and disseminating health information. Details are also provided of selected World Bank-funded projects

Local capacities to create and adapt information for healthcare workers in developing countries

PAKENHAM-WALSH, Neil
July 2002

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This study is a brief but sobering analysis of the impact of ICTs and health information in the developing country environment. The author notes that despite its massive potential, the current global information explosion has had little impact on access to practical information for frontline healthcare workers in developing countries, especially those working in primary care and district hospital settings. The author notes that healthcare workers in developing countries continue to lack access to the basic information they need to learn, to diagnose, and to save lives. However, it is shown that this can be improved through access to and use of ICTs

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

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