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Universal health coverage for inclusive and sustainable development. A synthesis of 11 country case studies.

MAEDA, Akiko
ARAUJO, Edson
CASHIN, Cheryl
HARRIS, Joseph
IKEGAMI, Naoki
REICH, Michael R.
et al
2014

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Universal health coverage (UHC) for inclusive and sustainable development synthesises the experiences from 11 countries—Bangladesh, Brazil, Ethiopia, France, Ghana, Indonesia, Japan, Peru, Thailand, Turkey, and Vietnam—in implementing policies and strategies to achieve and sustain UHC. These countries represent diverse geographic and economic conditions, but all have committed to UHC as a key national aspiration and are approaching it in different ways. The UHC policies for each country are examined around three common themes: (1) the political economy and policy process for adopting, achieving, and sustaining UHC; (2) health financing policies to enhance health coverage; and (3) human resources for health policies for achieving UHC. The path to UHC is specific to each country, but countries can benefit from experiences of others and avoid potential risks

Giving with one hand...evaluation of post-earthquake physical rehabilitation response in Haiti, 2010 : a systems analysis

TATARYN, Myroslava
BLANCHET, Karl
2012

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This report presents the evaluation of the post-emergency rehabilitation response in Haiti in order to assess what had been achieved, to learn from good and not-so-good practice, and to promote the development of an effective rehabilitation sector in the future.This evaluation provides evidence, to inform humanitarian organisations, about what must be done in a post-disaster situation so that people with disabilities have access to relief and protection on an equal basis with others, and what is required in the long-term to develop a good rehabilitation service

Caring for landmine victims

INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE OF THE RED CROSS (ICRC)
June 2005

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This booklet examines the challenges involved in providing assistance to landmine victims, many of whom cannot be provided with sufficient care because of poverty and a lack of health facilities. It also highlights the responsibilities of states to the Ottawa Convention and the new protocol on explosive remnants of war (ERW), and encourages increased efforts by both health-care systems and governments to support the victims

Guidelines for essential trauma care

MOCK, C
et al
2004

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These guidelines provide a series of resource tables for essential trauma care that detail the human and physical resources that should be in place to assure optimal care of the injured patient at a range of health facilities throughout the world. The health facilities range from rural health posts, to small hospitals staffed by general practitioners, to hospitals staffed by specialists, to tertiary care centres. They also offer a series of recommendations on methods to promote such standards including training, performance improvement, trauma team organisation and hospital inspection.
The guidelines are a collaboration between the World Health Organization, the International Society of Surgery and the International Association for the Surgery of Trauma and Surgical Intensive Care

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