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Responding to the Syrian health crisis : the need for data and research

COUTTS, Adam
et al
March 2015

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This article assesses the impact of the war in Syrian the context of the health system and neighbouring countries and the rise in non-communicable diseases. The authors advocate that  urgent policy and research attention needs to be given to the generation of timely and high-quality evidence on the effectiveness of the humanitarian health response, the capacity of health systems within Syria, and the issue of non-communicable diseases among internally displaced people and refugees

The Lancet, Vol 3, Issue 3, PE8-E9, Mar 01, 2015

 

 

An evidence review of research on health interventions in humanitarian crises

BLANCHET, Karl
et al
November 2013

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This report presents a review of the evidence base of public health interventions in humanitarian crises by assessing the quantity and quality of intervention studies, rather than measuring the actual effectiveness of the intervention itself.  It notes an increase in quality and volume of evidence on health interventions in humanitarian crises and recognises that evidence remains too limited, particularly for gender-based violence (GBV) and water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). This report identifies a number of common needs across all areas, namely more evidence for the effectiveness of systems and delivery, better developed research methods, and more evidence on dispersed, urban and rural populations, on ensuring continuity of care and measuring and addressing health care needs in middle-income settings (particularly NCDs)

Note: Use links on the left hand side of the webpage to access either the full report, the executive summary, or the individual chapters arranged by health topic

Why do women not use antenatal services in low- and middle-Income countries? a meta-synthesis of qualitative studies

FINLAYSON, Kenneth
DOWNE, Soo
January 2013

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This article aims to inform the development of future antenatal care programmes through a synthesis of findings in all relevant qualitative studies. The findings suggest that there may be a misalignment between current antenatal care provision and the social and cultural context of some women in low and middle income countries
PLoS Med, Vol 10, Issue 1

Bridging the gaps between research, policy and practice in low- and middle-income countries : a survey of health care providers

GUINDON, G Emmanuel
et al
May 2010

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This article discusses the results of a survey to examine the gaps that continue to exist between research based evidence and clinical practice. Health care providers in 10 low- and middle-income countries were surveyed about their use of research-based evidence and examined factors that may facilitate or impede such use. The conclusion is that locally conducted or published research plays an important role in changing the professional practice of health care providers surveyed in low- and middle-income countries and increased investments in local research, or at least in locally adapted publications of research-based evidence from other settings, are therefore needed. Although access to the Internet was viewed as a significant factor in whether research-based evidence led to concrete changes in practice, few respondents reported having easy access to the Internet. Therefore, efforts to improve Internet access in clinical settings need to be accelerate

Don’t just do it, do it right : evidence for better health in low and middle income countries

THARYAN, Prathap
March 2010

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This article puts forward the argument that evidence for better health outcomes involves a two-step process: getting the right sort of evidence - evidence that is convincing and is for low- and middle-income countries - and getting this evidence used - through access to reliable evidence (such as the Cochrane Library) to getting evidence into policy and practice

Sub-Saharan Africa's mothers, newborns, and children : where and why do they die?

KINNEY, Mary V
et al
2010

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"The aim of this paper is to present the current situation in sub-Saharan Africa for mothers, newborns, and children under age 5 years—including the progress towards the MDGs for maternal and child health, why and where deaths occur, what known interventions can be employed to prevent these deaths, and current coverage of these interventions. All data used in this review are from the most recent UN databases, national household surveys, and peer-reviewed papers where appropriate, which are referenced accordingly"
PLoS Medicine, 7(6)

SUPPORT tools for evidence-informed health policymaking (STP)

OXMAN, Andy
HANNEY, Stephen
Eds
December 2009

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This is a set of 18 tools that can be used by those involved in finding and using research evidence to support evidence-informed health policy making. The series addresses four broad areas: supporting evidence-informed policymaking; identifying needs for research evidence; finding and assessing research evidence; and, going from research evidence to decisions

Evaluating health research capacity building : an evidence-based tool

BATES, Imelda
et al
July 2006

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Health research capacity building is essential to the success and sustainability of research programmes. This article describes the development and use of a tool for determining whether the required infrastructure is present in a given setting, and for designing and evaluating capacity-building programmes in health research. It provides an analysis of published models and effective capacity-building principles, together with structured reflection and action by stakeholders at the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) in Kumasi, Ghana

Insecticide resistance and malaria control : current trends in research

KULKARNI, Manisha
April 2006

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This article outlines current trends in malaria research. Recent research studies, here briefly reviewed, have focused on the molecular scale of resistance in Anopheles, geographical scale of resistance in Africa, impact of insecticide-treated nets (ITN) in host-seeking vectors, implications of resistance for malaria control, pyrethroids and alternative insecticides, and on new initiatives to fast track the development of improved insecticides

A strategy to enhance the global research effort in maternal and child health : the Mother-Child International Research Network

