Resources search

The impact of an inclusive education intervention on teacher preparedness to educate children with disabilities within the Lakes Region of Kenya

CAREW, Mark
DELUCCA, Marcella
GROCE, Nora
KETT, Maria
February 2018

Expand view

There has been little empirical study within low- and middle-income countries on how to effectively prepare teachers to educate children with disabilities. This paper reports on the impact of an intervention designed to increase teaching self-efficacy, improve inclusive beliefs, attitudes and practices, and reduce concerns around the inclusion of children with disabilities within the Lakes region of Kenya. A longitudinal survey was conducted with in-service teachers (matched N = 123) before and after they had participated in a comprehensive intervention programme, delivered in the field by Leonard Cheshire Disability. Results showed that the intervention increased teaching self-efficacy, produced more favourable cognitive and affective attitudes toward inclusive education, and reduced teacher concerns. However, there was little evidence regarding the impact on inclusive classroom practices. The increase in teaching self-efficacy over the intervention period was also found to predict concerns over time. Results are discussed in terms of implications for international efforts, as well as national efforts within Kenya to promote inclusive education.

International Journal of Inclusive Education, vol.23, no.3, Feb 2018
https://doi.org/10.1080/13603116.2018.1430181

Disability, CBR & Inclusive Development Vol 29, No 1 (2018): Spring 2018

2018

Expand view

Research papers in this journal issue are:

  1. Anticipated Barriers to Implementation of Community-Based Rehabilitation in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil
  2. Parental Perceptions, Attitudes and Involvement in Interventions for Autism Spectrum Disorders in Sarawak, Malaysia
  3. Utilisation and Satisfaction with Health Services among Persons with Disabilities in Accra, Ghana

 

Brief reports are:

  1. Predictors in the Selection of an AAC system: An Evidence-based Report on Overcoming Challenges
  2. Negotiating Future Uncertainty: Concerns of Mothers of Children with Down Syndrome in Kashmir, India
  3. Competencies of Students with Visual Impairment in using the White Cane in their Learning Environment: a Case Study at Wenchi Senior High in Ghana
  4. Teacher Trainees’ Perceptions of Inclusion of and its Challenges

Disability in the sustainable development goals: critical reflections. Disability & the Global South (DGS), 2017, Vol. 4 No. 1 Special issue

2017

Expand view

This special issue follows on from the symposium ‘Disability in the SDGs: Forming Alliances and Building Evidence for the 2030 Agenda’ held in London in 2016. The articles in this special issue consider the evidence base around the inclusion of people with disabilities, particularly with respect to health, poverty and education. The editorial reports that emerging evidence suggests that despite marginal changes in discourse, people with disabilities continue to be left behind in these areas, that large data gaps remain, data collected so far is not always comparable and qualitative research also remains scarce. What it means to ‘include’ and how to go about this is also discussed. Titles of papers in this issue are:

  • Entering the SDG era: What do Fijians prioritise as indicators of disability-inclusive education?
  • SDGs, Inclusive Health and the path to Universal Health Coverage
  • No One Left Behind: A review of social protection and disability at the World Bank
  • The capacity of community-based participatory research in relation to disability and the SDGs
  • Measuring Disability and Inclusion in relation to the 2030 Agenda on Sustainable Development

African university students’ perspectives on disability access

OSIFUYE, Shade
HIGBEE, Jeanne
December 2014

Expand view

Responding to the United Nations Convention on the Rights of Persons With Disabilities (CRPD), this paper reports on the results of one phase of a qualitative research study conducted at a large, public, multi-campus university in East Africa to explore the challenges faced by students with physical disabilities. Recommendations from a focus group are presented and implications for pedagogical and institutional transformation are discussed

Journal of Diversity Management, Volume 9, Number 12

Illiteracy among adults with disabilities in the developing world: A review of the literature and a call for action

GROCE, Nora
BAKHSHI, Parul
2011

Expand view

In the early 1990s, UNESCO estimated that perhaps 97% of the world's 650 million disabled persons were unable to read or write, leading to significant efforts throughout the developing world to ensure that all children with disabilities attended school through ‘inclusive education’ programmes. But what of the vast majority of persons with disabilities who now are adolescents or adults, well beyond the reach of classroom education, or the estimated 90% of disabled children who will still ‘age out’ of the system before such inclusive education is available in their communities? In this paper, we review findings from a global literature search on literacy of adults with disability in developing countries which shows that there is currently little in international development, education, health or disability research policies or programmes that addresses this issue. On the basis of these findings we argue that while inclusive education efforts for children are important, more attention also needs to be directed to providing literacy skills to illiterate and marginally literate disabled adolescents and adults.

Effective use of assistive technologies for inclusive education in developing countries : issues and challenges from two case studies

GRONLUND, Åke
LIM, Nena
LARSSON, Hannu
2010

Expand view

This article presents a study that "conducted an in-depth case study of two developing countries, Bangladesh and Tanzania, and thoroughly reviewed existing (inclusive education) IE projects around the world and other relevant literature. Three experts in the field and 18 informants of the two selected countries were interviewed in person, by phone or by email. The analysis of findings from interviews and literature review shows that obstacles to effective use of (assistive technologies) AT for IE come from three different levels - school, national, and network"
IJEDICT, Vol 6, Issue 4

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

Subscribe to updates