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IASC Guidelines, Inclusion of persons with disabilities in humanitarian action

INTER-AGENCY STANDING COMMITTEE (IASC)
November 2019

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The guidelines set out essential actions that humanitarian actors must take in order to effectively identify and respond to the needs and rights of persons with disabilities who are most at risk of being left behind in humanitarian settings.

The recommended actions in each chapter place persons with disabilities at the centre of humanitarian action, both as actors and as members of affected populations. They are specific to persons with disabilities and to the context of humanitarian action and build on existing and more general standards and guidelines.

These are the first humanitarian guidelines to be developed with and by persons with disabilities and their representative organizations in association with traditional humanitarian stakeholders. Based on the outcomes of a comprehensive global and regional multi-stakeholder consultation process, they are designed to promote the implementation of quality humanitarian programmes in all contexts and across all regions, and to establish and increase both the inclusion of persons with disabilities and their meaningful participation in all decisions that concern them.

More at risk: how older people are excluded in humanitarian data

TANYANG, Gaynor
VENTURES, Lumina
2019

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This report evaluates existing policies and practices on how older people have been excluded from data in disaster preparedness and humanitarian responses in Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Indonesia, Myanmar, the Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam.

In order to evaluate existing policies and practices in the collection of inclusion data, the research employed two main methods: a review of documents and a survey. The review of documents was conducted in three stages: a global literature review, followed by a policy review and a practice review. The survey analysed the responses of 72 respondents from 10 countries .

Including children with disabilities in humanitarian action

UNICEF
July 2017

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"The purpose of Including Children with Disabilities in Humanitarian Action is to strengthen the inclusion of children and women with disabilities, and their families, in emergency preparedness, response and early recovery, and recovery and reconstruction. This series of booklets provides insight into the situation of children with disabilities in humanitarian contexts, highlights the ways in which they are excluded from humanitarian action, and offers practical actions and tips to better include children and adolescents with disabilities in all stages of humanitarian action. The booklets were created in response to UNICEF colleagues in the field expressing a need for a practical resource to guide their work. The information and recommendations are based on evidence and good practices gathered from literature and field staff experiences. The six booklets on how to include children and adolescents with disabilities in humanitarian programmes are as follows: 1) general guidance; 2) child protection; 3) education; 4) health and HIV/AIDS; 5) nutrition; 6) water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH)".

General guidance available July 2017. Others to follow.

In addition to the PDF versions in English, Arabic and French, the guidance is also available in a range of accessible formats, including EPUB, a Braille-ready file and accessible HTML formats. 

The guidance was developed in collaboration with Handicap International.

Expanding universal design process : Thailand

SAWADSRI, Antika
Ed
June 2015

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This issue of the Design for All Institute of India’s monthly newsletter higlights universal design process in Thailand. A range of topics are discussed, such as, universal design, related research, accessibility in places of worship and classrooms, and individual perspectives on accessibility from a wheelchair-user and a person with a visual impairment

Vol 10, No 6

Technical report 1 : mapping of organisations in Indonesia in disaster risk reduction [MOIDRR]

CENTRE FOR DISABILITY RESEARCH AND POLICY, University of Sydney
ARBEITER-SAMARITER-BUND INDONESIA
June 2015

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This is the first Technical Report in a three part series for the two year DFAT Australian Aid funded project (2013-2015), Promoting the Inclusion of People with Disabilities in Disaster Management in Indonesia. This report details the mapping of organisations in Indonesia working in disaster risk reduction (DRR). The two year project was concerned with understanding the gaps between disability inclusive policy and practices in DRR and supporting opportunities to include people with disabilities in all phases of disaster risk management. The premise of this work was that reducing the vulnerability of people with disability during disasters is a key strategy to promote broader community resilience

 

The direct and practical solutions that people with disability can offer to community-level DRR activities should be a key consideration within all phases of disaster risk management. Inclusion of people with disabilities in DRR before, during, and after disasters contributes to the “whole-of-community” approach to disaster resilience advocated in contemporary policy and enacted by DRR agencies. This project was initially framed within an increasing awareness of disability inclusion in DRR globally which is now articulated in the recently issued Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction 2015-2030 (UNDISR, 2015), and within an increasingly supportive policy environment in Indonesia

Technical report 3 : the disability inclusive disaster resilience (DiDR) tool : development and field-testing

CENTRE FOR DISABILITY RESEARCH AND POLICY, University of Sydney
ARBEITER-SAMARITER-BUND INDONESIA
June 2015

