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Global strategy on human resources for health: Workforce 2030. DRAFT for the 69th World Health Assembly

World Health Organisation (WHO)
May 2016

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This report was presented to Member States at the World Health Assembly in May 2016 and is to be read in conjunction with A69/38: Draft global strategy on human resources for health: Workforce 2030. Report by the Secretariat. The vision of this work and report is to "Accelerate progress towards universal health coverage and the UN Sustainable Development Goals by ensuring equitable access to health workers within strengthened health systems". Objectives are "To optimise performance, quality and impact of the health workforce through evidence-informed policies on human resources for health, contributing to healthy lives and well-being, effective universal health coverage, resilience and strengthened health systems at all levels",  "To align investment in human resources for health with the current and future needs of the population and of health systems, taking account of labour market dynamics and education policies; to address shortages and improve distribution of health workers, so as to enable maximum improvements in health outcomes, social welfare, employment creation and economic growth", "To build the capacity of institutions at sub-national, national, regional and global levels for effective public policy stewardship, leadership and governance of actions on human resources for health" and "to strengthen data on human resources for health, for monitoring and ensuring accountability for the implementation of national and regional strategies, and the global strategy".  Global milestones by 2020 and 2030, policy options of Member States, responsibilities of the WHO Secretariat and recommendations to other stakeholders and international partners are discussed for each objective.

 

The labour market for human resources for health in low and middle-income countries

SCHEFFLER, Richard
BRUCKNER, Tim
SPETZ, Joanne
July 2012

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This paper provides an introduction to the terms and tools of labour market analysis and connects these labour market principles to real-world case studies from LMIC. Three examples are provided of issues: workforce shortage in Thailand; unfilled posts in Kenya; and ghost workers in Rwanda. The labour market for health workers is considered and an integrated framework is provided. The technical structure and dynamics of the health worker market is discussed and applied to the first two examples. Task shifting, health worker performance and health worker productivity are also discussed.

Human Resources for Health Observer, No. 11

Quest for quality : interventions to improve human resources for health among faith-based organisations

ADJEI, George A
et al
February 2009

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"Traditionally, faith-based health organisations have been important health care providers in many remote and other under-serviced areas. Currently, these facilities bear the brunt of the competition for scarce human resources. It is important for faith-based organisations to learn from recent experiences and from the creative ways in which colleagues seek to retain their health workers and improve quality of human resource management. [As part of a]"...linking and learning programme, some faith-based umbrella organisations in Tanzania, Ghana, Uganda, and Malawi have joined forces to share their experiences in confronting the human resources crisis: by developing retention schemes, offering in-service training, task shifting, developing the planning and management skills of their staff, better coordination of salary and incentive structures with the public systems, and the development of lobbying instruments for national and international use"

Human resources and training in mental health : mental health policy and service guidance package

FUNK, Michelle
et al
2005

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"This module aims to provide practical guidance...in order to assist countries to develop their human resources. Because of variations between countries, the module cannot provide specific norms (such as number of staff required per population unit). Instead, a set of planning and training tools is provided to assist countries to calculate their own staffing requirements and to train health workers and mental health workers according to their specific needs"
Note: This module is part of a guidance package that consists of a series of inter-related, user-friendly modules that are designed to address the wide variety of needs and priorities in mental health policy development and service planning. The modules should be of interest to policy-makers and health planners; government departments, advocacy organizations and NGOs, families and carers of people with mental health disorders

Participation of African social scientists in malaria control : identifying enabling and constraining factors

NGALAME, Paulyne M
et al
December 2004

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This article discusses research examining the enabling and constraining factors that influence African social scientists' involvement in malaria control. Findings showed that most participants did not necessarily seek malaria as a career path. Having a mentor who provided research and training opportunities, and developing strong technical skills in malaria control and grant or proposal writing facilitated career opportunities in malaria. A paucity of jobs and funding and inadequate technical skills in malaria limited the type and number of opportunities available to social scientists in malaria control. Understanding the factors that influence job satisfaction, recruitment and retention in malaria control is necessary for better integration of social scientists into malaria control. However, given the wide array of skills that social scientists have and the variety of deadly diseases competing for attention in sub-Saharan Africa, it might be more cost effective to employ social scientists to work broadly on issues common to communicable diseases in general rather than solely on malaria

An action plan to prevent brain drain : building equitable health systems in Africa

FRIEDMAN, Eric A
June 2004

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The severe shortage of health professionals in Africa is a huge barrier to expanding AIDS treatment and care and other health goals. African countries, donor governments, and international institutions must link their responses to AIDS to a broader initiative to build equitable health systems in Africa, with special attention to strengthening human resources and ensuring the right to health care for all. This report provides an action plan for preventing the 'brain drain' of skilled health workers to developed countries. It addresses issues around building equitable health systems by offering a series of recommendations to meet people's health care needs by paying more attention to human resources. These proposals include improvements in health infrastructure, higher salaries and benefits for health workers, enhanced investment in training institutions, reduced recruitment by wealthy nations and capacity-building for human resources management

Human resources for health

ELDIS

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The human resources for health dossier is an information resource and tool for advocacy for the importance of human resources in making improvements in health service delivery for poor people. It offers practical up to date information about how to address human resource problems and issues, drawing upon evidence about what works, and identifying innovations in approaches, policy and practice

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