HAMILTON, Richard
March 2006

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This article presents the mission and objectives of the Mother-Child International Research Network. The network aims to support and bring together researchers and research institutions working in the field of mother and child health in low-income countries, facilitating access to scientific debate and opportunities for collaboration. The network's website www.mother-child.org holds scientific updates, distance-learning activities and weblog facilities and is designed to support health communication and exchange and increase exposure to a wide international audience

Monitoring financial flows for health research 2006 : the changing landscape of health research for development

MATLIN, Stephen
DE FRANCISCO, Andres
Eds
2006

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This study aims to provide NGOs and decision-makers with an overview of currently available information on resource flows into health research. It paints the picture of a changing landscape, with an increased number of actors and increases in resources for health promotion and health research in developing countries. The document provides statistical data on global spending on R&D for health, looks at trends and patterns of morbidity and mortality and discusses health research challenges and priorities for the public sector

Is cybermedicine killing you? The story of a Cochrane disaster

EYSENBACH, Gunther
KUMMERVOLD, Per Egil
2005

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This editorial briefly reviews the series of events that led to the publication, dissemination and eventual retraction of a flawed Cochrane systematic review on interactive health communication applications (IHCAs), which was widely reported in the media with headlines such as 'Internet Makes Us Sick', 'Knowledge May Be Hazardous to Web Consumers' Health', 'Too Much Advice Can Be Bad for Your Health', 'Click to Get Sick?' and even 'Is Cybermedicine Killing You?'. The authors show that while the media attention helped to speed up the identification of errors, leading to a retraction of the review after only 13 days, a paper subsequently published by Rada shows that the retraction, in contrast to the original review, remained largely unnoticed by the public. The authors examine the three flaws of the review and then discuss 'retraction ethics' for researchers, editors/publishers and journalists, making recommendations for the future

Piloting paperless data entry for clinical research in Africa

MISSINOU, M A
OLOLA, C H,
ISSIFOU, S
et al
2005

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The study compared the accuracy of data entry using the current standard practice (a paper-based case report form with double data entry) with that using a personal digital assistant (PDA) in a clinical study in rural Gabon. The paperless systems functioned smoothly and no data were lost. The clinicians involved in this study preferred the handheld computers, and their use will be considered in future studies in an African clinical research network

Participation of African social scientists in malaria control : identifying enabling and constraining factors

NGALAME, Paulyne M
et al
December 2004

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This article discusses research examining the enabling and constraining factors that influence African social scientists' involvement in malaria control. Findings showed that most participants did not necessarily seek malaria as a career path. Having a mentor who provided research and training opportunities, and developing strong technical skills in malaria control and grant or proposal writing facilitated career opportunities in malaria. A paucity of jobs and funding and inadequate technical skills in malaria limited the type and number of opportunities available to social scientists in malaria control. Understanding the factors that influence job satisfaction, recruitment and retention in malaria control is necessary for better integration of social scientists into malaria control. However, given the wide array of skills that social scientists have and the variety of deadly diseases competing for attention in sub-Saharan Africa, it might be more cost effective to employ social scientists to work broadly on issues common to communicable diseases in general rather than solely on malaria

The 10/90 report on health research 2003-2004

GLOBAL FORUM FOR HEALTH RESEARCH
2004

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This report, the fourth since Global Forum for Health Research formed in 1998, covers progress in helping correct the 10/90 gap (that only ten per cent of health research funds are spent on 90 per cent of the world's problems) over the past two years. It focusses on health and health research as sound economic investments; priority setting in health research; progress in measuring the 10/90 gap; research capacity strengthening; information networks in health research; gender; the MDGs and health research; and networks in the priority research areas

Tecnologías de la información y comunicaciones

MONTEAGUDO Peña, José Luis
2004

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Information and communication technologies are essential to support professional research activities in biomedicine and health. Their adoption and use is linked to efficiency and competitiveness. After needs analysis, ICTs applications whose use is recommended, are identified. Needs refer to activities linked to the execution of research projects but also to teaching, continuous training and professional development. Based on that, it is proposed a formative programme structure with different competence levels and with a combination of horizontal common general skills and vertical specialization areas. Finally, it is highlighted that new technologies facilitate new instruments but also they represent new working cultures and present new ethical and legal dilemmas to the researchers that would need to be educated in new working environments

The 10/90 report on health research 2003-2004

GLOBAL FORUM FOR HEALTH RESEARCH
2004

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This site contains up-to-date information on progress in helping correct the 10/90 gap in health research. It includes reports from 1999, 2000, 2001/2002 and 2003/2004. The most recent, the fourth since Global Forum for Health Research formed in 1998, covers progress in helping correct the 10/90 gap (that only ten per cent of health research funds are spent on 90 per cent of the world's problems) over the past two years. It focusses on health and health research as sound economic investments; priority setting in health research; progress in measuring the 10/90 gap; research capacity strengthening; information networks in health research; gender; the MDGs and health research; and networks in the priority research areas

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