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WHO: New QualityRights guidance and training tools (pilot version)

WHO
2017

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"As part of the QualityRights Initiative, WHO has developed a comprehensive package of training and guidance modules. The modules can be used to build capacity among mental health practitioners, people with psychosocial, intellectual and cognitive disabilities, people using mental health services, families, care partners and other supporters, NGOs, DPOs and others on how to implement a human rights and recovery approach in the area of mental health in line with the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and other international human rights standards".

 

The core mental health and human rights modules are:

Understanding human rights 
(WHO/MSD/MHP/17.1)
Promoting human rights in mental health 
(WHO/MSD/MHP/17.2)
Improving mental health and related service environments and promoting community inclusion 
(WHO/MSD/MHP/17.3)
Realising recovery and the right to health in mental health and related services 
(WHO/MSD/MHP/17.4)
Protecting the right to legal capacity in mental health and related services 
(WHO/MSD/MHP/17.5)
Creating mental health and related services free from coercion, violence and abuse
(WHO/MSD/MHP/17.6)

 

Further to these, there are 4 advanced modules, 2 service improvement tools and 4 guidance tools

 

The promise and the reality: a mental health workforce perspective on technology-enhanced youth mental health service delivery

ORLOWSKI, Simone
LAWN, Sharon
MATTHEWS, Ben
et al
October 2016

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Digital technologies show promise for reversing poor engagement of youth (16–24 years) with mental health services. In particular, mobile and internet based applications with communication capabilities can augment face-to-face mental health service provision. Results of in-depth qualitative data drawn from various stakeholders involved in provision of youth mental health services in one Australian rural region are described. Data were obtained using focus groups and semi-structured interviews with regional youth mental health clinicians, youth workers and support/management staff and analysed via inductive thematic analysis. Six main themes were identified: young people in a digital age, personal connection, power and vulnerability, professional identity, individual factors and organisational legitimacy. 

 

DOI: 10.1186/s12913-016-1790-y

Innovations In Dementia

ROUTLEDGE, Martin
SANDERSON, Helen
BAILEY, Gill
October 2016

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This book offers concrete ideas and examples to those interested in driving a radically different approach to supporting people with dementia and their families. "We have explored a number of approaches with people who have been leading their development. We have been keen to look at both approaches that emerge from working directly to improve support for people with dementia and others that have different roots, but we think are potentially very transferable. None of the approaches is yet being used at any significant scale". Discussions and examples are all UK based. There is an introduction detailing current problems and issues with care and support for people with dementia. 10 approaches are described for housing and support, 4 concerned with enabling people to have good days and 7 associated with enabling people to connect with their community. 

Mental health and psychosocial support for South Sudanese refugees in northern Uganda: a needs and resource assessment

ADAKU, Alex
et al
September 2016

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Since December 2013, an armed conflict in South Sudan has resulted in the displacement of over 2.2 million people, more than 270,000 of whom were, at the time of the research, in refugee settlements located throughout Uganda. A mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS)​MHPSS needs and resource assessment was carried out in Rhino Camp refugee settlement in northern Uganda, between June and August 2014 following World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) guidelines for MHPSS needs assessments in humanitarian settings. The assessment used a range of methodologies including: 1) a desk (literature) review to understand the context for mental health service provision; 2) an analysis of data from existing health information systems (HIS); 3) an assessment of the current infrastructure for service provision using a shortened version of a Who does What Where until When (4Ws); and 4) semi-structured individual and group interviews (total n = 86) with key informants (n = 13) and general community members (individual interviews n = 28, four focus groups with n = 45).

