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Learning From Experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies for hygiene at home for people with high support needs.

World Vision/CBM Australia
May 2018

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This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HYGIENE AT HOME FOR PEOPLE WITH HIGH SUPPORT NEEDS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes strategies that used to assist households and individuals in hygiene tasks at home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka.

NOTE: The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

Learning from experience: Guidelines for locally sourced and cost-effective strategies to modify existing household toilets and water access

WORLD VISION
CBM Australia
2018

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This learning resource is the result of a partnership between World Vision Australia and CBM Australia that aims to improve inclusion of people with disabilities in World Vision’s Water, Hygiene and Sanitation (WASH) initiatives, including in Sri Lanka. The guidelines are based on experiences and observations from World Vision’s implementation of the Rural Integrated WASH 3 (RIWASH 3) project in Jaffna District, Northern Province, funded by the Australian Government’s Civil Society WASH Fund 2. The four year project commenced in 2014. It aimed to improve the ability of WASH actors to sustain services, increase adoption of improved hygiene practices, and increase equitable use of water and sanitation facilities of target communities within 11 Grama Niladari Divisions (GNDs) in Jaffna District.

To support disability inclusion within the project, World Vision partnered with CBM Australia. CBM Australia has focused on building capacities of partners for disability
inclusion, fostering connections with local Disabled People’s Organisations, and providing technical guidance on disability inclusion within planned activities. World Vision also partnered with the Northern Province Consortium of the Organizations for the Differently Abled (NPCODA) for disability assessment, technical support and capacity building on inclusion of people with disabilities in the project.

HOME MODIFICATIONS FOR WASH ACCESS
This document is one of two developed in the Jaffna District and describes the strategies which were used to assist people with disabilities to access toilet and water facilities at their own home. The strategies were designed to be low cost and were developed using locally available materials and skills in the Jaffna District of Sri Lanka. Houses and toilet structures in the region were made of brick and concrete. No new toilets were built and modifications involved only minor work to existing household structures, water points and toilets.

NOTE:
The development of this learning resource was funded by the Australian Government's Civil Society WASH Fund 2.

A home-based rehabilitation intervention for people living with HIV and disability in a resource-poor community, KwaZulu-Natal : study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

COBBING, Saul
HANASS-HANCOCK, Jill
MYEZWA, Hellen
2015

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In this paper, the researchers develop a needs-based home-based rehabilitation programme for people living with HIV in order to improve their quality of life and functional ability. The study aims to  provide rehabilitation professionals and researchers with evidence that can be utilised to improve existing rehabilitation interventions for people living with HIV.

The paper outlines a randomised control trial to test the programme, to be conducted at a public hospital in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. The trial will assess the participants’ quality of life, perceived level of disability, functional ability and endurance

Trials 16:491

Evaluation of CABDICO disability programme, Cambodia

THOMAS, Maya
EANG, Bun Yeang
October 2012

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Capacity Building of People with Disability in the Community Organisation (CABDICO) is a local NGO in Cambodia, working in 3 provinces, Seam Reap, Banteay Mean Chey and Kep, and led a project “Reintegration and Capacity Building of People with Disability in the Community. The overall goal of this project was to improve the capacity and the inclusion of persons with disabilities (including landmine and UXO victims, women with disability, children with disability), their family members and other vulnerable groups (e.g. poor widow as head of household) to enjoy the quality of life and social development actions with barrier-free and basic human rights respects. This evaluation report addresses the following five fundamental evaluation criteria of the CABDICO project over the past three years: quality and relevance of design, effectiveness, and efficiency of implementation, impact and potential for sustainability

Social panorama of Latin America 2012

UN ECONOMIC COMMISSION FOR LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN (ECLAC)
2012

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"This report provides an overview of the living conditions of persons with disabilities in the Latin American region. It is divided into two parts. The first, comprising chapters I and II, tracks recent poverty and income distribution trends as well as citizen perceptions of inequality and trust in institutions. The second part homes in on the issue of care, starting with the conceptual and policy view of care as a right, the position regarding paid care work, social expenditure patterns (especially, household spending on care services), the situation of persons with disabilities and their care needs, recent policies that the countries are implementing, and, finally, the challenges that lie ahead"
Briefing paper
2012 894

Community based homecare for older people in South East Asia

HELPAGE KOREA
2011

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This report explains the growing need for a continuum of care for the elderly in their home. Community based homecare is presented as an option that enables older people who have lost the ability to fully care for themselves to continue living as long as possible in their own home and community, independently or with their families. The benefits of community based homecare are described and lessons learned from HelpAge’s ROK-ASEAN programme are highlighted. This resource is useful for people interested in community based homecare for the elderly

