Resources search

Disability-themed emojis approved for use

British Broadcasting Company (BBC)
February 2019

Expand view

New accessibility-themed emojis including characters with hearing aids, wheelchairs, prosthetic limbs, white "probing" canes and guide dogs are to be introduced.

Their inclusion in 2019's official list means many smartphones should gain them in the second half of the year

Good practice guide: embedding inclusion of older people and people with disabilities in humanitarian policy and practice Lessons learnt from the ADCAP programme

AKERKAR, Supriya
BHARDWAJ, Rhea
2018

Expand view

This guide shares good practices and challenges that have emerged through the experience of the Age and Disability Capacity Programme (ADCAP) implementing partners, in embedding inclusion of older people and people with disabilities within their humanitarian policies and practices. All mainstream and specialist organisations engaged in humanitarian responses can learn and benefit from this experience. This guide complements the ‘Humanitarian inclusion standards for older people and people with disabilities’ (see Appendix 4), by documenting practices that will help humanitarian organisations to systematically include older people and people with disabilities.

Nine change themes that reflect successful inclusion practices emerging from the ADCAP experience are presented. Each theme includes analysis — using examples of action from ADCAP implementing organisations, a set of good practice action points, and case studies detailing how change was brought about in different implementing organisations

Disability & the Global South (DGS), 2018, Vol. 5 No. 2: Special issue: Intersecting indigeneity, colonisation and disability

2018

Expand view

Articles include:

  • Editorial: Intersecting Indigeneity, colonialisation and disability
  • Yuin, Kamilaroi, Sámi, and Maori people’s reflections on experiences as ‘Indigenous scholars’ in ‘Disability Studies’ and ‘Decolonisation’
  • Audiology and Speech-Language Pathology: Practitioners’ Reflections on Indigeneity, Disability and Neo-Colonial Marketing
  • ‘My granddaughter doesn’t know she has disabilities and we are not going to tell her’: Navigating Intersections of Indigenousness, Disability and Gender in Labrador
  • Disabling Bodies of/and Land: Reframing Disability Justice in Conversation with Indigenous Theory and Activism
  • The Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and its implications for the health and wellbeing of indigenous peoples with disabilities: A comparison across Australia, Mexico and New Zealand
  • Challenges in global Indigenous–Disability comparative research, or, why nation-state political histories matter
  • ‘Black on the inside’: albino subjectivity in the African novel
  • The role of indigenous and external knowledge in development interventions with disabled people in Burkina Faso: the implications of engaging with lived experiences
  • An intersection in population control: welfare reform and indigenous people with a partial capacity to work in the Australian northern territory
  • Inclusion of marginalised Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples with neurocognitive disability in the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS)

 

Online collective identities for autism: The perspective of Brazilian parents

ANTUNES, Debora
DHOEST, Alexander
2018

Expand view

This paper aims to better understand the role of social media in the definition and spread of views on autism in Brazil. To do so, it explores the identities adopted by parents of autistic people in one of the biggest Brazilian online communities about the subject on Facebook, ‘Sou autista… conheça o meu mundo’ (I am autistic… get to know my world), whose members are mostly parents, mainly mothers of autistic people

 

Disability and the Global South, 2018 Vol.5, No. 1, 1273-1291

Yuin, Kamilaroi, Sámi, and Maori people’s reflections on experiences as ‘Indigenous scholars’ in ‘Disability Studies’ and ‘Decolonisation’

GILROYA, John
UTTJEKB, Margaretha
GIBSONC, Chontel
SMILERD, Kirsten
2018

Expand view

This paper compares and contrasts individual stories of Indigenous peoples working as researchers, with a focus on disability. Firstly, they provide a background to the aim of decolonisation methodology. Second, they highlight their individual stories about thier work, including how they tailored and implemented decolonisation in their research methodology and practices more broadly. They then compare the similarities and differences between their experiences.

 

Disability and the Global South, 2018, Vol.5, No. 2, 1344-1364

Intersection between a Social Gender and Disability: A Self-concept of Women with Disabilities in the Post-feminist Context

JANKAUSKAITE Margarita
SUMSKIENE Egle
GRIGAITE Ugne
October 2016

Expand view

The goal of this article is to analyse the intersection between a social gender and disability, and identify differences between both the perceived and attached identities of women with disabilities. Two qualitative research studies on women with disabilities in Lithuania reveal ambiguity in the relationship of women with disabilities, towards factors that form their identities. Disability here is realised on a deeper level: it structures respondents’ self-perception and self-reflection. The research also points to the fact that this part of an individual’s identity is straightforwardly perceived in their society and more profoundly ruminated by the women themselves. The ‘invisibility’ of the womanhood here suggests that this part of an identity is perceived as a ‘natural’, unquestionable aspect, which is beyond criticism. Such an attitude absorbs rather than transforms normative provisions and hinders the development of practises directed at subordination of gendering structures.

