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Learning From Experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies for hygiene at home for people with high support needs.

World Vision/CBM Australia
May 2018

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This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HYGIENE AT HOME FOR PEOPLE WITH HIGH SUPPORT NEEDS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes strategies that used to assist households and individuals in hygiene tasks at home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka.

NOTE: The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

Advocating for investment in accessible and inclusive WASH

PRYOR, Wesley
et al
January 2018

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Factsheet summarizing the evidence for accessible and inclusive WASH based on the Case for Investment in Accessible and Inclusive WASH. A quick reference for WASH and Disability actors when advocating for investment in WASH that is accessible and inclusive of children and adults with disabilities. 

Factsheet based on Technical Paper TP/04/2018

Learning from experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies to modify existing household toilets and water access

WORLD VISION
CBM Australia
2018

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This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HOME MODIFICATIONS FOR WASH ACCESS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes the strategies which were used to assist people with disabilities to access toilet and water facilities at their own home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka. Houses and toilet structures in the region were made of brick and concrete. No new toilets were built and modifications involved only minor work to existing household structures, water points and toilets.

NOTE:
The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

Factsheet HIV and WASH

STOP AIDS
WaterAid
Catholic Agency For Overseas Development (CAFOD)
November 2013

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"This factsheet sets out to explain the connection between water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) and HIV and AIDS, and provides recommendations on how HIV interventions can integrate WASH into their programming"

Principles and practices for the inclusion of disabled people in access to safe sanitation : a case study from Ethiopia

WILBUR, Jane
October 2010

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This report describes a formative evaluation of WaterAid’s pilot project in Butajira, Ethiopia. Using research methodologies such as a literature review, case studies, participant observation and semi-structured interviews, the findings present that WaterAid applied the charity model within its intervention and had limited impact on societal discrimination. The report concludes by recommending nine key principles for development organisations to mainstream inclusive development. This report would be useful to people interested in the inclusion of disabled people in access to safe sanitation

Principles and practices for the inclusion of disabled people in access to safe sanitation : a case study from Ethiopia

WILBUR, Jane
October 2010

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This briefing note presents a formative evaluation of WaterAid’s pilot project in Butajira, Ethiopia. It highlights background information of the project, key components of the research, the findings of the evaluation and nine guiding principles for development organisations. This note is useful to people interested in the inclusion of disabled people in access to safe sanitation
WaterAid briefing note

A period is no longer a full stop

PANDE, Alka
June 2009

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This article describes a UNICEF-funded initiative in Tamil Nadu, in India, to develop and trial sanitary napkin vending machines in government schools and colleges. A compact electronic incinerator for disposal of soiled napkins also was trialled. Overall these initiatives led to improved menstrual hygiene practices. This information is useful for people interested in menstral hygiene practices

Pilot project on activities with differently able people (DAP) in Varshaw union under Manda upazila in Naogaon district and in Ouchpara union under Bagmara upazila in Rajshahi district

VILLAGE EDUCATION RESOURCE CENTRE (VERC )
May 2008

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This report describes the implementation of a pilot project in two areas in rural Bangladesh, to target differently able people including elderly, pregnant women, disabled people and children. The report highlights the challenges, lessons learned and recommendations, and gives a case study. Individually designed household latrines, rather than standard designs are emphasised, and photos show toilet seats that are presumably placed over a toilet hole. This project was implemented by WaterAid Banglasdesh's partner Village Education Resource Centre (VERC), with involvement of local government staff (Union Parishad officials)

Menstrual hygiene : breaking the silence | Beyond construction : use by all|A collection of case studies from sanitation and hygiene promotion practitioners in South Asia

AHMED, Rokeya
YESMIN, Kabita
2008

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This paper provides information about an awareness-builidng programme from WaterAid Bangladesh focusing on the issue of menstrual hygiene. It highlights the incorporation of menstrual awareness and management in sanitation and hygiene programmes. This paper is useful for people interested in menstrual hygiene issues

Toilets that make compost : low-cost, sanitary toilets that produce valuable compost for crops in an African context

MORGAN, Peter
2007

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Most of the rural population of Africa do not have access to safe and reliable toilets. A good toilet, together with a safe reliable water supply and the practice of good personal hygiene can do much to improve personal and family health and wellbeing. There is an urgent need for the construction of simple, low cost, affordable toilets that are easy to build and maintain and are relatively free of odours and flies. This book describes how to make a range of toilets that also make compost. The compost is useful in vegetable gardens and can also be used for growing trees. This book is primarily intended for use in East and Southern Africa, where there is space, where backyard gardening is practiced and where the climate is warm and wet seasons are interspersed with dry

The problem of handwashing and paying for water in South Africa

HAFFEJEE, Farhaad
CHOPRA, Mickey
SANDERS, David
2007

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This paper shows the results of some research into whether households respond differently to hygiene and handwashing interventions such as Water, Sanitation and Hygiene for All (WASH) depending on the water systems and payment systems that they have

Towards effective programming for WASH in schools : a manual on scaling up programmes for water, sanitation and hygiene in schools

IRC International Water and Sanitation Centre
2007

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This manual deals with school water, sanitation and hygiene education (WASH). It describes the many elements needed for scaling up programmes for water, sanitation and hygiene in schools while ensuring quality and sustainability. It is meant for government and NGO staff responsible for programming WASH in schools

Hygiene promotion in Burkina Faso and Zimbabwe : new approaches to behaviour change

SIDIBE, Mynam
CURTIS, Val
August 2004

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After years of debate, most people working in water and sanitation now agree that hygiene promotion is vitally important. But even now, many programmes either ignore it or do it badly. This field note describes two African hygiene promotion programmes that have successfully used new approaches: Saniya in burkina Faso and ZimAHEAD in Zimbabwe. Both programmes concentrated on understanding how people actually hehave and hence hot to change that behaviour. Both programmes demonstrated ideas that can be applied at a larger scale. Changin human hygiene behaviour is a long process that is difficult to measure and both of these programmes still have obstacles to overcome. However, this work indicates that systematic and carefully managed hygiene promotion programmes can achieve improvement in hygiene behaviour and hence reduction in diarrhoeal diseases

Care for children infected and those affected by HIV/AIDS; a handbook for community health workers

SAVE THE CHILDREN UK
2003

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This handbook aims to contribute towards improving the provision of care and support to children infected by or affected by HIV/AIDS. It aims to provide basic information on HIV/AIDS, and to assist carers in providing home-based care and counselling. Subjects covered in the handbook include basic facts about HIV, HIV counselling and testing, nutrition, hygiene, nursing care for children (including on specific opportunistic infections), and the emotional health of children with guidance on how children cope with bereavement. Practical suggestions are also made on improving communication with children

Action monitoring for effectiveness : improving water, hygiene and environmental sanitation programmes. Part II : fact sheets

SHORDT, Kathleen
2000

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The action monitoring for effectiveness (aMe) approach focuses on application of monitoring theories and practical methods to improve programmes and projects in the short-term in the water, hygiene and sanitation sector. This is the second volume of two, and contains 32 fact sheets. Each fact sheet provides practical examples of indicators, methods and tools for monitoring a specific topic. Topics range from the concrete to the range from concrete issues more abstract issues such as community participation, management and distribution of benefits. They include: the community and its institutions, NGO and programme management, training, gender and finance, establishment of water services, operation and maintenance for water facilities, latrines and use of facilities and hygiene behaviour

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