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This is the third Technical Report in a three part series for the two year DFAT Australian Aid funded project (2013-2015), Promoting the Inclusion of People with Disabilities in Disaster Management in Indonesia. This report details the development, refinement and field–testing of the Disability Inclusive Disaster Resilience (DiDR) tool. The purpose of the DiDR tool is to identify the resilience and capabilities of people with disabilities to natural disasters in their family and community setting. The tool is designed to be used by people with disabilities, their families or carers and thereby to promote the inclusion of people with disabilities in Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) policy making and strategy implementation. The tool assesses the resilience of people with disabilities by bringing together four components known to be fundamental to disaster risk reduction: the individual’s functioning status, their level of participation in their communities, the physical vulnerability of their place of residence, and individual risk predictors known to influence the behaviour of the general population before, during and after a natural hazard emergency. In February and March 2015, the survey teams administered the DiDR Tool by interviewing 289 people with disabilities or their carers in four Indonesian Districts affected by diverse natural hazards 

Rapid assessment of alcohol and other substance use in conflict-affected and displaced populations : a field guide

EZARD, Nadine
2008

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This guide outlines the steps for planning and conducting rapid assessments of alcohol and other substance use among conflict-affected and displaced populations. It also details information for action plans and report writing, as well as key resources and annexes with sample forms. This guide is useful for practitioners and researchers to conduct rapid assessments of alcohol and other substance use in conflict-affected and displaced populations

HIV prevention and care with especially vulnerable young people : a framework for action

AGGLETON, Peter
CHASE, Elaine
RIVERS, Kim
April 2004

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This document sets out five core principles underpinning effective HIV/AIDS prevention programming with young people: putting the young person first; promoting meaningful participation; a commitment to rights; promoting gender equity; and tackling risk and vulnerability. It also offers a straightforward guide to priority setting, with a focus on action to reduce risk, action to reduce vulnerability and action to mitigate impact. Examples of successful implementation of this framework are presented in 'HIV prevention with especially vulnerable young people: case studies of success and innovation' (2006). This is a useful resource for policy-makers, practitioners and researchers working to promote young people's sexual health in resource-constrained settings

Building information systems in health care : a reference guide for health care decision-makers

PESTIC, Ozren
2004

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This manual aims to introduce the reader to the subject of medical informatics - specifically how to build information systems in various health care settings. Although some parts of the manual present detailed knowledge of specific applications tailored to technical specialists, the overall purpose is to provide those involved in the development of information systems with a framework that will assist in the planning and design process

Community-based strategies for breastfeeding promotion and support in developing countries

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2003

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This review examines the role of communities and community-based resource persons in providing support for appropriate feeding practices and access to skilled support when mothers need it. This document is based on a literature review and an analysis of three projects in Madagascar, Honduras and India. It assesses the impact of interventions, the mechanisms through which behaviours can be changed, and the factors that are necessary to maximise and sustain the benefits of interventions

Participatory research with older people : a sourcebook

HESLOP, Mandy
March 2002

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This sourcebook takes the belief that participatory research with older people should form a key element of local and national government policy-making in areas such as health, employment and social welfare; programme planning by international aid agencies; and advocacy for and by older people. It has been produced to meet the need for a non-specialist sourcebook to help with all stages of participatory research with older people, and offers a clear overview of the whole process

Learning for change : principles and practices of learning organisations

BRITTON, Bruce
2002

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This paper describes both the theoretical side of organisational learning, and a range of practical tools and methods. The theory is based on an 'eight function model' which is integrated in the project cycle: creating a learning culture, gathering experience, accessing external learning, communication systems, mechanisms for drawing conclusions, developing an organisational memory, integrating learning into strategy and policy, and applying the learning. The tools include action learning sets, advice network mapping, case study development, exchange programmes, exit interviews, and others. The paper includes a list of further reading resources

Comprehensive participatory planning and evaluation

LEFEVRE, Pierre
et al
December 2000

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This publication aims to assist individuals and organisations in planning and evaluating interventions in a flexible, comprehensive and participatory manner. Comprehensive participatory planning and evaluation (CPPE) makes use of both casual and dynamic models and offers a high degree of participation, with increased sense of self-esteem and ownership. It is implementation-orientated and can be applied to a number of situations, including programmes and projects. This guide is clearly written, and the CPPE approach is effectively illustrated in simple steps. Covers a range of topics, including problem assessment, intervention identification, planning, setting up a monitoring and evaluation system and proposal writing. The annexes contain two case studies, practical suggestions for planning workshops and a useful checklist

Measuring the difference : guide to planning and evaluating health information outreach

BURROUGHS, Catherine M
WOOD, Fred B
September 2000

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This guide presents a programmatic and goal-orientated approach to outreach activities. The premise of this approach is that evaluation is an integral part of programme development: planning and evaluating an outreach initiative is one and the same process, and asking the right questions at the beginning is essential for getting useful results at the end. The guide is practical in purpose, with checklists, worksheets and examples, but also heavily theory-based, offering a range of methodological possibilities and strategies. The guide should be useful to community organisations, libraries, clinics or other groups seeking to affect the capacity of individuals or communities to use health information resources and to address barriers to access, through simple or complex outreach projects. It is not specifically written for developing-country contexts

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