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HIV/AIDS, stigma, denial, fear and discrimination: experiences and responses from African and Caribbean communities in Toronto

The African and Caribbean Council on HIV/AIDS in Ontario (ACCHO)
HIV Social, Behavioural and Epidemiological Studies Unit, University of Toronto
2006

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This is the report of a study which explores the experiences of HIV positive people from Africa and the Caribbean who are living in Toronto; and the experiences and perspectives of people from these communities at large, through interviews and focus groups. The study seeks to understand HIV-related stigma, discrimination, denial and fear, and how these impact on responses to HIV, including testing, treatment and support. Recommendations from participants include, the need for greater sensitivity and knowledge among health care providers, more ethnoculturally-appropriate services, education campaigns and community development measures. The report would be of interest to people living with HIV and AIDS, physicians, policy makers, service providers, family members, friends and the general public

Five myths about AIDS that have misdirected research and treatment

ROOTBERNSTEIN, Robert, S
1995

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Reviews a range of research to argue that AIDS is caused by a combination of factors, so is a 'synergistic' disease, rather than solely being caused by HIV infection. Argues that research has been misunderstood in a number of key areas and argues: different groups develop AIDS at different rates which can only be explained by other factors that may vary across risk groups; examples of people who are infected with HIV reverting to being HIV negative are common; antibodies for HIV may signal that the effective 'T-cell' immune response has been unsuccessful and thus herald the loss of immune regulation; a range of nonretroviral treatments such as safer sex practices, elimination of drug use, high nutrient diets and limiting re-exposure to HIV and its co-factors have proven to be effective means of peventing or delaying the onset of AIDS; many immunosuppressive factors are as highly correlated with AIDS risk groups as HIV

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