 

From the perspective of a normative subject, disability and womanhood have equal weights, since both these aspects of identity represent deviation from the ‘norm’, as well as other differences and subordination. However, both these aspects have different meanings in the self-perception of women with disabilities. The social model of disability acknowledges various obstacles in the environment, which hinder personal independence or create disability. Gender on the other hand, is often naturalized, and a systemic gender-based discrimination remains unmentioned. Hence, discriminatory structures related to disability are targeted, but gender subordination remains unchallenged.
 

Disability, family and identity

SCHNEIDER, Cort
October 2016

Expand view

Many people with disabilities struggle with issues that relate to identity development.  Many people with disabilities find it difficult to develop a positive sense of self. There is also no question that familial relationships play a significant part in the process of identity construction for people with disabilities. Thus, it is important to examine how family relationships influence the process of identitydevelopment for people with disabilities. Conversely, it relevant to explore how a person’s identity development can impact his or her relationship with family members. This article employs an autoethnographic approach to research in order to examine issues that relate to disability, identity and family. It elucidates the complex nature of family scripts and identity. In addition this paper contends that the process that an individual goes through in order to “come to terms” with a disabled identity, can transform the relationships that an individual has with various family members.

 

Considering Disability, Vol.1, Issue 3&4

DOI: 10.17774/CDJ1.32016.2.20575874

Developing positive identities

BROOKER, Liz
WOODHEAD, Martin
Eds
2008

Expand view

This resource builds on theory and evidence about what makes for positive identity, how it can be affected by adversities, social exclusion and discrimination, and how young children’s resilience can be promoted

Young people and social capital

BOECK, Thilo
FLEMING, Jennie
KEMSHALL, Hazel
June 2006

Expand view

This brief paper explores the concept of social capital and its bearing on young people's lives. In particular it distinguishes between a static social capital (strong/static networks, immediate reciprocity, restricted sense of belonging and outlook in life) and dynamic social capital (diverse networks, generalised reciprocity and diverse outlook). It suggests that young people should be encouraged to embrace an enhanced version of dynamic social capital, and should be offered opportunities to do so. An enhanced dynamic social capital would enable them to cope with risks rather that avoid them, and would give them access to more power and opportunities

Universal declaration on cultural diversity

UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATION
2001

Expand view

This Declaration supports cultural diversity, cultural rights and the role of culture in development - as a key component of human rights. It states that "All persons have [...] the right to express themselves and to create and disseminate their work in the language of their choice, and particularly in their mother tongue; all persons are entitled to quality education and training that fully respect their cultural identity; and all persons have the right to participate in the cultural life of their choice and conduct their own cultural practices, subject to respect for human rights and fundamental freedoms"

Culture and sustainable development : a framework for action

DUER, Kreszentia
1999

Expand view

This report describes the World Bank's evolving programme for culture and sustainable development. It articulates criteria that justify lending for culture, and criteria that limit the Bank's participation. This modestly sized programme is geared toward enhancing the World Bank's effectiveness, and adds an important proactive emphasis on culture and identity to the World Bank's ongoing work

The sexual politics of disability : untold desires

SHAKESPEARE, Tom
GILLESPIE-SELLS, K
DAVIES, Dominic
1996

Expand view

This book attempts to explore the emotional and sexual experiences of disabled people in a variety of key areas, relying predominantly on the verbatim accounts of disabled people themselves

Mexico City declaration on cultural policies

UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATION
1982

Expand view

This declaration acknowledges the many facets of culture, defining it as: "the whole complex of distictive spiritual, material, intellectual and emotional features that characterise a social group... not only the arts and letters but also modes of life, fundamental rights of the human being, value systems, traditions and beliefs." It includes sections which consider cultural identity, the cultural dimension of development, culture and democracy, cultural heritage, artistic and intellectual creation and art education, the relationship of culture with education, science and communication, planning, administration and financing of cultural activities, and finally, international cultural co-operation

E-bulletin

Source e-bulletin on Disability and Inclusion

Subscribe to updates