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Healthcare provider's attitude towards disability and experience of women with disabilities in the use of maternal healthcare service in rural Nepal

DEVKOTA, Hridaya Raj
KETT, Maria
GROCE, Nora
MURRAY, Emily
June 2017

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BACKGROUND:
Women with disabilities are less likely to receive maternal healthcare services compared to women without disabilities. While few studies have reviewed healthcare experience of women with disabilities, no studies have been conducted to understand provider's attitude towards disability in Nepal, yet the attitude and behaviour of healthcare providers may have a significant influence on aspects of care and the use of service by women with disabilities. This study examines healthcare provider's attitudes towards disability and explores the experience of women with disabilities in maternal healthcare service utilization during pregnancy and childbirth.

METHOD:
The study used mixed method approach. An attitude survey was conducted among 396 healthcare providers currently working in public health facilities in Rupandehi district of Nepal. For additional insight, eighteen in-depth interviews with women with disabilities who used maternal healthcare services in a healthcare facility within the study district in their last pregnancy were undertaken. The Attitude Towards Disabled Persons (ATDP) scale score was used to measure the attitudes of healthcare providers. For quantitative data, univariate and multivariate analysis using ANOVA was used to understand the association between outcome and independent variables and qualitative analysis generated and described themes.

Reproductive Health, 2017

Strengthening mental health system governance in six low- and middle-income countries in Africa and South Asia: challenges, needs and potential strategies

PETERSEN, Inge
et al
February 2017

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The aim of this study was to identify key governance issues that need to be addressed to facilitate the integration of mental health services into general health care in the six participating "Emerald" countries (Ethiopia, India, Nepal, Nigeria, South Africa, and Uganda).  The study adopted a descriptive qualitative approach, using framework analysis. Purposive sampling was used to recruit a range of key informants, to ensure views were elicited on all the governance issues within the expanded framework. Key informants across the six countries included policy makers at the national level in the Department/Ministry of Health; provincial coordinators and planners in primary health care and mental health; and district-level managers of primary and mental health care services. A total of 141 key informants were interviewed across the six countries. Data were transcribed (and where necessary, translated into English) and analysed thematically using framework analysis, first at the country level, then synthesised at a cross-country level.

Health-related rehabilitation and human rights : analyzing States' obligations under the United Nations convention on the rights of persons with disabilities

SKEMPES, Dimitrios
STUCKI, Gerold
BICKENBACH, Jerome
August 2014

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This article analyses States' obligations with respect to rehabilitation of health under the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Based on internationally accepted standards of human rights law interpretation and drawing extensively on current literature from the field of global health policy, the authors identify the range of governments legal obligations regarding health related rehabilitation across several key human right commitment areas, such as equality and nondiscrimination; progressive realization; international cooperation; participation in policymaking processes; the accessibility, availability, acceptability, and quality of rehabilitation services; privacy and confidentiality; and informed decision making and accountability.To support effective implementation of the Convention, governments need to focus their efforts on all these areas and devise appropriate measures to monitor compliance with human rights principles and standards in rehabilitation policy, service delivery, and organization. This study lays the foundations for a rights-based approach to rehabilitation offering a framework that may assist in the evaluation of national rehabilitation strategies, the development of appropriate indicators and the identification of gaps in the implementation of the Convention

Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Volume 96, Issue 1

Moving towards universal health coverage: health insurance reforms in nine developing countries in Africa and Asia

Lagomarsion G.
Garabrant A.
Adyas A.
Otoo N.
Muga R.
et al
September 2012

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The implementation of national health insurance reforms designed to move towards universal health coverage by 9 low-income and lower-middle-income countries in Africa and Asia  is reported. Five countries at intermediate stages of reform (Ghana, Indonesia, the Philippines, Rwanda, and Vietnam) and four at earlier stages (India, Kenya, Mali, and Nigeria) are considered. These countries’ approaches to raising prepaid revenues, pooling risk, and purchasing services are described using the functions-of-health-systems framework. Their progress across three dimensions of coverage: who, what services, and what proportion of health costs is assessed using the coverage-box framework. Patterns in the structure of these countries’ reforms including use of tax revenues to subsidise target populations and steps towards broader risk pools are identified. Trends in progress towards universal coverage, including increasing enrolment in government health insurance and a movement towards expanded benefits packages are reported. Common, comparable indicators of progress towards universal coverage are needed.

