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Cross-generational and transactional sexual relations in sub-Saharan Africa : prevalance of behaviour and implications for negotiating safer sexual practices

LUKE, Nancy
KURZ, Kathleen
September 2002

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This paper is a literature and evidence survey of cross-generational and transactional sex in Africa. It examines the age and economic asymmetries in sexual relationships in an African context, prevalence of cross-generational and transactional sexual relationships, adolescent girls' and men's motivations and adolescent girls' negotiating power in relationships. It comes to the conclusion that adolescent girls have power when negotiating the start and end of relationships and they are strongly motivated to enter into cross-generational relationships for the material benefits and status that they bring. However, once they have entered the relaltionship the balance of power shifts to the man, especially in the context of gift-giving.
The paper also examines the evidence around cultural acceptance of cross-generational and transactional sexual relationships, violence and rape within the relationships, multiple relationships, and outcome of the relationships. The authors' recommendations are to: gather policy support for changing the social norm; mount programmatic responses; conduct research to investigate the success of programmatic responses, document the policy process, and fill other important information gaps

Learning from what young people say... about sex, relationships and health

WARWICK, Ian
AGGLETON, Peter
December 2001

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Finding out what young people think helps to ensure that programmes and policies are more likely to meet their needs. The guide (developed to sit alongside the Dynamic Contextual Analysis resource) aims to support policy makers, programme planners and practitioners to find out more about young people's ideas, beliefs and feelings about sex, relationships and health. This toolkit sets out how to involve young people and other partners in this process, suggests ways to collect information, analyse it, and present it in a way that is likely to influence programmes and policy

Believe in yourself : GET SEXY

BURKITT
1996

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This article discusses a range of issues facing disabled people and sexuality. Disabled people are not seen as 'sexy' in society and are not allowed to develop a sense of sexuality - for example through the media. Young disabled people may also lack adequate sex education and may be sheltered from developing their sexuality by over-protective parents

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