Psychosocial care and support for older carers of orphaned and vulnerable children : programming guidelines

REGIONAL PSYCHOSOCIAL SUPPORT INITIATIVE (REPSSI)
HELPAGE INTERNATIONAL
2011

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"These guidelines were especially developed with the aim of impacting on the wellbeing of older carers living in situations of poverty and in a time of HIV and AIDS. The aim of this set of resource materials is to enable home based caregivers, development facilitators and peer counsellors to have relevant information and guidance on strengthening psychosocial care and support to older carers. The ideas proposed can be used individually or in groups as resource materials...The guideline comes in eight units...Each unit begins with an introductory section which gives community caregivers important background information about the topic being discussed. Each section is accompanied by four types of activities: reflection exercises, case studies, practical application and finally planning exercises and general tips...A range of annexes is appended to this guideline for more detailed reference to issues raised in the unit discussions"

Building bridges: a home-based care model for supporting older carers of people living with HIV

HELPAGE INTERNATIONAL (HAI)
July 2010

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This summary guideline describes a model for supporting older home-based carers developed by HelpAge International in Tanzania, which is being implemented in several districts. The model has four elements: collecting baseline data, training older carers in home-based care and counselling, setting up support groups and linking older carers to services. This resource is useful to people interested in home-based care for supporting older carers of people living with HIV

HIV, disability and rehabilitation : considerations for policy and practise

HEALTH ECONOMICS AND HIV/AIDS RESEARCH DIVISION (HEARD)
January 2010

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This issue brief considers the links between HIV and disability - that people with disabilities are among the key populations at high risk to exposure to HIV, and that people living with HIV may develop impairments and disabilities as a result of the disease. It anticipates an increased demand for rehabilitation services in Eastern and Southern Africa, given the improved access to HIV treatments and high prevalence of people living with HIV in the region, and warns that many in areas services are already stretched and resource-poor, so may struggle to cope with greater demand. The brief focuses on: issues regarding the definition of disability; implications for rehabilitation services; and considerations for disability grants

Integrating gender into HIV/AIDS programmes in the health sector : tool to improve responsiveness to women’s needs

AMIN, Avni
et al
2009

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The purpose of this operational tool is to: raise awareness of how gender inequalities affect women’s access to and experience of HIV and AIDS programmes and services; and offer practical actions on how to address or integrate gender into specific types of HIV and AIDS programmes and services. The vulnerability of women, their risk of HIV infection and the impact of the epidemic on them are heightened by many factors, including: the low status accorded to women in many societies, their lack of rights, their lack of access to and control over economic resources, the violence perpetrated against them, the norms related to women’s sexuality, and women’s lack of access to information about HIV. This tool is primary aimed at primarily programme managers and health-care providers involved in setting up, implementing or evaluating HIV and AIDS programmes

Disability among clients attending Taif Rehabilitation Centre, Saudi Arabia

AL-SHEHRI, Abdul-Salam A
ABDEL-FATTAH, Moataz M
July 2008

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This is a cross-sectional study examining 850 hospital records of people who were admitted to Rehab Armed Forces Rehabilitation Center, Taif, Saudi Arabia from 1999 to 2005. Data were collected on age, sex, nationality, date of admission and discharge, and type of disability. Recommendations are provided to expand home care programmes, to minimize duration of stay at the rehabilitation centres, and to increase health education of the public to assist in encouraging disabled people to adapt to daily life activities

The care economy : gender and the silent AIDS crisis in Southern Africa

URDANG, Stephanie
March 2006

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This article considers the impact of AIDS on women’s roles and responsibilities within the household ‘care economy’. In particular, it emphasises that all interventions aimed at reversing the AIDS epidemic need to take into account the excessive work-load that members of the household, usually women, shoulder in responding to the needs of sick family members. Most notably, gender equality and care economy issues need to be identified by development programmes. There is also a need to implement policies that focus on issues such as treatment, prevention, education, economic empowerment and violence against women. The article argues that unless the care economy and the relations of gender inequality within the household are included in the design, implementation, monitoring and evaluation of such interventions, results will be compromised

Support women caregivers : fight AIDS

THE GLOBAL COALITION ON WOMEN AND AIDS
2006

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This factsheet considers the impact of HIV and AIDS on families and communities because of most the care for people living with AIDS is provided by women and girls. It looks at the social and economic burden and the training and support needed, and it suggests actions for national governments and for international partners

HIV-related stigma, discrimination and human rights violations: case studies of successful programmes

JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
2005

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This report is a collection of case studies of projects, programmes and activities around the world that have used innovative methods to challenge HIV-related stigma, discrimination and human rights violations. The case studies are grouped under stigma-reduction approaches; anti-discrimination measures; and human rights and legal approaches. They are followed by some cross-project/activity analysis that identifies common elements and a number of key principles of success, each of which offers an entry point for innovative and potentially effective work

Analysis of aid in support of HIV/AIDS control, 2000-2002

DAC
JOINT UNITED NATIONS PROGRAMME ON HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS)
June 2004

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This report is a review of statistical data on aid to HIV/AIDS control. It was compiled by the Development Assistance Committee (DAC) Secretariat in collaboration with the members of the DAC Working Party on Statistics (WP-STAT) and UNAIDS between February and May 2004. The key findings are presented concerning total official development assistance commitments for HIV/AIDS control, and bilateral aid. It also includes contributions to the Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The report notes that larger donors especially multilaterals are the main funders of treatment programmes, which require substantial funding and long term commitments. Smaller donors tend to concentrate on HIV prevention, but also support home-based care and social mitigation activities

Family and community interventions for children affected by AIDS

RICHTER, Linda
MANEGOLD, Julie
PATHER, Riashnee
2004

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This report, based on over 400 documents, reviews the available scientific and programmatic information on interventions aimed at children, families, households and communities. Specifically, the report considers: home-based child-centred development programmes focussing on health and nutrition; psychosocial care and management of inherited assets; interventions directed at supporting families and households to cope with the HIV/AIDS problem and interventions directed at building the capacities of communities to provide long-term care and support for children and households. It also contains an annotated bibliography of available literature in this area in Section 2. The main emphasis of the report is on intervention principles rather than on actual program implementation details as it is widely understood that interventions need to be tailored for each particular situation. There is no specific focus on very young children but interventions to support children, families and communities run into each other with inevitable overlaps

Palliative care in Sub-Saharan Africa : an appraisal

HARDING, Richard
HIGGINSON, Irene
2004

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This report was written from the belief that palliative care is, and will be for the forseeable future, an essential component in the continuum of managing HIV/AIDS in sub-Saharan Africa. There is now a wealth of experience in sub-Saharan Africa about the ways in which palliative care can be delivered both affordably and effectively. However, there remains a lack of properly documented evidence and research to demonstrate the importance of this work and promote its development. This report provides a review of existing evaluations of palliative care projects in sub-Saharan Africa with an emphasis on isolating the factors that lead to sustainability, local ownership and scaling up; the role of palliative care in the management of HIV/AIDS and how to integrate palliative care and Anti-Retroviral Therapy (ART); primary health based care projects in two countries, Kenya and Malawi, that could provide lessons for the implementation of palliative care; lessons from other parallel programmes which mirror palliative care delivery, for example, tuberculosis programmes, and primary care programmes with good links to local clinics and hospitals, and community mobilization and empowerment projects linked to health facilities. In this way it contributes to the effort of providing an evidence base to demonstrate the importance of palliative care and provides a source of reference for policy makers, practitioners, donors and researchers

Community care, change and hope : local responses to HIV in Zambia

LUCAS, Sue
2004

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This case study documents a successful model for facilitating a strong community response to HIV and AIDS. The Salvation Army Change Programme in Ndola and Choma Districts in Zambia illustrates the facilitation process stimulating an appropriate local response to HIV and AIDS and essential component of human capacity development. The model builds on local strengths and resources, stimulating ordinary people to address the barriers that prevent them from using HIV and AIDS information and services to prevent new infections, compassionately care for those who are infected and mitigate the effects of the epidemic on families and the community. Only by addressing personal risk, stigma and the potential for personal and societal change will the demand for and use of voluntary counselling and testing, prevention of mother to child transmission and antiretroviral therapy services increase

Handbook on paediatric AIDS in Africa

TINDYEBWA, Denis
et al
2004

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This handbook intends to provide users in resource-poor countries with a tool that can be adapted to their needs. It follows the four principles of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child and aims to provide a simple, accessible and practical handbook for health workers involved in preventing infection and caring for children infected and affected by HIV. It includes substantial chapters on caring for HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children, infants and orphans; diagnosis and the clinical stages of HIV infection; clinical conditions associated with HIV (diarrhoea, malnutrition, neurological manifestations, skin manifestations and more); pulmonary conditions; anti-retroviral therapy for children; youth issues, long-term and terminal care planning; psychosocial support. The primary targets are medical students and their lecturers, nurses, clinicians, community health workers and other service providers in resource poor settings where there is a significant HIV and AIDS burden

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