Evidence for the effectiveness of rehabilitation-in-the-community programmes

VELEMA, Johan P
EBENSO, Bassey
FUZIKAWA, Priscila L
March 2008

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"The present literature review identified 29 reports from 22 countries in Asia, Africa and Central America reporting on the outcomes of rehabilitation-in-the-community programmes in low and middle income countries published between 1987 and 2007. Interventions included home visits by trained community workers who taught disabled persons skills to carry out activities of daily living, encouraged disabled children to go to school, helped find employment or an income generating activity, often involving vocational training and/or micro-credit. Many programmes had a component of influencing community attitudes towards disabled persons. The information collected shows that such programmes were effective in that they increased independence, mobility and communication skills of disabled persons, helped parents of disabled children to cope better and increased the number of disabled children attending schools. Economic interventions effectively increased the income of disabled persons although they rarely made them financially independent. CBR activities result in social processes that change the way community members view persons with disabilities, increase their level of acceptance and social inclusion and mobilise resources to meet their needs"
Leprosy Review, Vol 79, Issue 1

Global trends in disability rehabilitation and their implications for leprosy programmes

THOMAS, Maya
THOMAS, Maliakal Joseph
March 2008

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This article explores the global trends in disability rehabilitation and the implications for leprosy programmes. It provides a brief summary the Biwako Millennium Framework of the Asia and Pacific decade to gain a better understanding of current issues and the implications for leprosy rehabilitation programmes
Leprosy Review, Vol 79, Issue 1

Universal coverage of health services: tailoring its implementation

CARRIN, Guy
MATHAUER, Inke
XU, Ke
EVANS, David
2008

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In 2005, the Member States of WHO adopted a resolution encouraging countries to develop health financing systems capable of achieving and/or maintaining universal coverage of health services – where all people have access to needed health services without the risk of severe financial consequences. In doing this, a major challenge for many countries will be to move away from out-of-pocket payments, which are often used as an important source of fund collection. Prepayment methods will need to be developed or expanded but, in addition to questions of revenue collection, specific attention will also have to be paid to pooling funds to spread risks and to enable their efficient and equitable use. Developing prepayment mechanisms may take time, depending on countries’ economic, social and political contexts. Specific rules for health financing policy will need to be developed and implementing organizations will need to be tailored to the level that countries can support and sustain. In this paper we propose a comprehensive framework focusing on health financing rules and organizations that can be used to support countries in developing their health financing systems in the search for universal coverage.

Can telepsychiatry replace in-person psychiatric assessments? A review and meta-analysis of comparison studies

HYLER, S E
GANGURE, D P
BATCHELDER, S T
2005

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Systematic review and meta-analysis of studies published between 1956 and 2002 included 14 studies comparing telepsychiatry with in-person psychiatry and high versus low bandwidth telepsychiatry. The study suggested no difference between telepsychiatry and in person psychiatry in terms of accuracy or satisfaction although anecdotal evidence suggested higher bandwidth was slightly superior for assessments requiring detailed observation of subjects. Authors expected telepsychiatry to replace in person in certain research and clinical situations

Challenges in leprosy rehabilitation

THOMAS, Maya
THOMAS, MJ
2004

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"’Multiple drug Therapy' (MDT) has transformed the outcome of leprosy in people affected by it. Leprosy affected persons develop much less disfiguring disabilities after use of MDT. As a result leprosy services are now becoming integrated into general health services. When this integration becomes stronger, leprosy rehabilitation is also likely to adopt methods followed by general health services. Vertical, stand-alone services, based on single aetiology like leprosy, will require some adaptation to fit in with the environment of general health services. The authors speculate that changes in leprosy rehabilitation could make 'community based rehabilitation' (CBR) an important method for the vast majority of leprosy patients who need rehabilitation. This paper discusses some of the concerns regarding the suitability of CBR for leprosy rehabilitation"
Asia Pacific Disability Rehabilitation Journal, Vol 15, No 1

An intensive self care training programme reduces admissions for the treatment of plantar ulcers

CROSS, Hugh
NEWCOMBE, Lesley
September 2001

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"This paper describes, in detail, an intensive 14 day Self Care Training Programme that is conducted at Lalgadh Leprosy Services Centre in Nepal. An evaluation of the programme was undertaken in which hospital admission for infected plantar ulceration was the outcome measure. This paper presents an overview of the issues related to impairment, a description of the Self Care Training Programme, an analysis of the evaluation results and a discussion of the findings"
Leprosy Review, Vol 72, Issue 3

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