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National Mechanisms for Reporting and Follow-up : A practical guide to effective state engagement with international human rights mechanisms

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR)
December 2016

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This Guide seeks to provide practical advice on the critical elements that States need to consider when establishing or strengthening their national mechanism for reporting and follow-up, and illustrates this advice with examples of State practice. It is based on the more comprehensive Study of State Engagement with International Human Rights Mechanisms (HR/PUB/16/1/Add.1), which contains more detailed information on these practices

Advancing human rights : update on global foundation grantmaking : key findings

LAWRENCE, Steven
et al
2015

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This paper analyses the current (as of 2012) state of global human rights funding. Through the use of tables, graphs and other methods of data presentation, the International Human Rights Funders Group​ (IHRFG) outline the largest grants foundations, where and how the money is spent by these foundations, and the causes which these funds are spent on

Key findings

FOUNDATION CENTER
INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS FUNDERS GROUP
2015

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A webpage from the Foundation Center, which gives hyperlinked access to the funding profiles of various international causes such as disability, access to justice, and gender equality. In addition there are links to the annual Key Findings on Global Foundation Grantmaking reports published by the Center 

The OPERA framework : assessing compliance with the obligation to fulfil economic, social and cultural rights

CORKERY, Allison
WAY, Sally-Anne Way
OTERO, Victoria Wisniewski
2012

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“This paper presents a practical framework for integrating different tools and techniques in order to provide a more comprehensive assessment of how public policies comply with the obligation to fulfill ESC rights. The OPERA framework (so called because it triangulates Outcomes, Policy Efforts and Resources to make an overall Assessment) articulates relevant human rights standards and principles to take into account when monitoring ESC rights fulfillment and offers practical guidance on which tools and techniques might be employed to evaluate them. These range from simple descriptive statistics that summarize data to more complex fiscal policy and budget analysis that assess the availability and allocation of resources. By making explicit this crucial link between the various human rights standards and principles that underpin the obligation to fulfill and the different assessment methods available to monitor them, the framework enables a systematic approach to building evidence of failures to fulfill ESC rights”

Access to services for people with disabilities in Freetown, Sierra Leone

PILLERON, Sophie
2011

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"The purpose of the DECISIPH project is to promote the rights of people with disabilities in six countries in West Africa: Burkina Faso, Niger, Mali, Senegal, Sierra Leone and Togo. The first expected outcome of the project is to enhance the availability and access to relevant and reliable information on people with disabilities, their rights and their organisations in order to foster advocacy campaigns by disabled people's organisations. The aim of the study was to analyse and compare access to services for people with disabilities with that for people without disabilities in the project's intervention zones. This study in no way attempts to determine the disability prevalence rate. A cross-sectional survey was carried out in several of the DECISIPH project countries. Despite its limitations, this was the first study to be conducted in Sierra Leone and the first to provide data for gaining a better understanding of access to services for people with disabilities compared to that of people without disabilities"
SD/RS 06 No 8

Child disciplinary practices at home : evidence from a range of low- and middle-income countries

UNITED NATIONS CHILDREN’S FUND (UNICEF)
2010

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This report analyses findings on child discipline from 35 Multiple Indicator Cluster Surveys (MICS) and Demographic and Health Surveys (DHS) conducted in low and middle-income countries in 2005 and 2006. Questions on child discipline were addressed to the mother (or primary caregiver) of one randomly selected child aged 2-14 years in each household. The questionnaire asked whether any member of the household had used various disciplinary practices with that child during the past month. The survey covered eight violent disciplinary practices, some of which were psychological (such as shouting and name calling) while others were physical (such as shaking and hitting). The surveys also collected information on three nonviolent forms of discipline, such as explaining why a behaviour is wrong. Finally, interviewers asked the mother (or primary caregiver) about her or his personal beliefs regarding the need for physical punishment in child rearing"

OPERA

CENTER FOR ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL RIGHTS (CESR)

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This section of the Center for Economic and Social rights’ website presents information about the OPERA framework. The centre “developed a simple, yet comprehensive four-step framework to analyse various aspects of the obligation to fulfil economic and social rights. Adopting the acronym OPERA, the framework incorporates different measures for specific human rights principles and standards, by framing them around four levels of analysis: Outcomes, Policy Efforts, Resources and Assessment” 

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