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A human right to health : what about persons with disabilities?

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
2015

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This advocacy briefing paper presents key information about including people with disabilities in health systems. It highlights key health facts, related legal frameworks and explores issues such as lack of access to equitable healthcare and the benefits of equitable healthcare. It provides recommendations for stakeholders and suggests ways to measure progress

Advocacy briefing paper

Why should rehabilitation be integrated into health systems?

HANDICAP INTERNATIONAL
2015

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This advocacy briefing paper presents information about the importance of rehabilitation being integrated into health systems. It highlights a brief overview and definition of rehabilitation, and related key health facts and issues such as lack of access to rehabilitation, the value of rehabilitation and legal frameworks. It provides recommendations for stakeholders and suggests ways to measure progress

Advocacy briefing paper

Universal health coverage for inclusive and sustainable development. A synthesis of 11 country case studies.

MAEDA, Akiko
ARAUJO, Edson
CASHIN, Cheryl
HARRIS, Joseph
IKEGAMI, Naoki
REICH, Michael R.
et al
2014

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Universal health coverage (UHC) for inclusive and sustainable development synthesises the experiences from 11 countries—Bangladesh, Brazil, Ethiopia, France, Ghana, Indonesia, Japan, Peru, Thailand, Turkey, and Vietnam—in implementing policies and strategies to achieve and sustain UHC. These countries represent diverse geographic and economic conditions, but all have committed to UHC as a key national aspiration and are approaching it in different ways. The UHC policies for each country are examined around three common themes: (1) the political economy and policy process for adopting, achieving, and sustaining UHC; (2) health financing policies to enhance health coverage; and (3) human resources for health policies for achieving UHC. The path to UHC is specific to each country, but countries can benefit from experiences of others and avoid potential risks

Moving towards universal health coverage: health insurance reforms in nine developing countries in Africa and Asia

Lagomarsion G.
Garabrant A.
Adyas A.
Otoo N.
Muga R.
et al
September 2012

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The implementation of national health insurance reforms designed to move towards universal health coverage by 9 low-income and lower-middle-income countries in Africa and Asia  is reported. Five countries at intermediate stages of reform (Ghana, Indonesia, the Philippines, Rwanda, and Vietnam) and four at earlier stages (India, Kenya, Mali, and Nigeria) are considered. These countries’ approaches to raising prepaid revenues, pooling risk, and purchasing services are described using the functions-of-health-systems framework. Their progress across three dimensions of coverage: who, what services, and what proportion of health costs is assessed using the coverage-box framework. Patterns in the structure of these countries’ reforms including use of tax revenues to subsidise target populations and steps towards broader risk pools are identified. Trends in progress towards universal coverage, including increasing enrolment in government health insurance and a movement towards expanded benefits packages are reported. Common, comparable indicators of progress towards universal coverage are needed.

Universal coverage of health services: tailoring its implementation

CARRIN, Guy
MATHAUER, Inke
XU, Ke
EVANS, David
2008

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In 2005, the Member States of WHO adopted a resolution encouraging countries to develop health financing systems capable of achieving and/or maintaining universal coverage of health services – where all people have access to needed health services without the risk of severe financial consequences. In doing this, a major challenge for many countries will be to move away from out-of-pocket payments, which are often used as an important source of fund collection. Prepayment methods will need to be developed or expanded but, in addition to questions of revenue collection, specific attention will also have to be paid to pooling funds to spread risks and to enable their efficient and equitable use. Developing prepayment mechanisms may take time, depending on countries’ economic, social and political contexts. Specific rules for health financing policy will need to be developed and implementing organizations will need to be tailored to the level that countries can support and sustain. In this paper we propose a comprehensive framework focusing on health financing rules and organizations that can be used to support countries in developing their health financing systems in the search for universal coverage.

Organization of services for mental health : mental health policy and service guidance package

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
2003

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"This publication aims to: present a description and analysis of mental health services around the world examining different services and their organization and activities; review the current status of service organization around the world; make recommendations for organizing services; discuss crucial issues in the organization of services; discuss barriers to the organization of services and suggest solutions. The publication is intended to be useful to a range of people, including policy-makers and health planners, governmental and non-governmental organisations, and people with mental disorders and their families"

A modern paradigm for improving healthcare quality

MASSOUD, M Rashad F
et al
2001

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Outlines the principles and frameworks underlying modern quality improvement in healthcare, including the integration of evidence-based medicine in improving clinical quality. Simplifies QI, recognising that this flexible methodology can be applied through a variety of approaches, along a spectrum of increasing complexity. Four applications of QI are described and illustrated with case examples: individual problem solving, rapid team problem solving, systematic team problem solving, and ongoing process improvement. The final section describes a number of useful tools for QI in developing countries.

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