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Improving provider-client communication : reinforcing IPC/C training in Indonesia and self-assessment and peer review

KIM, Y M
et al
2000

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Report of a study that tested the effectiveness of two low-cost alternatives to supervision (self-assessment and peer review) that may reinforce providers' skills after training. The performance of 3 groups of providers, who attend family planning clients was compared. Provider-client interactions were improved in the groups undergoing peer review or self-assessment, as was the level of facilitative communication. The level of information-giving was not improved in the control group or the groups undergoing peer review or self-assessment

Quality of supervisor-provider interactions in Zimbabwe

KIM, Young Mi
et al
2000

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The report of a study that focused on supervisors' conduct during regularly scheduled supervisory visits to health facilities and how their interactions with providers contribute to quality of care. Its main goals were to gain a better understanding of supervisory practices and make recommendations on how to improve supervision

Anthropological perspectives on injections : a review

REELER, A V
2000

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There is evidence that injections and injection equipment are now often used by lay people in developing countries. Epidemiological evidence links the large number of unsafe injections to serious bloodborne infections such as viral hepatitis b and c, and HIV. This article examines the reasons behind the demand for injections by consumers and the administration of unnecessary or unsafe injections by different types of provider. Interventions aimed at reducing the risk of unsafe injections are discussed in relation to cultural and social factors as well as those factors associated with health systems. Suggestions are made for approaches to the design of such interventions

Benchmark surveys on childhood immunization in Thailand, Nepal, Zimbabwe and Tanzania

PRINCETON SURVEY RESEARCH ASSOCIATES (PSRA)
1999

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Far fewer children than in the past are threatened by polio, diphtheria and measles thanks to the administration of basic vaccines through national immunization programmes. Nonetheless, a new generation of vaccines targeting other illnesses has not been as widely embraced. To begin to address this problem, surveys were undertaken of health care professionals, primarily pediatricians and general practitioners, and non-health care professionals, including health policy planners in the ministries of health and finance, officers at NGOs dealing with health issues, journalists who cover health care, academics and religious leaders, in Africa and Asia. This research was undertaken in order to develop a basic model of the decision making process that health professionals employ when considering whether to add vaccines to their national immunization programmes. This paper documents the findings of this exercise, and probes health workers' attitudes toward new vaccines in general, and toward the vaccines for Hib and rotavirus specifically

The essential handbook. Radio and HIV/AIDS : making a difference : a guide for radio practitioners, health workers and donors

ADAM, Gordon
HARFORD, Nicola
1999

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Part of the UNAIDS best practice collection, this publication outlines an inexpensive communications methodology for media and HIV/AIDS workers. It is illustrated with examples of successful HIV/AIDS radio programming from all over the world. Includes sections on planning, researching, designing and producing radio programming, with a participatory emphasis

Primary prevention of mental, neurological and psychosocial disorders

WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION (WHO)
1998

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This book describes a number of simple and effective measures for the primary prevention of selected mental, neurological, and psychosocial disorders. Addressed to policy-makers as well as mental health professionals, the book aims both to increase awareness of the potential of primary prevention and to encourage the use of specific interventions. Four disorders are covered: mental retardation, epilepsy, suicide, and burnout of health care staff. Each disorder is discussed according to a common format that includes information on the size of the problem, risk factors and causes, and measures available for primary prevention. The book adopts a public health approach, arguing that the multifactorial causes of most mental and neurological disorders requires broad-based strategies involving many different sectors. Recommended lines of action range from simple procedures to measures at the legislative level. [Publisher's abstract, amended]

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