An evidence review of research on health interventions in humanitarian crises

BLANCHET, Karl
et al
November 2013

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This report presents a review of the evidence base of public health interventions in humanitarian crises by assessing the quantity and quality of intervention studies, rather than measuring the actual effectiveness of the intervention itself.  It notes an increase in quality and volume of evidence on health interventions in humanitarian crises and recognises that evidence remains too limited, particularly for gender-based violence (GBV) and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). This report identifies a number of common needs across all areas, namely more evidence for the effectiveness of systems and delivery, better developed research methods, and more evidence on dispersed, urban and rural populations, on ensuring continuity of care and measuring and addressing health care needs in middle-income settings (particularly NCDs)

Note: Use links on the left hand side of the webpage to access either the full report, the executive summary, or the individual chapters arranged by health topic

UNHCR mental health and psychosocial support for persons of concern

MEYER, Sarah
2013

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"This evaluation reports on how well the United Nations High Commission for Refugees considers and provides for the well-being and mental health of persons of concern to the agency. Through a survey of UNHCR field staff, extensive literature and policy review, and key informant interviews with MHPSS experts from academic institutions, international agencies and non-governmental organizations, this review provides insight into how UNHCR’s current activities contribute towards improved mental health and psychosocial well-being of displaced persons and how UNHCR’s current policy frameworks relate to established practices and frameworks in the MHPSS field"

Fighting against epilepsy in Rwanda : an efficient patient-centred experience

FINEL, Elodie
March 2012

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This document presents a learning-from-experience "capitalisation’’ process on Handicap International’s epilepsy project in Rwanda. It includes 4 parts: (1) Principles & Benchmarks which sets the framework including main concepts, definitions and intervention context (2) Intervention methods which detail the main activities monitoring the project and its tools (3) Focus which presents the community-based approach and provides a deeper look into the know-how and good practices developed through this approach (4) Results which provides the limitations and recommendations found during the capitalisation process to different stakeholders
SD/LL 04

Fighting against epilepsy in Rwanda : an efficient patient-centred experience

FINEL, Elodie
2012

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This brief provides a summary of the learning-from-experience process on Handicap International's project "Promoting access to medical care, ensuring the school, social, family and community integration of epileptic people in Rwanda." Strategy and intervention methods are highlighted along with the community-based approach
Brief SD/LL 04

Insights on ageing : a survey report

WILLIAMS, Jennifer
2011

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This report presents the results of a survey administered in 32 countries which highlight the situation of older people around the world today. The information presented in the survey report provides insights into what older people around the world think about ageing and what they would like to see their governments do to make living in older age better. This resource is useful for people interested in the global situation of older people

What do older people need in emergencies?|The experience in the Philippines after typhoon Ketsana

FORMILLEZA, Sammie P
2011

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This report presents a study on the experiences of older people in 5 rural and urban communities of the Philippines following Typhoon Ketsana. The research methods included key informant interviews (KII), focus group discussions (FGD) and a review of secondary materials. The results provide a summary of older people’s needs and problems on the following issues: basic food needs, shelter (including evacuation), water supply, health, clothing, household articles, bedding and livelihood activities. It is recommended that it is critical to work with the older people and their community organisations in identifying ways and means to address their concerns during disaster and recovery situations

The vulnerability and living conditions of older people in Addis Ababa

HELPAGE INTERNATIONAL ETHIOPIA
INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR MIGRATION (IOM)
September 2010

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This report presents the findings of a city-wide survey that aimed to provide comprehensive information on the vulnerabilities and coping mechanisms of poor urban older people in Addis Ababa and to explore options for linkages to existing service and assistance programmes. The report presents a range of issues including food and income security, shelter, water and sanitation, health, HIV and AIDS, training, and family and community care. It concludes by making recommendations for improving older people’s food and income security, access to healthcare, and living environment. It calls for older women to be given special emphasis. This study is intended as a background and guide to government agencies, donors, international agencies and international and national NGOs in order to better target programmes and projects for older people

Caught up in conflict : older people in humanitarian crises in Kyrgyzstan

MIKKONEN-JEANNERET, Eppu
RAYAPOVA, Roza
SCHLAEFFER, Alois
June 2010

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This report presents the results of phone call survey led by HelpAge International with older people affected by the conflict situation in Osh in 2010. "The interviews revealed that two thirds of the respondents were coping badly with the situation, about 60 per cent stated that they found it difficult to get food. While 70 per cent said that they had to take medicine regularly, only about one third had some medication left. It came out that older people in humanitarian crisis often face life-threatening problems. However, there were also positive examples of how older people cope with these threats. They often are, against all odds, still caring for other people and help out each other, regardless of ethnics or religion"

Assessment report : the vulnerability of older people in post-conflict Osh, Kyrgyzstan

MACDONALD, David
2010

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"This report discusses the findings of a survey which was organized by HelpAge International with the intention of evaluating both the social situation and the requirements of vulnerable older people in a post conflict environment. The survey was undertaken in Osh, Kyrgyzstan, following the violent events of June 2010 in south of the country. It was conducted by Luch Lotosa, a local NGO, and the results were evaluated by HelpAge staff. The purpose of the survey and this resulting report was to assess the nature of the specific challenges of vulnerable older people in Osh today in order to inspire action on their behalf on the part of HelpAge’s emergency team as well as all other organizations working in the area. The results of the survey suggest a myriad of problems including those of emotional, social and subsistence nature. However, the greatest challenges older people in Osh appear to be facing are economic. According to this survey, the economic constraints people are facing are significant enough to have a major detrimental impact on the ability of many of the most vulnerable to feed and clothe both themselves and their dependents. The scale of the problems reported in the survey appears rather large; however, it is the prognosis for the future which holds the most concern"

Mental health and psychosocial support in humanitarian emergencies : what should humanitarian health actors know

IASC REFERENCE GROUP FOR MENTAL HEALTH AND PSYCHOSOCIAL SUPPORT IN EMERGENCY SETTINGS
2010

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"This document is for humanitarian health actors working at national and sub-national level in countries facing emergencies and crises. It applies to Health Cluster partners, including governmental and non-governmental health service providers. Based on the IASC Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings (IASC, 2007), this document gives an overview of essential knowledge that humanitarian health actors should have about mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) in humanitarian emergencies"

Packages of care for epilepsy in low- and middle-income countries

MBUBA, Caroline K
NEWTON, Charles R
October 2009

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This article focuses on the management of epilepsy in low- and middle-income countries and recommends a package of care - a combination of interventions aimed at improving the recognition and management of conditions to achieve optimal outcomes - for epilepsy, that is sustainable

Enduring war and health inequality in Sri Lanka

VIJE, Mayan
RATNESWAREN, Suppiah
March 2009

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This evidence-based report examines the wider impact of war on the health of the population and the violation of human rights in the conflict zones of North-East Sri Lanka. Over 25 years, public health has deteriorated due to ruined infrastructure, the exodus of health care professionals and mass displacement of people. The report concludes with recommendations to the main players in the conflict, including the Sri Lankan Government and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE), the international community and UN organisations working on health

IASC guidelines for mental health and psychosocial support in emergency settings : checklist for field use

INTER-AGENCY STANDING COMMITTEE (IASC)
2008

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This resource provides a summary of the guidelines for mental health and psychosocial support in emergency settings. It details a general introduction, a matrix of minimum responses in the midst of emergencies, and eleven checklists for key actions of emergency response. The checklists cover the following areas: coordination; monitoring and evaluation; protection and human rights; community mobilization and support; health services; education; dissemination of information; food security and nutrition; shelter and site planning; water and sanitation. This resource is useful for humanitarian agencies and practitioners

IASC guidelines for mental health and psychosocial support in emergency settings

INTER-AGENCY STANDING COMMITTEE (IASC)
2007

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These guidelines provide information to organisations and individuals on how to respond during humanitarian emergencies by highlighting eleven specific action sheets that offer practical guidance on mental health and psychosocial support. The guidelines include a matrix of interventions with guidance for emergency planning, actions to be taken in the early stages of an emergency, and comprehensive responses needed in the recovery and rehabilitation phases. This resource is gives humanitarian actors useful inter-agency, inter-sectoral guidance and tools for responding effectively in the midst of emergencies

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